The software of 850,000 Audis with V6 and V8 diesel engines is being tweaked in a voluntary recall

Audi has issued a voluntary recall for 850,000 cars worldwide that are equipped with V6 and V8 TDI diesel engines.

The free voluntary recall aims to tweak the software of affected cars, to improve their emissions in real-world driving conditions. 

Audi announced the recall but has not yet confirmed the number of affected cars in the UK. The brand has been working with the German Federal Transport Authority (KBA) to implement the fix. 

Audi said it would co-operate with authorities in their investigations, but avoided mentioning if any wrongdoing had yet been found. It did mention ongoing investigations by the KBA, with the possibility that if the German authority should find any discrepancies, further actions will be carried out. 

Audi also said the recall will future-proof the affected cars against possible bans that might be implemented in the future. 

The move by Audi follows a recall implemented recently by Mercedes-Benz that affects several hundred thousand cars in the UK and three million in Europe. 

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Comments
21

21 July 2017

Poor customers.

VW customers have many problems afetr their recall...

 

22 July 2017

Any evidence? People who make unqualified pronouncements (and who can't spell) are not credible.

For the record my 2009 Passat (140,000 k) has had no problems post (or pre) recall. Slightly increased urban fuel consumption, that's all. Am about to order a diesel Golf.

22 July 2017

I know people who have problems after the recalls (EA189 engine, i.e. 2.0 TDI)... Problems with EGR (several times replaced after the recall). Engine in safety mode... Moreover VW has problems of stocks for these parts... Strange...I think that the engine does not work anymore as before the recall, especially in terms of exhaust gaz recycling (cycles, time).VW has had to do an internal communication to restore the confidence and deal with the complaints after recall (for cars < 250 000 km) .

21 July 2017
What a mess! Still you'll hear some peeping: diesel is clean. It has a high BS ratio! That's what. I'm surprised why May's transport ministry is acting so dead? Are they still thrall to this diesel menace? Change the company taxation that still favours this dirty fuel so that diesel sales can slide back to the 10 to 15% levels before tax subsidies started.

23 July 2017

Would love to know of the tax subsidies diesel owners have been getting according to fadyady. I must have been missing out for the last 32 years of diesel car motoring.

21 July 2017

So don't bother.

21 July 2017

Why is this voluntary,   and not mandatory ??

 

23 July 2017

Why is it that all the petrol obsessed posters decry any improvement to emissions availalable through better software update by VW on 6 and  8 cylinder engines for free yet the same people applaud Tesla for constantly updating the software on their cars? Surely it cannot be the biased ignorant petrol heads views that cause their angst?

24 July 2017
mpls wrote:

Why is this voluntary,   and not mandatory ??

In the UK, compulsory recalls are generally only issued for serious safety issues. Other European countries may differ.

There is also yet to be any ruling that VW has broken any EU laws, or those of many other countries, which is why there have been no fines handed out anywhere other than America. The USA is different because the wording in the relevant legislation is different, and Volkswagen was indisputably guilty. As I understand it, all software and hardware that affect emissions equipment must be declared to the EPA - a clause that does not feature in any other country's laws. Volkswagen was penalised not for emissions breaches, but for running an undeclared device that controlled the car's emissions equipment.

24 July 2017
mpls wrote:

Why is this voluntary,   and not mandatory ??

In the UK, compulsory recalls are generally only issued for serious safety issues. Other European countries may differ.

There is also yet to be any ruling that VW has broken any EU laws, or those of many other countries, which is why there have been no fines handed out anywhere other than America. The USA is different because the wording in the relevant legislation is different, and Volkswagen was indisputably guilty. As I understand it, all software and hardware that affect emissions equipment must be declared to the EPA - a clause that does not feature in any other country's laws. Volkswagen was penalised not for emissions breaches, but for running an undeclared device that controlled the car's emissions equipment.

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