Limited-run swansong to the 991-generation 911 makes use of GT3-sourced 4.0-litre flat-six making 503bhp
Tom Morgan, deputy digital editor
17 April 2019

Porsche has released UK-specific details of the 911 Speedster: a retro-inspired send-off to the outgoing '991' generation of the sports car.

The Speedster is now available to order here priced from £211,599 inclusive of VAT, almost exactly £100,000 more than the existing GT3.

First revealed in production form at last month's New York motor show, the soft-top Speedster is the first to be developed by Porsche's motorsport division. It arrives with the same 4.0-litre flat-six as the current 911 GT3 and GT3 RS, and receives individual throttle bodies similar to the 911 GT3 R race car for improved response under acceleration. 

The naturally-aspirated engine revs to 9000rpm, develops 503bhp and 346lb ft of torque, and is paired exclusively with a six-speed manual gearbox. The Speedster promises a 192mph top speed and can crack 0-60mph in 3.8 seconds. 

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The performance-focused Speedster uses a chassis based on the current GT3, with which it shares the same rear axle steering, dynamic engine mounts and 20in centre-lock alloy wheels. It has a low-cut front windscreen and twin streamliners behind the cabin that have become emblematic of the Speedster range.

Weight saving measures include manual operation for the fabric roof, and ceramic brakes are standard. Body panels, including the front luggage lid, are made from carbon fiber composite, and air conditioning is omitted as standard (though it can be added back in as a no-cost option). Lightened door panels inside the cabin help reduce weight further, with fabric door pulls and cargo nets helping the Speedster to weigh in at 1465kg.

Originally teased last year in concept form for Porsche's 70th anniversary, this latest model now becomes the ninth 911 to bear the Speedster name. It becomes the final form of the 991-generation 911, the 992-generation model having launched at the end of 2018.

The Speedster will be limited to just 1948 examples, in a nod to the year the Porsche 356 first went on sale. That number is significantly higher than for the 997-generation car that was the last to carry the Speedster name; just 356 were produced, using an engine shared with the 3.8-litre Carrera GTS.

Buyers of the 911 Speedster can opt to add the Heritage Edition trim, also on display, which comprises exterior decals inspired by the 356 racers of the 1960s, satin grey wheel paint, black brake calipers and a retro-inspired brown leather interior. The design pack add a full £15,302 to the price of the car. 

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Comments
12

17 April 2019

 Yes, I’d say this is the ideal amount of power and torque, any more is wasted, if your not happy with this level on public roads, you need to go racing or at least do track days to get your fix of high speeds.

Peter Cavellini.

17 April 2019

Alot of money but I'm wondering if it'll be more secondhand due to waiting lists, love to be a Porsche salesman.

On a another note I've always wondered how car companies make money with such high development costs but then you realise 1948 sales will gross over £400 million!

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

17 April 2019

You had better be good friends with a Porsche dealer or, prepared to pay a massive premium for a "used" one.

Citroëniste.

17 April 2019

generally GT3 RS cars such as this Speedster will not be sold to enthusiasts but the dealer principals mates. They will then generally reappear in the showroom second hand with a price tag normally at least £100,000 above list.

Wj

17 April 2019

Like the GT4’s, GT3’s,and GT3RS’s in many Canadian Porsche dealers that have been sitting there since 2016 and are not sold! Odd thing is they are all still at $$$ over list ! ??

This is nice but a Litchfield C4 cabrio would be faster at half the price 

Madmac

17 April 2019

Same in the USA, dealers happy to sit on unsold GT products certain in the knowledge that 10yrs from now they will have realised a tidy profit. Think about it, private buyer pays for the car and keeps it 6-10 years and sells at a profit, why can't the dealer be the buyer and do the same. My local Lexus dealer has two unsold LFA, and they have never been offered for sale! The dealer principle, a genuine car guy who attends our local cars and coffee has no intention of offering them for sale - yet!

17 April 2019

Indeed many do, but the majority go into the private collections of serial purchasers. Porsche dealers are rightfully called out for the 'shady' practises we so often see, but most cars go to dedicated owners. Kudos to Porsche for increasing the build numbers on this car. GT3 touring aside, Porsche has supplied the market with way more GT3 this time round, and here in the USA delivery mileage cars can be had for $5-10k over MSRP and the bubble has only just started to deflate.

17 April 2019

Madness.

The best option - find and buy 997 GTS with manual gearbox. It may not have 500hp, but the 408 it has are more then enough AND you get the good old Porsche feeling.

17 April 2019

Somewhat on subject. A friend who does a lot of track time at Sebring and Miami in his GT3 recently looked to trade it back to the supplying Porsche dealer against a 2019 GT3RS. His GT3 had 39k miles no accidents but regular track time. He was unable to get what he considered a sensible offer from the dealer who stated 'customers want non tracked GT3's when buying used, we would struggle to retail it'!

7 May 2019
Boris9119 wrote:

Somewhat on subject. A friend who does a lot of track time at Sebring and Miami in his GT3 recently looked to trade it back to the supplying Porsche dealer against a 2019 GT3RS. His GT3 had 39k miles no accidents but regular track time. He was unable to get what he considered a sensible offer from the dealer who stated 'customers want non tracked GT3's when buying used, we would struggle to retail it'!

Your friends dealer wasn’t doing his job, he made no suggestions I assume to try selling it through a Porsche Club, there’s bound to be loads of them wherein there might be an interested party who also do Track days and aren’t bothered if it’s done track stuff, they know what to expect, and I assume your friends valuation of his car was realistic?

Peter Cavellini.

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