Twenty of around 400 stations have been installed, with the UK part of long-term plan

A consortium of German car giants, along with Ford, have begun work on an electric vehicle fast-charging network across Europe, named Ionity.

So far, 20 stations have been completed of a projected 400 charging stations planned by 2020. The network currently stretches along major routes in Germany, Austria and Norway, with 120km between each station. The short-term target is 50 stations by the end of the year.

A spokesman for the network said that that UK will eventually be included in Ionity’s charger network. However, no details have been revealed about how wide the network will be in the UK and how many chargers there will be. "Initial focus will be on the main routes between the metropolitan areas of the most populated European countries, but it is likely that all European countries will become part of the network."

Next year, a further 50 stations will be added to the network, with the project reaching its 400-station target by the end of the decade. This isn’t the final number of stations; more are expected to arrive after this. 

BMW Group, Daimler AG, Ford and the Volkswagen Group, including Audi and Porsche, are all part of the scheme, which is open to other car makers. Even if they do not join the scheme, other manufacturers’ cars can still be charged on the system if they are equipped with the Combined Charging System (CCS). 

CCS is already used by BMW’s i cars and the Volkswagen e-Up and e-Golf. Ford’s electric vehicles and Mercedes’ EQ range will also use the system. Tesla, PSA Group, Nissan and Mitsubishi are not compatible with CCS. A spokesman for the joint venture said: "We support industry standardization with the use of the CCS standard, as it is the most commonly used charging standard that enables the majority of BEV drivers to use the charging network. The network will not be limited to vehicles from a single manufacturer but rather improve the experience for all BEV vehicles with the CCS standard."

Charging capacity of up to 350kW is planned for the network. Tesla Superchargers are currently less than half of this power. The spokesman confirmed that a charge will apply to use the network, but prices will be competitive with existing pay-per-use charger networks. 

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Comments
9

3 November 2017

There needs to be a standard, rather than differing plugs (why oh why do we have this every time - Betamax/VHS?), which is totally absurd, and ALL the chargers, everywhere, need to be rapid chargers.  What on earth point is there in having a trickle charger?  These are only good for homes.  There needs to be no sign-up required, nor any annual or monthly fees.  You should simply be able to pull up at a charger, swipe your debit/credit card, charge (have  a cup of coffee) then go - just like you would at a fuel pump.  I despair that every time something good is created, barriers are put in the way of using it effectively and efficiently because no one appears to have any intelligence at all!  if this is the future, then for god's sake sort it out so that it's simple to use whenever you want.  When I complained to BMW about the charging network, they said that it was nothing to do with them, they just provide the vehicle.  But it is!  It would be like a car manufacturer making a model that uses leaded petrol, and saying, 'There it is, fueling it is nothing to do with us'.  Absurd!

3 November 2017

Although "Despite the current political climate, the UK will be included in Ionity’s charger network." is a pointless statement.

Strange two of the biggest manufacturers aren't mentioned, Renault and GM, but Ford are?

Telsa get onboard, you might need EV friends in 5 years time as you won't be such a driving force.

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

3 November 2017
xxxx wrote:

Strange two of the biggest manufacturers aren't mentioned, Renault and GM, but Ford are?

 

With the sale of Opel-Vauxhall to PSA, GM effectively does not exist in Europe any longer, xxxx.

 

3 November 2017

This is ridiculous, basically the German car industry has conspired with one other high volume car maker to push their system. Now watch the UK car industry (Nissan, Toyota, JLR) plus the French car industry (PSA/ Renault) go in another direction and push their own system! You just know it will happen....

3 November 2017

I may be being something of a wanton visionary here but wouldn't it be useful to have a governing body is Europe that ensured standardisation??

Oh wait.....

Au revoir Eurocrats.  You're so effective.

3 November 2017
marksman99999 wrote:

I may be being something of a wanton visionary here but wouldn't it be useful to have a governing body is Europe that ensured standardisation??

Oh wait.....

Au revoir Eurocrats.  You're so effective.

So true! can't even standardise one little vehicle plug! good value for 10 billion a year...Also "prices will be competitive with existing pay-per-use charger networks" so not competitive at all then.

3 November 2017

Spot on!  If you're old enough (like I am) to remember why Europe got together in the first place, it was all a jolly good idea.  Then they went and thought it would be clever if it became a political union, rather than just trade and standardisation.  Then they went and thought it would be clever to all have the same currency - despite differing fiscal policies!  I can't wait to be out of the crazy club.

3 November 2017

Exactly how were we in the crazy club of having the same currency when we have the pound. 

4 November 2017

I meant I can't wait until we're out of the crazy club that is the EU.

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