A move to the big city highlights an issue with the sat-nav
1 November 2016

It's the little things now. The Hyundai and I bedded in months ago, since when Tucsons have become a regular sight (best colour: Ara Blue).

It’s also been easily long enough for me to tally up the idiosyncrasies. Number one has been the sat-nav, issues with which have become more noticeable since I’ve been using it to guide me from my (new) doorstep rather than having it pilot me to farflung places I won’t ever get to know.

With said doorstep now in south London, my typical journey has changed from 15mph on the M25 to 5mph through Lambeth. And where before the nav proved generally effective in getting me from A to B, heavier traffic can cause it problems – chiefly with the diversions it comes up with to bypass congestion.

Being a bit wet behind the ears, I’ve followed Hyundai’s arrows down some of these London rabbit holes, only to find myself on another similarly busy and, of course, now less direct route. To make matters worse, the nav can be quite optimistic with its ETAs, so I often end the final few miles in a cold sweat. It’s enough of an issue that I’ve chosen to use Google Maps on my phone instead of Hyundai’s system on recent journeys – especially those with an airport at the end of them.

Although the clunkiness of the built-in nav can be irritating, it’s worth noting that Hyundai is hardly alone in the formulation of wonky ‘time-saving’ routes. It’s mostly due to an overriding and in-built preference for main roads over the kind of side-alley shortcuts that any half-decent cabbie would use.

Otherwise, the Tucson has taken to city life rather well. It only took a few days of driving various hatchbacks, each sporting either a small boot or the annoyance of a conspicuous load lip, for me to miss the old girl. Like I said, it’s the little things. 

Luc Lacey

HYUNDAI TUCSON 1.7 CRDI SE NAV

Price £23,145 Price as tested £23,765 Economy 41.8mpg Faults None Expenses None Last seen 7.9.16

Read our previous reports:

Short-haul tests

First report 

1200-mile road trip

Our Verdict

Hyundai Tucson

The Hyundai Tucson is a stylish crossover which focuses mainly on easy-going real-world ability, but is that enough to turn people's heads away from the Nissan Qashqai and Seat Ateca?

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Comments
9

1 November 2016
I'm glad to hear the sat nav keeps this diesel SUV away from smaller roads. Small mercy for the people who live on them.

1 November 2016
scrap wrote:

I'm glad to hear the sat nav keeps this diesel SUV away from smaller roads. Small mercy for the people who live on them.

I would second a suggestion for SUV* satnavs to direct straight into the sea :)

(* Yes of course "working" SUVs are excepted, but then they're likely to be in a field or fixing some pylons on a hill rather than being used for commuting through one of the biggest cities in the world).

1 November 2016
WallMeerkat wrote:
scrap wrote:

I'm glad to hear the sat nav keeps this diesel SUV away from smaller roads. Small mercy for the people who live on them.

I would second a suggestion for SUV* satnavs to direct straight into the sea :)

(* Yes of course "working" SUVs are excepted, but then they're likely to be in a field or fixing some pylons on a hill rather than being used for commuting through one of the biggest cities in the world).

What about ones that occasional go across rutted fields where ground clearance (and sometimes traction) is important?

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

1 November 2016
scrap wrote:

I'm glad to hear the sat nav keeps this diesel SUV away from smaller roads. Small mercy for the people who live on them.

I expect most SUV users who live in towns choose them for their competence at crossing speed humps, the easier entry and exit, the better view in traffic yet modest length and taller tyres so less wheel damage on kerbs. Ironically as I live in Mid Wales I prefer lower cars as they cope with very bendy roads better although if I had the funds an F-Pace or Macan would be on my shopping list.

1 November 2016
Why do we get so many comments about the SAT Nav on a car? What more important the 150 satnav or the £20,000+ car? If the satnav is poor then but a TOMTOM, problem solved.
ANother poor review from Autocar.

1 November 2016
sandy52 wrote:

Why do we get so many comments about the SAT Nav on a car? What more important the 150 satnav or the £20,000+ car? If the satnav is poor then but a TOMTOM, problem solved.
ANother poor review from Autocar.

But then a TOMTOM is a third party box sitting on the windscreen, when this functionality is meant to be integrated into the centre console.

It is the difference between using the built in car stereo and your own top of the range latest hifi on the dashboard.

I actually use the mobile phone these days for nav, the likes of Waze which can sometimes direct round traffic, other times it takes a magical mystery tour for no apparent reason.

1 November 2016
Hardly worth the author turning the PC on for. (Or perhaps they typed it on their phone between Lambeth traffic lights)

1 November 2016
Spend £20k or £30k on a car and the Satnav is almost useless. Spend £300 on a phone and the Satnav is brilliant. It's a valid point to criticise a useless Satnav. Our Land Rover Satnav is also unbelievably bad. Land Rover have said they won't look at it as not many people have complained ! We talk to other Jaguar Land Rover drivers we meet and they all say "We don't use it because it's no good" but they don't complain. How else will these things improve if people don't mention them ?

1 November 2016
There's a popular myth that Goldfish have a memory span of only 3 secs but I reckon not even a Goldfish wouldn't need to use a SatNav on his daily commute to work.

Joking aside, a lorry driver was given a 10 year jail sentence yesterday for killing a mother and her three children - he was looking at his mobile phone rather than the road in front of him. My question is what's the difference between looking at a message on a mobile phone or looking at Google Maps on a mobile phone (as people have suggested above) or for that matter a touchscreen built-in SatNav?

Don't even dare suggest this technology doesn't detract from our responsibility as drivers because it does. And we're all guilty of it.

Have a safe journey.

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