Amid the latest wave of diesel-centric accusations, the BMW Group has stressed its innocence to the charges aimed at the German car industry

BMW has addressed the allegations of secret meetings between German car manufacturers amid the diesel crisis, saying that the brands involved discussed AdBlue tanking infrastructure in Europe, rather than colluding on ways to get around European emissions laws.

Following reports last week of an EU investigation into an alleged cartel between AudiBMWPorscheMercedes-Benz and Volkswagen, BMW has defended its position. It said in a statement: “BMW Group vehicles are not manipulated and comply with respective legal requirements.”

The BMW Group previously denied any emissions manipulation in the wake of the Volkswagen emissions scandal and has now reaffirmed its position on the matter. 

The statement also revealed that official investigations - both national and international - were conducted into BMW regarding diesel manipulation, from which no evidence of wrongdoing was uncovered. Previous investigations into diesel emissions reached Fiat Chrysler Automobiles, the PSA Group and Renault, in addition to the widely publicised and ongoing scrutiny of the Volkswagen Group. 

In contrast to Audi and Mercedes, which both confirmed last week that some of its respective cars could receive voluntary emissions software tweaks, BMW has stated that there is no need for any tweaking of its Euro 6-standard diesel cars. 

However, BMW is continuing to offer a software update for its Euro 5-standard diesels. This update is voluntary and cost-free. 

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24 July 2017

A lot of Chest beating going on here, if BMW haven't been found to have manipulated emissions, then where's the Beef......?

Peter Cavellini.

24 July 2017

BMW appears to be a cut above the others in my opinion, I can't see the mentality of doing this and then inventing the i3 and i8 but that could just be me being naive and to be honest BMW do appear to at least be trying to get their cars to be lighter than their predecessors and this has been an ongoing theme at BMW over the years.  I really hope they are not involved as it's a company that I truly admire. The other thing I have noticed is other similar companies do not appear to have any appreciation of the need to produce lighter and cleverer cars like the i3 and i8 they just seem to want to produce ever more self indulgent diesel based and "only possible in europe because of  diesel" trucks and pick-up trucks for that matter despite the push for more efficient vehicles globally.

(Declaration I drive a 3.0 litre M-sport e39 (petrol) and have done for the past 11 years)

24 July 2017

Friends with a BMW diesel were told their car would need £ 2,500 worth of repairs to replace injectors.   Thankfully, they'd just taken out an extended warranty.

 

But seriously, a "quality" car like BMW shouldn't be needing that much work done on it when it's just out fo warranty.   Injectors are as important to the operation of the engine as the crankshaft.   They should be liefted for the life of the car, not disposable as BMW seem happy to sell you!

 

BMW's shocking record on knowingly putting in inferior components is dreadful.   And an insult for those in Europe when the same parts get warranted out to 10 years in the USA.

24 July 2017
Symanski wrote:

Friends with a BMW diesel were told their car would need £ 2,500 worth of repairs to replace injectors.   Thankfully, they'd just taken out an extended warranty.

 

But seriously, a "quality" car like BMW shouldn't be needing that much work done on it when it's just out fo warranty.   Injectors are as important to the operation of the engine as the crankshaft.   They should be liefted for the life of the car, not disposable as BMW seem happy to sell you!

 

BMW's shocking record on knowingly putting in inferior components is dreadful.   And an insult for those in Europe when the same parts get warranted out to 10 years in the USA.

I had a friend with the same problem which was to do with the amount of Sulphur in the fuel,different grades in other Territories might or might not be affected, I believe BMW have coated the Cylinder bores now to try and stop this,yes, your Friends were lucky mine weren't , they had to argue about before it was resolved, I've, with a new Engine!

Peter Cavellini.

24 July 2017
Peter Cavellini wrote:

I had a friend with the same problem which was to do with the amount of Sulphur in the fuel,different grades in other Territories might or might not be affected, I believe BMW have coated the Cylinder bores now to try and stop this,yes, your Friends were lucky mine weren't , they had to argue about before it was resolved, I've, with a new Engine!

 

Another condition that BMW put on was that you don't use Bio fuel in your diesel.   Every single pump in the UK serves bio fuel!   You can't escape it.   BMW have made imposssible conditions on the use of their cars.

 

And that's what wrong with your friend's case.   What can you do if you've done everything you can to look after the car and engine if firstly BMW have made impossible requirements?   And why should you be left out of pocket for BMW's lack of making the product fit for use in the regions they sell?

 

Only because there was a threat of a class action in the USA did they extend warranties out for some parts.   We get nothing because BMW can get away with it.

289

24 July 2017

All the brands are having issues with Injectors now, and it is unlikely that anyone with a car out of warranty is going to avoid it.

It is something to do with the very high pressures they are running through the injectors in an effort to reach emission targets....especially (but not exclusively) Diesels.

They are very expensive to replace even as recon units, and on some vehicles difficult to get at. Jeep Grand Cherokee CRD needs the engine dropping off its mounts to get at the rearmost injector for example.

Just ridiculous and designed to make running costs so high that you only buy new cars...not used.

25 July 2017
289 wrote:

They are very expensive to replace even as recon units, and on some vehicles difficult to get at. Jeep Grand Cherokee CRD needs the engine dropping off its mounts to get at the rearmost injector for example.

Just ridiculous and designed to make running costs so high that you only buy new cars...not used.

EU Consumer laws are rather powerful.   Things like a washing machine you'd expect to last over 5 years, so if it does break down even out of "warranty", you can still claim for a repair.

 

Now apply that to cars with faulty injectors.   You're expecting to have to replace brakes etc because they wear with use.   But injectors costing many thousands to replace is a major bill that nobody rightly should be expecting.   And they're not, as you pointed ut with the Jeep, designed to be easily replacable.

 

So EU Consumer laws should apply, and owners should be getting the same 10 year cover that BMW has been forced to offer in the USA.

 

24 July 2017
It is becoming increasingly credible that the German definition of business is quite different from the rest of the world. For them it seems a bit like love and war. All is fair. 38000 people die every year due to excessive emissions from "clean" diesel cars. But it's okay. It's all good. Business as usual. There's nothing to see here. As soon as the German elections are over, Berlin will let this cartel sell their death traps as usual all in the name of business and commerce.

25 July 2017

There is a lot of finger pointing but without any proof, its hard to really blame one manufacturer. This is not a debate about whether BMW,s are reliable be it injector quality or otherwise. BMW are Mercedes can specify the quality of individual components but there is no way to accommodate for bad fuel. All these companies are pretty Hitleresque in the way they do business and so so many companies today are involved in Cartels so you need to open your minds if you are in business this is the way of the world in 2017. "A lot of Chest beating going on here, if BMW hasn't been found to have manipulated emissions, then where's the Beef". How True. 

26 July 2017
rdsreference wrote:

BMW are Mercedes can specify the quality of individual components but there is no way to accommodate for bad fuel.

Engines have to be fit for purpose, and that means working with the fuels available in the regions they're being sold.

 

When you go to a supermarket, or one of the branded fuel companies, how do you know the quality of the fuel?   Some believe supermarket fuels aren't as good, yet they all come from the same refinery.   All you know is the price and if you read the information on the pump that all fuels are covered by the BS standard.

 

Consumers are buying what's available and the likes of BMW must ensure that their products work reliably with them.   They're simply using this as an excuse to avoid their own responsibilities to their customers.

 

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