The SUV gets early praise for comfort and ease of use, even on shorter trips, but the infotainment has some troubles
30 May 2016

I’m into my second month with the Tucson and, generally speaking, everything is going well.

It probably helps that the car has had an easy introduction to the swing of things, with a lot of to-ing and fro-ing between home and airport parking — although later this month I’ve got a trip to the Isle of Skye planned that ought to be a proper test of its practicality and comfort.

The early word on that is good; the last (or first) two people to experience travel time in the rear seats seemed satisfied. But that was for 15 minutes; after seven hours of back-agitating motorway furrowing, we’ll know for sure.

I should also have a clearer picture of fuel economy. At the moment, it’s hovering around 38mpg, which isn’t exactly spectacular for a 1.7-litre engine with a claimed combined figure beyond 60mpg.

Admittedly, that’s off the back of chugging repeatedly between home and Heathrow, so I’m going to hold off on my disappointed face until the results come in from some longer motorway cruises.

Otherwise, as with so many other things in modern life, I’ve been mostly preoccupied with the stuff that appears on the Tucson’s infotainment screen. Here, of course, is where the niggles ruck up like a bed sheet on Sunday morning.

By and large, happily, it’s fine. Being fast and responsive in the processor makes it easy to forgive underlying faults in the software — and so far my cringes have been modest.

The worst — and bear with me here — is rather modest. It involves the ringtone that plays through the speakers when you receive a phone call while attached via Bluetooth.

Most cars will simply relay whatever the phone does through the speakers. But the Hyundai suddenly comes over all clever and plays from its own selection of ringtones instead.

Which would be fine, but said selection appears to have been cut from a child’s nightmare involving clowns and circuses and the torturing of keyboards. It may be only a minor issue, but it’s a teeth-grinding one.

My gripe with the sat-nav is on a similar scale. It, too, is very user-friendly, and it’s appreciably quicker than that of my previous car (a Ford Mondeo) in accepting an address.

However, once it’s programmed and you’re on the move, the Tucson blots its copybook by continually suggesting alternative routes — whether you want them or not.

“Well, that’s helpful, Luc,” I can hear you all saying. And you’d be right if the alternatives actually came with an advantage attached.

But like a drunk friend directing you home from a nightclub, the Tucson has a brilliant way of offering you a new route that even it admits will take longer than the way it’s already plotted.

I suspect that’s due to an internal difference between what it’s calculating and what it’s displaying. However, I’m not yet sufficiently attached to the Tucson that I want to wilfully spend more time in it than I already do.

It’s early days, though.

Read our first report here

Hyundai Tucson 1.7 CRDi SE Nav

Mileage 3865 Price £23,145 Price as tested £23,765 Economy 38.2mpg Faults None Expenses None

Luc Lacey

Our Verdict

Hyundai Tucson

The Hyundai Tucson is a stylish crossover which focuses mainly on easy-going real-world ability, but is that enough to turn people's heads away from the Nissan Qashqai and Seat Ateca?

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Comments
11

30 May 2016
Its probably because in the sat nav preferences you have it set to plot the shortest route, its offering the alternative because that one meets that criteria more than the original route even though the delays mean it will take longer. It appears to be offering you a choice of preference, more miles but quicker or less miles but slower.

Also if you just heard on the radio traffic report that they had cleared a broken down lorry you may judge to take the currently slower route as in your judgement by the time you get to where the hold up was, it will have all got moving and you won't be delayed. Its handy to have to information and options to choose.

30 May 2016
had an iX35 and must say it was near tiop of the range and a load of unreliable rubbish pleased to get rid and my Range Rover Sport is very nearly as economical .I used to get 32 to 34mpg with the manual 2lt awd diesel had five rear parkinfg sensors replaced faulty door lock when door would iopen often at roundabouts 3 times and could not find fault rear light faulty and gear knob replaced the head restraints are from the Sportage asnd not made for the IX35 so was uncomfortable as you had to recline the seat backto get modest levels of comfort.would suggest you save more for a Disc Sport or X3

30 May 2016
annoying that you can't edit now.

30 May 2016
Yet another diesel SUV choking our cities. Enough is enough. Time to raise duty on diesel I think.

30 May 2016
scrap wrote:

Yet another diesel SUV choking our cities. Enough is enough. Time to raise duty on diesel I think.

30 May 2016
Yes, and it is becoming rather difficult to find petrol cars in the ''yew-kay'', especially when looking for a used car. AutoCar and all of the other review sites consistently recommend diesel but NEVER once mention the health,environmental, and noise-pollution impacts of it.

30 May 2016
ClassAxe wrote:

AutoCar and all of the other review sites consistently recommend diesel but NEVER once mention the health,environmental, and noise-pollution impacts of it.

Or their inherent reliability problems. Especially at 3 years+ of age when the warranty usually is finished.

Where has all Japanese design went to?

30 May 2016
Are you seriously suggesting the vastly superior selling diesel engine in this type of car is down to Autocar and the like?
There's a reason why diesel is superior in cars like these - I don't think Joe Public is as stupid as people make him out to be. With reference to the above report, yes the diesel Hyundai isn't the best choice for economy, that's because their 1.7tdi is getting on a bit. Yes you can update engines with new software and introduce stop/start tech, but you can only go so far. You can get more efficent figures from a smaller modern diesel engine. As for those wanting petrol - have you looked at the efficiency of Hyundai's petrol offering in this car? And those who complain about diesel reliability after 3 years - well every car has reliability issues after 3 years but if you do buy this Hyundai, you're allowed to feel smug as you'll benefit from a 5 year warranty (or 7 years if you buy it's Kia counterpart).

30 May 2016
scotty5 wrote:

Are you seriously suggesting the vastly superior selling diesel engine in this type of car is down to Autocar and the like?
There's a reason why diesel is superior in cars like these - I don't think Joe Public is as stupid as people make him out to be. With reference to the above report, yes the diesel Hyundai isn't the best choice for economy, that's because their 1.7tdi is getting on a bit. Yes you can update engines with new software and introduce stop/start tech, but you can only go so far. You can get more efficent figures from a smaller modern diesel engine. As for those wanting petrol - have you looked at the efficiency of Hyundai's petrol offering in this car? And those who complain about diesel reliability after 3 years - well every car has reliability issues after 3 years but if you do buy this Hyundai, you're allowed to feel smug as you'll benefit from a 5 year warranty (or 7 years if you buy it's Kia counterpart).

I wouldn't feel smug as I inhale the particulate matter and noxious gases. Perhaps you might become one of the (ever increasing) numbers of people developing lung cancer (having never smoked)....all linked to diesel!

30 May 2016
Those short airport trips sound like a gross misuse of a vehicle like this. Surely a petrol supermini would do a better job? Yeah, I know this is a road test, but there must be plenty of buyers getting 38mpg in SUVs when a more suitable vehicle would be better for the environment and running costs. Electric would be great for these?

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