The public charging infrastructure is not yet ready for the I-Pace's rapid charging capability, but Jaguar says the correct charging points will be in place when the I-Pace goes on sale

British buyers of the Jaguar I-Pace will not be able to achieve the car’s headline 45min 80% rapid charge time because the UK doesn't yet have the infrastructure required to enable it, according to reports.

Since the start of 2018, some European countries including Germany have been receiving chargers with up to 350kW of energy, with 400 due across the continent by 2020. But, reports in the Sunday Times suggest that 100kW chargers, which enable that 45min charge, won’t be installed in the UK until long after the I-Pace arrives this July.

As such, British I-Pace owners will need closer to 90mins to replenish the car's 90kWh batteries to 80% by using a 50kW plug, which is the most common type of charger currently found here. The I-Pace will need about two hours to fully recharge from empty with 50kW charging.

Jaguar I-Pace concept first drive review

Unlike Tesla, which offers 120kW Superchargers to its customers, Jaguar won’t provide its own charging solutions for the I-Pace. Buyers wanting the fastest charge times will therefore have to rely on chargers supplied by other companies.

Chargemaster, one of the UK’s biggest charging point providers, is already working on 150kW chargers for its network but doesn’t expect them to be installed before the end of 2018.

The company’s spokesman told Autocar that the technology is in the “development pipeline” but that there are not currently any affordably priced connectors that can support multiple different car models with 100kW charging.

However, a Jaguar spokesman told Autocar that charging points offering 100Kw or more would be available to the British public by the time the I-Pace goes on sale in the summer, but could not confirm which company would provide such charging points.

Chargemester added that addressing the shortage of more powerful charging points should be a priority for the Government in order to allow private charge point companies to roll out their latest technology.

The spokesman said that while the Government’s commitment to provide £200 million for the rollout of charge points via its Charging Infrastructure Fund is welcome, the money would be better off going towards “investment in grid stability, upgrading existing networks and lowering costs associated with the connectors”.

He believes that the government money could actually “hinder the strong private investment we are currently receiving because investors will wait to see what effect the government money will have".

“The energy sector is really waiting for more government involvement,” he said.

The government has established an On-street Residential Charging Scheme that can be used to pay for 75% of charger installation costs, but the spokesman pointed out that councils may be unable to provide even 25% of money towards new chargers because of the Government’s ongoing austerity measures.

“If it will cost a council £100,000 to install some charge points, that means they still need to fund £25,000,” he said. “Charge points are unlikely to be as high of a priority as other issues, such as social care, so councils are less likely to do this.”

Although British I-Pace owners won’t be able to top up their cars at the fastest charge rate, the spokesman said that it should be of little concern to the vast majority of people. “Our data shows that most people use their chargers 17 times a month,” he said. “It shows that the very fastest charge times will only be of concern to a tiny proportion of people.”

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Comments
23

1 February 2018

Electric car chargers and charging points should not be subsidised by the UK taxpayer.

1 February 2018
max1e6 wrote:

Electric car chargers and charging points should not be subsidised by the UK taxpayer.

Yes they should.

1 February 2018

What a comedy act ! So the smug industry executives think Musk is a joke, I think the jokes on them ! Because he wasn't a "car guy", he understood what was needed, and built himself a charging network in the US and then throughout mainland Europe and the UK. I was sitting next to an ex CFO of a major car maker at dinner a few weeks ago and asked him how we were going to charge cars in the UK, his answer "don't worry yourself, it will all be OK ", when I brought up Tesla's Supercharger stations, he laughed, "Tesla won't exist in two years time, they are a nothing, they don't even make batteries, at best they are a battery packager". Musk isn't a "car guy", he doesn't understand the industry !

Well without doubt the iPace is a lovely thing, and it will be made with an air of European quality which the Tesla does not exude, but when I'm heading home to Surrey, and I'm in Scotland with my iPace needing a charge, and I roll passed a Tesla Supercharger Station whilst looking for a public charging post that may or may not work, I might just think that I could have lived with the less "quality" product ? 

1 February 2018
Ravon wrote:

Well without doubt the iPace is a lovely thing, and it will be made with an air of European quality which the Tesla does not exude, but when I'm heading home to Surrey, and I'm in Scotland with my iPace needing a charge, and I roll passed a Tesla Supercharger Station whilst looking for a public charging post that may or may not work, I might just think that I could have lived with the less "quality" product ? 

Manufacturers should not be making bespoke chargers. They should be forced to make their cars fit a common standard. If they don't then every time we change our cars we'll be looking at potentially buying a new home charger, and throwing out our old one. And for remote chargers it will become a farce if every service station/office/shopping-centre have to maintain a different charger for each vehicle brand.

From what I can tell, the remote chargers can be made somewhat compatible. We have charging points at work (I live in the US), that are in use for many different brands, including Tesla. I'm sure these are 'slow-chargers', but it shows that compatibility is already possible. Likely Tesla lock their SC's down to their own vehicles, but they could be 'encouraged' to change that on FRAND terms.

The difficulty will be how governments enforce compatibility without unfairly penalizing Tesla after they've made such a significant up front investment.

1 February 2018

Why was my comment stating ‘17 times a month not being less than every other day’, which was originally a verbatim quote by Mr Callow in the article (now removed)?

 If he said it then my comment reflected on him, not on Autocar’s reporting. 

1 February 2018

Ravon is 100% right. Jaguar's proposition is going to fail the moment the battery runs out of power. I cant wait to see Autocar do its first test drive down the M40. Undoubtedly, even when they run out of power at the High Wycombe junction, their bias towards JLR products and anti-Tesla attitude will continue to prevail. 

Not sure I agree with Ravon though on Jaguar quality. By comparison with the two F-Types I've owned from new, My Tesla Model S lives in a different league. Anyone considering the iPace will undoubtedly suffer depreciation typical of Jags or other EVs. Meanwhile, even 200,000km Teslas that have been used as Taxis in Amsterdam have a superior residuals to all other vehicles in the category. 

@Autocar - You really need you to stop your anti-Tesla bias. The recent article on EV's in your feature story was so one-sided and biased it brought shame on journalism and the magazine. 

 

Lotus Evora 400

2 February 2018
wheelman wrote:

Ravon is 100% right. Jaguar's proposition is going to fail the moment the battery runs out of power. I cant wait to see Autocar do its first test drive down the M40. Undoubtedly, even when they run out of power at the High Wycombe junction, their bias towards JLR products and anti-Tesla attitude will continue to prevail. 

Not sure I agree with Ravon though on Jaguar quality. By comparison with the two F-Types I've owned from new, My Tesla Model S lives in a different league. Anyone considering the iPace will undoubtedly suffer depreciation typical of Jags or other EVs. Meanwhile, even 200,000km Teslas that have been used as Taxis in Amsterdam have a superior residuals to all other vehicles in the category. 

@Autocar - You really need you to stop your anti-Tesla bias. The recent article on EV's in your feature story was so one-sided and biased it brought shame on journalism and the magazine. 

 

 

What a load of nonsense. Firstly have you ever tried to close the door on a Tesla Model X? If you manage to close it well done you. Half the time the doors won't shut properly. Or have you suffered from the body work not being welded together properly? Plenty of Tesla owners have logged all sorts of complaints. Their build quality is pathetic not in the same league as even a Fiat product which is normally second from bottom of every reliabilty survey going. The reason Tesla's are running after 200,000 miles is because the electric motors don't give up the ghost like an ICE. All electric cars should go for 200,000 miles. That said I wonder how many battery packs the average Dutch Tesla driver will get through? Once you remove the ICE you remove huge amounts of complexity from a car, so that fact that Tesla is one of the worst performing brands for reliability should be a serious concern. Jaguar on the other hand is normally much higher up the table.

As for the recharging point issue all car makers will have the same problem unless the Government start to lead on this. I know a group which includes VW and Ford are talking about building their own network, but that's not really the answer as it will just lead to another group installing different types of charger, and ultimately it will be pointless as the government will mandate that they all have to be open access to all brands..... Your anti Jaguar bile is something to behold.....

 

2 February 2018
wheelman wrote:

Ravon is 100% right. Jaguar's proposition is going to fail the moment the battery runs out of power. I cant wait to see Autocar do its first test drive down the M40. Undoubtedly, even when they run out of power at the High Wycombe junction, their bias towards JLR products and anti-Tesla attitude will continue to prevail. 

Not sure I agree with Ravon though on Jaguar quality. By comparison with the two F-Types I've owned from new, My Tesla Model S lives in a different league. Anyone considering the iPace will undoubtedly suffer depreciation typical of Jags or other EVs. Meanwhile, even 200,000km Teslas that have been used as Taxis in Amsterdam have a superior residuals to all other vehicles in the category. 

@Autocar - You really need you to stop your anti-Tesla bias. The recent article on EV's in your feature story was so one-sided and biased it brought shame on journalism and the magazine. 

 

 

What a load of nonsense. Firstly have you ever tried to close the door on a Tesla Model X? If you manage to close it well done you. Half the time the doors won't shut properly. Or have you suffered from the body work not being welded together properly? Plenty of Tesla owners have logged all sorts of complaints. Their build quality is pathetic not in the same league as even a Fiat product which is normally second from bottom of every reliabilty survey going. The reason Tesla's are running after 200,000 miles is because the electric motors don't give up the ghost like an ICE. All electric cars should go for 200,000 miles. That said I wonder how many battery packs the average Dutch Tesla driver will get through? Once you remove the ICE you remove huge amounts of complexity from a car, so that fact that Tesla is one of the worst performing brands for reliability should be a serious concern. Jaguar on the other hand is normally much higher up the table.

As for the recharging point issue all car makers will have the same problem unless the Government start to lead on this. I know a group which includes VW and Ford are talking about building their own network, but that's not really the answer as it will just lead to another group installing different types of charger, and ultimately it will be pointless as the government will mandate that they all have to be open access to all brands..... Your anti Jaguar bile is something to behold.....

 

2 February 2018
TStag wrote:

wheelman wrote:

Ravon is 100% right. Jaguar's proposition is going to fail the moment the battery runs out of power. I cant wait to see Autocar do its first test drive down the M40. Undoubtedly, even when they run out of power at the High Wycombe junction, their bias towards JLR products and anti-Tesla attitude will continue to prevail. 

Not sure I agree with Ravon though on Jaguar quality. By comparison with the two F-Types I've owned from new, My Tesla Model S lives in a different league. Anyone considering the iPace will undoubtedly suffer depreciation typical of Jags or other EVs. Meanwhile, even 200,000km Teslas that have been used as Taxis in Amsterdam have a superior residuals to all other vehicles in the category. 

@Autocar - You really need you to stop your anti-Tesla bias. The recent article on EV's in your feature story was so one-sided and biased it brought shame on journalism and the magazine. 

 

What a load of nonsense. ...Your anti Jaguar bile is something to behold.....

Ditto your anti-telsa bias, did you not read the first line "My Tesla Model S lives in a different league." he's speaking from experience.

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

2 February 2018
Increase production of the vehicles consumers & government funding grants are demanding? Seems like Tesla are not the only ones with strong demand for new electric cars! Even the new XJ will also be 100% electric. According to UK magazines, the most anticipated vehicle of 2018 is the all electric Jaguar i-pace. UK manufacturers are building electric taxi cabs in Coventry for London. The factories are changing rapidly, further charging investment is clearly necessary from Tfl.

Why don't JLR simply resolve the missing 25% funding gap and fix these CCS motorway constraints? Presently, it takes me 23 minutes to 50% top-up on the motorway traveling the Highlands from Devon. Driven across Europe several times without a drop of oil or cloud of combustion.

We have driven over 100,000 electric miles since 2011. I-miev, Leaf & Model S. Sunderland UK based Nissan began infrastructure supporting Ecotricity's DC network electric highway from 2012.

Local television news in Birmingham has reporting the reopening of car production at Jaguar. The factory has been closed for the past 4 weeks, due to an unexpected fall in local consumer and export demand for diesel engines. SMMT reported confusions over government go ultra low advertising campaigns, as 80% of Jaguar products remain the diesel engine variants. The remaining 1/5th of which are petrol V8 supercharged Jaguar products.

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