Rapid chargers that can top up most EVs to 80% in 30mins are being rolled out in Britain

Shell Recharge is the name given to a new forecourt-based electric car charging system being rolled out by fuel supplier Shell - which lands as plug-in car sales continue to surge.

The company has chosen Britain as the first market to offer its new service, after UK registrations of plug-ins last month increased by 36% compared with September 2016.

Shell will introduce 50kW fast chargers that can top up the batteries of most EVs to 80% in about 30mins, allowing users to drive in and connect their EV or plug-in hybrid vehicle without any pre-arrangement.

The brand is offering the service at its Holloway, Whyteleafe and Derby forecourts first, before rolling out more recharge stations in London and Reading ahead of the year’s end.

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The company’s new service comes soon after it signed an agreement to purchase NewMotion, one of Europe’s largest EV charging providers. The brand is working with Transport for London to boost the presence of chargers in the city, as part of Mayor Sadiq Khan’s plans to encourage a speedier uptake of electric vehicles.

The capital’s deputy mayor of environment and energy, Shirley Rodrigues, said: “With sales of diesel cars declining, it's vital to have charging points for electric vehicles in service stations, car parks and on our streets.

“As the mayor moves towards making London's transport system zero-emission by 2050, TfL is working with boroughs to increase charging infrastructure across our city.”

In an attempt to cut the city’s growing air-quality problem, London will from 23 October introduce its toxicity charge (T-charge), which bans all cars that don’t meet the Euro 4 standard from the city centre.

Oxford is pushing to go further with a full ban on combustion engine cars, although that ruling, which has been proposed by Oxford City Council to start from 2020, has yet to pass a public consultation.

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17

18 October 2017
When oil giants start running electric charging stations then the end of internal combustion as we know it is nigh.

18 October 2017

I agree with Qgravs - this is just poor journalism.  It would also seem to do nothing more than regurtitate the press release they've been fed. Where's the paragraph or two analysis and impact relative to the Tesla Supercharger network and others that are already broadly available across many parts of the UK?  Come on Autocar, you can do better.

Lotus Evora 400

18 October 2017

A fairly fundamental fact is missing from this piece , the cost of a recharge ?

18 October 2017
Ravon wrote:

A fairly fundamental fact is missing from this piece , the cost of a recharge ?

And the announcement that another 20 power stations will need to be built to charge electric cars, if we all want and buy one !!

18 October 2017
A88A wrote:

Ravon wrote:

A fairly fundamental fact is missing from this piece , the cost of a recharge ?

And the announcement that another 20 power stations will need to be built to charge electric cars, if we all want and buy one !!

You forgot a few things. It won't happen overnight, Norway are having no problems and 25% of their car sales are electric, people will charge overnight (there's an oversupply at the moment).

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

18 October 2017

A fact that everyone forgets, it takes between 1-5khw (depends who you ask so the truth is somewhere inbetween I suspect) to make a gallon of petrol so this has to be factored into your calculations too.

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

18 October 2017
xxxx wrote:

A fact that everyone forgets, it takes between 1-5khw (depends who you ask so the truth is somewhere inbetween I suspect) to make a gallon of petrol so this has to be factored into your calculations too.

There is also the diesel consumed to get the fuel to where ever you are filling up.

18 October 2017

The National Grid have, for some time now, been stating that the demand on the grid for a COMPLETE switch to electric cars will be only 8%.  And yet you think we need an extra 20 power stations.  Hmm, let me see: who is right - you, or the National Grid?  Hmm, tough one.

18 October 2017
It would have been useful if some information on the charging structure had been obtained. I was exploring the zap map last night, the network really is in a sorry state. Poor placements, lower powered chargers on expensive car parks falling into disrepair for months, a mash up of different networks and pricing structures. Ecotricity network lies dormant, Polar charges a sensible 9p per kwh on rapid chargers but nothing on slow ones yet charge a pricey subscription..why not just charge 9p per kwh all round without subscription. A kwh is a kwh if its fast or slow. The growing range of EV's mean most will be able to complete most journeys with charge from home. Slow chargers need to die and be upgraded to rapid only. Think about it, if someone with a long range EV needs a charge they are on a even longer trip so dont want to interupt the travel for hours.. they need a quick top up and go.

18 October 2017

When petrol companines are switching to EV stations then you know EV's are entrenched (full stop)

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

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