Mild hybrid variant will join petrol PHEV to provide two electrified versions of next-gen SUV in 2019

Land Rover is set to launch a diesel-hybrid Range Rover Evoque in its next-generation line-up, due next year.

Six different Evoque development cars spotted testing have been registered as using a 2.0-litre diesel-hybrid engine, according to an online database.

2019 Range Rover Evoque details

The plans tally with Jaguar Land Rover's announcement last year that it wanted to electrify all of its models by 2020.

We know the Evoque is set to launch with 1.5-litre plug-in hybrid, but previous research projects by Jaguar Land Rover suggest the 2.0-litre diesel powertrain is likely to use a 48V mild-hybrid set-up.

We expect it to echo a JLR prototype called Concept_e MHEV. This mild hybrid is based on a Range Rover Evoque donor vehicle and features a prototype 89bhp diesel engine with a 48V electrical system.

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It incorporates a 15kW crank-integrated motor with a disconnect clutch within a hybrid module sandwiched between the engine and a nine-speed transmission. The motor-generator is powered by an advanced 48V electrical system and a 48V lithium ion battery.

The brand’s decision to use diesel power in its hybrid Evoque contrasts a move it made with the larger Range Rover hybrid, which swapped from diesel-electric to petrol-electric power in its latest update.

It also contrasts the route taken by rivals, such as Volvo, which will produce a hybrid version of its Evoque rival, the XC40, with petrol power.

Diesel has come under pressure in recent months, with the UK Government announcing raised taxes for diesel models in a bid to lower the number of them on the road. But diesel cars, particularly those assisted with electric power, are still considered among the most efficient for long distance drivers.

The mild hybrid Evoque will likely offer the very best economy figures and lowest CO2 output in its range. It will lend its electrified diesel powertrain to sibling models in the Discovery Sport and Jaguar E-Pace ranges.

Jaguar Land Rover’s wide-ranging adoption of electric power comes as part of a heavy push towards electrification. JLR CEO Ralf Speth confirmed last year that its electrified model range would "embrace fully electric, plug-in hybrid and mild hybrid vehicles".

The brand will launch its first electric model, the I-Pace, into the market this July. It will also produce an all-electric XJ and electric Road Rover in 2019.

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Comments
29

26 February 2018

Seems logical that medium to large SUV’s should be hybrid......?

Peter Cavellini.

26 February 2018

which makes sense to precisely nobody. This decision smacks more of JLR wanting to make use of diesel engine manufacturing capacity than customer focus. For a hybrid, the extra weight of batteries needs to be offset by the lightest possible ICE, not the heaviest!

Robbo

Aussie Rob - a view from down under

26 February 2018
Aussierob wrote:

which makes sense to precisely nobody. This decision smacks more of JLR wanting to make use of diesel engine manufacturing capacity than customer focus.

One can understand their frustration! |They are also being penalised for zze Zermanzz crime! They did not come out with ludicrous mpg figure or used cheat methods to pass emission regulations. Ze Zermanzz got away with it but JLR and its diesel sales are still suffering from the consequences. 

26 February 2018
shortbread wrote:

They are also being penalised for zze Zermanzz crime! They did not come out with ludicrous mpg figure or used cheat methods to pass emission regulations. Ze Zermanzz got away with it but JLR and its diesel sales are still suffering from the consequences. 

They are being penalised because, despite the 'cutting-edge aluminium technology', they are so heavy that diesel is the only realistic fuel choice for them in Europe and because they have been very behind in introducing hybrid options.

26 February 2018

The only sensible hybrid is a diesel one - diesels are the most efficient and econmical ICEs, therefore it makes sense to use them for hybrids, even if theyre unfashionable at the moment.

XXXX just went POP.

26 February 2018

I'm JLR have tried a diesel hybrid before but it was a. crap and b. no one bought it because of point a.

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

26 February 2018

If it’s using a 89bhp engine you’d best hope it’s more than a ‘mild’ hybrid. So far this term has meant cars with an integrated stop start system and very limited electric range - think Suzuki’s application. Blimey.

26 February 2018

Desperate attempt to keep it on company car lists as companies lower their co2 ceilings by making something designed to get round the test well, not please the customer. No one in our fleet will be buying an Evoque this year, there isn't one that made the list.

26 February 2018

On the one hand JLR is ahead of the curve with the iPace and on the other it is investing money in diesel hybrids which it is highly likely it will have to write off in the future. They have the new range of ingenium petrol engines as well so why not use them for the hybrid?

26 February 2018

Because diesels are more economical? Hybrid buses are all the rage now as operators aim to show off their green credentials - but you they're diesel hybrids. There's  a reason for that.

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