From £34,4509
We test Jaguar's first entrant into the crossover market, the F-Pace, in its base 2.0-litre diesel form

Our Verdict

Jaguar F-Pace 2.0d R-Sport

Jaguar takes a typically sporting approach to its F-Pace but it isn't enough to better its sibling - the Land Rover Discovery Sport - as of yet

What is it?

The entry-level variant to Jaguar’s new F-Pace crossover. Although entry-level is a pretty loose term here: yes this is the 2.0-litre diesel model that provides the way into the F-Pace range, but our test car has a few options that’ll lift it above the first model in. Here it’s mated to an all-wheel-drive system (rear-drive is cheaper), it has an eight-speed auto transmission (a six-speed manual is standard) and it runs on adaptive dampers (conventional passive dampers are the base option). But for now, at least, this is the most meagre F-Pace that’s available to us: and it’s representative of the model that will prove the most popular in the range.

In its mechanical make up it’s the same as the 3.0-litre V6 of our feature drive. Which means it’s based on an 80% aluminium architecture shared with the XE and XF executive saloons, although the F-Pace runs to its own wheelbase and tracks. Suspension is by double wishbones at the front, and an integral link (more complex, effective and expensive than a multi-link) at the rear. It’s a sound setup for giving good dynamics. 

At 4.7m long the F-Pace is fairly lengthy in its class, where it competes against the likes of the BMW X3, Audi Q5 and, crucially from a dynamic perspective, the heroically able Porsche Macan. The whole F-Pace range starts at around £37,000 and runs to over £50,000.

What's it like?

Because it’s quite big on the outside, the F-Pace is an accommodating car inside, too. Jaguar is particularly pleased with the 650-litre luggage capacity, while the rear seats are plenty big enough for tall adults to sit behind tall adults in the front. In terms of cabin feel, the F-Pace is comfortably finished at this price level – as you get towards the top-end of F-Pace pricing, some of the materials start to bear less favourable comparison with rivals – but against its price rivals, the cheaper 2.0-litre fares rather better. 

The 178bhp diesel is Jaguar Land Rover’s new Ingenium unit, which in its earliest incarnation was quite grumbly. But clearly work has been done because in the F-Pace it fires to a quiet idle. The eight-speed automatic is one of the best in production, so shifts cleanly and smoothly, but this is a big car for a 2.0-litre engine: it’d be heavier if it weren’t aluminium, but the kerbweight is still 1775kg. The 2.0 rarely struggles, but if you put the adaptive drive selector into Eco mode it’s reluctant to downshift, so you have to pull changes yourself if you don’t want to feel like you’re driving through treacle.

But if there’s an upside to having a smaller engine under the hood – and there is – then it’s the fact that it’s a more agile car than either the V6 petrol or diesel variants. That makes the F-Pace, which is already one of the most dynamically capable cars in the class, steer with extra verve in its 2.0-litre format, holding a line more keenly. It has less punch down a straight, of course – the 3.0-litre diesel is the effortless F-Pace boss in that respect – but in daily driving, the motorway haul, the trips through town that constitute the way we go about our business most of the time, it’s fine. And when you do choose to extend the engine to make progress, it retains its smoothness. 

Smoothness is a word you’d associate with the ride, too. Jaguar tends to make cars ride well and the F-Pace is no exception, even though it rides on relatively big wheels – our test car was on 20in rims but you can specify up to 22s, which Jaguar says has the same depth of sidewall than most rivals’ 20s. And they’re not runflats, so it’s smooth. If the German rivals do have an area where they excel, it’s usually in high-speed straight-line stability. Our route didn’t have many tests of that, but the F-Pace never felt nervous to us.

Should I buy one?

If you do buy an F-Pace, this one is the most likely – it’s the cheapest and lowest emitting of the lot, after all; although Jaguar hasn’t been shy with the F-Pace’s pricing. At the £40,360 our R-Sport test car wants, you can get into a six-cylinder BMW X3 or Audi Q5, though it still undercuts a Porsche Macan, which was the car Jaguar benchmarked, dynamically, in the first instance. Obviously we’ll want  back-to-back test to determine which is better to drive, but the Jaguar is a car with keen steering, fine dynamism, a smooth ride, and is an easy SUV in which to find yourself in a comfortable driving rhythm. That it’s roomy, accommodating and refined too makes it a sound choice.

Jaguar F-Pace 2.0d AWD R Sport

Location Montenegro; On sale Now; Price £40,360; Engine 4cyls, 1999cc, diesel; Power   178bhp at 4000rpm; Torque 318lb ft at 1750-2500rpm; Gearbox 8-spd automatic; Kerb weight 1775kg; Top speed 129mph ; 0-60mph 8.2sec; Economy 53.3mpg (combined); CO2/tax band 139g/km, 25%

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Comments
19

6 April 2016
JLR certainly seem to be in their stride at the moment as this is yet again another competent class leading / close to class leading (depending on your opinion) vehicle. Undoubtedly it will be a sales success.

I wonder how it will impact on the sales of it's cousin Evoke? Okay not quite as style concious but better packaged and what appears to be as good in every other way.

 

 

It's all about the twisties........

6 April 2016
I was all set to order a Discovery Sport at the beginning of this year but kept questioning the amount of personal tax I would have to pay and was there an alternative, as whilst it ticked all the practicality boxes it didn’t excite me enough to commit. Briefly looked at the Mitsubishi PHev but very quickly dismissed for lots of reasons. When the pricing was announced for the F-Pace, I was pleasantly surprised that it was only a couple of thousand more than the Discovery Sport. Here was the vehicle that ticked all the practicality boxes, but also made you forget how much BIK you had to pay to have one. I have never ordered a vehicle without first driving it, but sufficient confidence in JLR products to have taken the plunge. Just got to be patient now, waiting until later in the year for delivery

6 April 2016
I should really want this car - as I should have wanted the XE. This car really should have it all but there's something I just can't warm to. Maybe it's the name that infects all my other objective appraisals but it's more likely to be the incredibly, and overtly bland styling. Why so bland? that's not saying it's bad looking, just not elegant like a Jag should be. I love the XF and XJ by the way.

A34

6 April 2016
... on the Q5 is quoted as 1730-1880 Kg, versus 1775 for this model. Assuming the 4WD and auto weighs a bit, the Jag seems to be about the same weight. Which is either bad news (alu chassis squandered) or good news (for an A5.5 sized car) depending on your point of view.

Like the rest of the car though - well done Jag. Saw one on the A40 over Easter and it looked good!

6 April 2016
I was expecting this to be in the range rover sport class rather than against the Discovery sport. Interesting that the article mentions BMW, Audi and Porsche. I would like to see another range rover product in any back to back comparison.

6 April 2016
Seems like a decent posher Discovery Sport alternative. I read that 1 in 3 orders have been from woman so good to see Jag transcending its male image with this model. Does seem a shade pricey though.

6 April 2016
Anyone in Dearborn regreting now selling JLR ?

6 April 2016
the instigator wrote:

Anyone in Dearborn regreting now selling JLR ?

JLR Wouldn't have had the investment that Tata have put in, so probably wouldn't have all these products released

7 April 2016
superstevie wrote:
the instigator wrote:

Anyone in Dearborn regreting now selling JLR ?

JLR Wouldn't have had the investment that Tata have put in, so probably wouldn't have all these products released

Ford certainly had the money, or could have found it; they just didn't or couldn't nurture a cohesive vision for what they had in their hands... even after off-loading AM and Volvo.

That said it would be interesting to learn what the payback period is for each of the new model programs Tata has released the investment for... let's hope China and other emerging "luxury car rich" markets do not implode just as the train is leaving the station...

6 April 2016
Looks wise, I like it, although the badge in the grill, and the plastic bit bit around it looks naff. Interior looks ok as well. Sounds like it is a great drive. The price, like all JLR products recently, seems steep. That used to be Jag's USP in the past, where you could then ignore the odd dodgy interior plastic, or not quite as good infotainment system.

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