There is no bolder testament to the inherent rightness of the Range Rover’s design and longevity that, as the model entered its 43rd year, it only then launched its fourth generation. Each of which, remember, has been launched with the company under different ownership.

This latest Range Rover’s internal codename is L405, and it is as revolutionary as at any time in the iconic 4x4’s history. Most interesting from an engineering standpoint is that it receives an aluminium monocoque; most interesting from a sales perspective is that it is now, from base model to range-topper, unashamedly a luxury model.

Car manufacturers are rather catching up with the market on this one; there are plenty of models that are executive cars first and SUVs second, but not ones that are out-and-out luxury cars first and 4x4s second.

Land Rover wouldn’t countenance that the 4x4 aspect to the Range Rover is second to anything, but let’s be clear: when your base model costs £76,350, you’re dealing in luxury metal. Let’s see how that blends with its other purposes.

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