From £19,9958
In larger estate form the new Ford Mondeo continues to impress, offering increased practicality and passenger comfort

Our Verdict

Ford Mondeo

Ford's family car is now in its fourth iteration, but is the Mondeo ready to take the fight to a world burgeoning with rivals?

Nic Cackett
9 October 2014

What is it?

The estate version of the new Mondeo. It’s launching alongside the hatchback, with the same engine lineup and starting at £22,045 for the entry-level Style model - a £1250 walkup from the five-door car that’s reflected across the board. 

That buys you around 20kg more bodywork, and all the usual advantages that come with it. The hatchback is hardly short on boot space, but load the wagon to the ceiling without moving the seats and there’s close to 100 litres more on offer if you forgo a spare wheel, at 755 litres. 

Flatten the back row (which is child’s play) and the advantage is closer to 200 litres, to 1630 litres. Total load capacity is less than that which Volkswagens quote for the new Passat - and up to the parcel shelf, a Mondeo hatch will actually offer marginally more space if you opt to keep just a tyre repair kit under the boot floor. 

Peering in from the rear end, though, it’s hard to imagine anyone complaining at the carpeted cavern on offer.

Certainly not rear passengers, anyway. The increased headroom afforded by the estate’s more generous roofline is obvious from the inside; Ford itself measuring the gap at a useful 31mm, without a sunroof to accommodate. 

In the Mondeo, that’s the difference between hosting a six-foot teenager comfortably in the back, and not just tolerably. 

There is a price to pay at the business end, of course - but it’s fractional. In the 1.5-litre EcoBoost petrol we tested, the estate emitted 3g/km more CO2 than the five-door, was less than 1mpg thirstier and 0.1 second slower to 62mph. So, in the real world, effectively the same. In Titanium spec, with a substantial amount of toys, the starting price creeps up to £23,495. 

What's it like?

Rather like the hatch we drove earlier in the week, unsurprisingly. Which is to say very good in many ways and entirely satisfactory everywhere else. 

Comfort and refinement are undeniably and impressively enhanced; Ford’s chassis engineer privately conceding that the Mondeo’s dynamic compromise is now as much about driver contentment as it is about obliging their enthusiasm. 

That approach will have some in mourning, but, frankly, the trade-off feels about right. The estate we drove swapped out the adaptive damper system for the standard passive setup, and still rode on 18-inch wheels as though it had twice the suspension travel of its predecessor. 

The new rear axle, with quieter subframe mounts and superior stiffness throughout, has clearly delivered the better bump absorption and NVH improvements intended. 

A quieter, more considered, possibly more ponderous Mondeo estate is the result. 

It’s more detached, certainly - chiefly as a result of the electric power steering, which inevitably falls short of the previous hydraulic rack’s crisp feedback and responsiveness. But there’s accuracy enough in the new system to keep the almost identical MacPherson front struts aimed at the right piece of road - and sufficient resistance to convey stability at high speed. 

The chief difference here then is the 1.5-litre EcoBoost, a petrol unit very much in the modern template: responsive without being fast, industrious without being shrill and not quite frugal enough to suggest itself as a serious alternative to Ford’s diesel engines. 

It develops 158bhp at 6000rpm, but truthfully you’ll have lost interest by the time 177lb ft of torque starts trailing off beyond 4500rpm. 

That’s sufficient for covering 0-62mph in 9.3 seconds, with some flexibility in a long sixth gear and otherwise decent progress without the need for an endless flogging of the throttle - but only just. Which doesn’t necessarily bode well for the cheaper, more familiar 1.0-litre EcoBoost due next spring. 

That’ll be a touch lighter over the nose, although almost certainly not enough to make up for the significant shortfall in power. 

Should I buy one?

The combined petrol engines will likely comprise less than 10 per cent of Mondeo sales in the UK, and if you’re using the new model as intended (i.e. racking up painless miles) the 1.5-litre EcoBoost doesn’t offer any compelling reasons to buck the trend. 

The estate, meanwhile, ought to make up around 35 per cent of the volume - and that seems like being a minority which merits membership. Not only are the dividends in interior space and (arguably) looks well worth the premium, the roomier body probably better suits the unflappable, unashamedly big-boned identity of the chassis tune. 

Alternatively, if you prefer your estates to come with a bit more vim at turn-in, the as yet untested passive sports suspension ushers the Mondeo 10mm closer to the road and swaps out the shocks and springs for firmer alternatives. Potentially, in a car striving to completely fill out the middle ground, that may yet prove to be the happy medium. 

Ford Mondeo Estate 1.5T EcoBoost Titanium

Price £23,495; 0-62mph 9.3 seconds; Top speed 135mph; Economy 47.9mpg; CO2 137g/km; Kerb weight 1504kg; Engine 4 cyls, 1498cc, petrol, turbocharged; Power 158bhp at 6000rpm; Torque 177lb ft at 1500-4000rpm; Gearbox 6-spd manual

9 October 2014
. . . if it's anywhere close to the real economy of the car. But many small petrol cars, don't offer any better figures. There are quite actually a number of smaller cars with smaller engines, that don't manage to achieve 40 mpg. So if such a large estate can exceed 40. That's actually pretty impressive. The difference between the petrol and the diesel may be around 10 mpg - in real figures. So the arithmetic depends on how many miles you drive.

9 October 2014
And given that carried the Ecoboost label too it seems unlikely they'll have achieved a 10-15% improvement.

"There is a price to pay at the business end, of course - but it’s fractional. In the 1.5-litre EcoBoost petrol we tested, the estate emitted 3g/km more CO2 than the five-door, was less than 1mpg thirstier and 0.1 second slower to 62mph."

Is there any chance you could post the full result of that emission test? Given the manufacturers figures are bunk the test you did is probably more informative even if it doesn't reflect real world driving.

9 October 2014
.....everyone wants a 1.5 litre estate car with Ecoboost written on it cos that's almost too sexy and not at all indicative of someone who has given up on life and settled for something revoltingly mediocre on every level. Jesus.


9 October 2014
Winston Churchill wrote:

.....everyone wants a 1.5 litre estate car with Ecoboost written on it cos that's almost too sexy and not at all indicative of someone who has given up on life and settled for something revoltingly mediocre on every level. Jesus.

You never have any constructive or good to say about any of cars and also seem to have to post saying one is for people who have given up and another is for people with no imagination. i would like to see you go design a car and get it to market.Your so great it would propably be perfect I suppose. Its no harm saying ones opinion like if they like or do not like a car but you are just an annoying troll and no one here really wants your silly opinions about what you think a car says.
The new Mondeo for instance. How could you call that bland or boring. A Passat or Avensis is boring the new Mondeo certainly ain,t. And Fords are not bought by people who have giving up on life they are bought by lots of different people who buy then for lots of different reasons. So mister know it all please if you have nothing constructive to say don,t bother saying it.

10 October 2014
FastRenaultFan wrote:
Winston Churchill wrote:

.....everyone wants a 1.5 litre estate car with Ecoboost written on it cos that's almost too sexy and not at all indicative of someone who has given up on life and settled for something revoltingly mediocre on every level. Jesus.

You never have any constructive or good to say about any of cars and also seem to have to post saying one is for people who have given up and another is for people with no imagination. i would like to see you go design a car and get it to market.Your so great it would propably be perfect I suppose. Its no harm saying ones opinion like if they like or do not like a car but you are just an annoying troll and no one here really wants your silly opinions about what you think a car says.
The new Mondeo for instance. How could you call that bland or boring. A Passat or Avensis is boring the new Mondeo certainly ain,t. And Fords are not bought by people who have giving up on life they are bought by lots of different people who buy then for lots of different reasons. So mister know it all please if you have nothing constructive to say don,t bother saying it.

I do apologise for my opinions. Oh no, hang on, I dont. At all. If your idea of a nice car is a Ford Mondeo estate and this is what you lust after then, in my opinion, you are a dullard and gave no place on a motoring forum.


9 October 2014
the exterior of the Mondeo with the interior and material quality of the Passat. Given that the Mondeo no longer has a sporting edge and that I have to sit in the car for hours I'd take the Passat.

9 October 2014
Picture 2 - is that something falling off the underside of the Mondeo? A list of £23500 doesn't seem that much for a Mondeo Titanium Estate, give it a few months and should be pretty decent price after discount. As for Ecoboost economy, my previous mk2.5 1.6tdi Focus averaged almost 10mpg MORE than my current Focus which boasts Fords very latest fuel saving tech. Would hate to think what a 1.5T Mondeo estate returns in the real world.

9 October 2014
So after the apparently underwhelming Ecosport (which I like btw) this is another new Ford that doesn`t go to the top of the class. If they are watering down the driving dynamics but still not competing on quality what USP do these cars have? Is this not the path that Peugeot took a few years back?

9 October 2014
From the report I can only assume that Ford have produced a good but average car for the average person just like the Sierra and Cortina did previously. Except that nowadays not many people are satisfied with being average and they don't want to spend their hard earned wages on a car that reminds them of their status. After all 25k is not an in significant amount of money. For the minimum extra outlay it sounds like the Passat does exactly what the Mondeo doesn't do in a car. Make you feel like you made it.

9 October 2014
Reading most of the comments here you would think that some people wants and expects golden Elephants. The Mondeo is a very good allround car and by the reports so far this new model would be as successful as the others, I think there are a lot of disingenuous comments here. I wonder they are from rival manufacturers fearing more losses in market share?

Well done Ford, for setting another benchmark in the sector. The Passat is an overpriced VW for BMW money....

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