Currently reading: New 2021 Hyundai Tucson priced from £28,495
New family SUV offers a choice of non-electrified, mild-hybrid, full-hybrid and plug-in hybrid powertrains
James Attwood, digital editor
News
4 mins read
11 December 2020

The comprehensively overhauled fourth-generation Hyundai Tucson will go on sale on 7 January and Hyundai has released pricing and specification details for the launch models. 

Four powertrains are available initially, each based around the brand's 1.6-litre Smartstream turbocharged petrol engine: a 148bhp entry-level option with or without 48V mild-hybrid functionality, a more potent 178bhp mild hybrid and a full hybrid with 227bhp. Depending on the engine specified, buyers will have a choice of two six-speed manual gearboxes, a six-speed automatic and a seven-speed dual-clutch automatic unit, with four-wheel drive available on certain variants. 

Hyundai describes each of the three initial trim packages as "high specification". Prices start at £28,495 for entry-level SE Connect trim, which is available with a choice of non-electrified, mild-hybrid and full-hybrid powertrains and comes equipped with 17in alloy wheels, privacy glass, a leather steering wheel, dual-zone air conditioning, a rear-view camera and a "comprehensive" driver aid offering. 

Mid-range Premium trim bumps the price to £30,195 and adds larger wheels, LED headlights, ambient interior lighting and keyless entry. The top-rung Ultimate car - from £32,895 - gets the 178bhp mild-hybrid engine option and a raft of extra interior kit, including heated rear seats, three-zone climate control and a panoramic sunroof. 

A performance-inspired N-Line version has been previewed and is set to touch down early next year, with styling cues lifted from Hyundai's i20 N and i30 N hot hatchbacks, at around the same time as the Tucson gains a new plug-in hybrid option with an electric-only range of more than 31 miles. 

No technical details have been provided for the Tucson N-Line, but it is expected to be available with the higher-end engine options. It's possible that Hyundai will revised the spring and damper rates for a sportier feel, too. 

It's also unclear whether the N-Line model serves as a preview for a range-topping N performance variant coming later on. Hyundai describes N-Line as "an entry level to the N high-performance brand" and a hot Tucson has been rumoured for a few years.

We know that an N version of the smaller Hyundai Kona will arrive next year, but we'll have to wait to see if its larger sibling receives the treatment to go up against the Cupra Ateca

The latest Tucson features a bold new front grille with what Hyundai calls Parametric Hidden Lights built in. Effectively, the LED headlights and “jewel-like” running lights are integrated into the sides of the grille and can’t be distinguished from it when turned off. The grille features 3D parametric graphics, which are used as highlights elsewhere on the car.

Side on, the angular theme continues, while at the back, the window wiper is hidden in the roof-mounted spoiler – a first for Hyundai – with the brand’s logo set into the bottom of the rear windscreen.

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The Hyundai Tucson is a stylish crossover which focuses mainly on easy-going real-world ability, but is that enough to turn people's heads away from the Nissan Qashqai and Seat Ateca?

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At 4500mm long and 1865mm wide, the Tucson is 20mm longer and 15m wider than before, with the 2680mm wheelbase stretched by 10mm. Although two wheelbase versions will be built, only the shorter variant will come to the UK. Buyers can choose from 17in, 18in and 19in wheels and two-tone colour combinations.

Eduardo Ramirez, Hyundai Europe exterior designer, described the new Tucson’s design as “quite brave”. He said: “We’re experimental, always trying to find a very distinctive character in design. Although that doesn’t mean we’ll apply the same formula to every car.”

Ramirez added: “It’s always a big challenge to replace a car that’s been so successful. We’re so proud of Tucson, but we didn’t want to fall into the trap of trying to retain what we had achieved and not go further. We felt free to innovate, which is how ideas like the hidden lights came to life.”

The interior also marks a radical departure from previous Hyundai models, with a minimalist, ‘layered’ design. Hyundai has introduced new ‘Multi-Air Mode Technology’, which combines the direct and indirect air vents to reduce the space they take up and enable a gentler air flow.

The bulk of the physical controls have been removed, with the infotainment and heating controls accessed through a 10.25in vertically mounted touchscreen. There is also a 10.25in digital dashboard, configurable ambient lighting and a wireless smartphone charger.

The infotainment uses the latest version of Hyundai’s Bluelink system, including a range of connected car functions such as Last Mile Navigation, which allows owners to switch route guidance to their smartphone if they park close to their destination.

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Hyundai says it has increased rear leg room. All models feature the same interior dimensions, with the batteries in the hybrid variants mounted under the rear seats.

Hyundai has also added a number of new safety and driver assistance features, including a central airbag and remote parking on the hybrid and PHEV models.

Hyundai has also worked to improve the Tucson’s ride and handling. Vehicle dynamics engineer Julio Varela said the focus was on making it “more comfortable and fun to drive”. It's the first Hyundai outside of the N performance range to be offered with the firm’s Electronic Controlled Suspension, which includes Normal, Eco and Sport driving modes. There are three extra off-road-focused modes on four-wheel-drive variants.

European versions of the new Tucson will be built in the Czech Republic.  

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Bigc218 26 January 2021

I am not sure why people are obsessed with the price to buy outright. 90% of new cars are bought or leased on finance and will only be kept for 3 years. All that is important is the monthly cost. I have just ordered one on 48 month lease for 3 months upfront at £322 per month.

Also, compared to the vw tiguan with the same spec that is over 400 per month 

scotty5 11 December 2020
gavsmit wrote:

small increase over the outgoing model, which starts at £23,150

I bet - NOT!

This will probably start not much off £27k for something with tiny wheels that'll make those square wheel arches look even more ridiculous.

You win your bet although incredibly your estimate was still short. from £28450 !!  That's their most basic trim, with a manual and a classic 1.6 ICE petrol engine with no hybrid pretentions. Add metallic paint as most folk do and we-re talking from £29115. Jeez

The world has gone mad.

Finlay Turnbull 12 December 2020
scotty5 wrote:

gavsmit wrote:

small increase over the outgoing model, which starts at £23,150

I bet - NOT!

This will probably start not much off £27k for something with tiny wheels that'll make those square wheel arches look even more ridiculous.

You win your bet although incredibly your estimate was still short. from £28450 !!  That's their most basic trim, with a manual and a classic 1.6 ICE petrol engine with no hybrid pretentions. Add metallic paint as most folk do and we-re talking from £29115. Jeez

The world has gone mad.

 

Agreed! Interestingly the Puma ST and base-spec 2021 Tucson SE Connect both have the same starting price of £28,495. I know which one I'd rather have!

Finlay Turnbull 11 December 2020

I'd much rather have an XC40 for the same cash!  

The new Tucson is expensive! The entry level trimline is over £1000 more than the Mazda CX-5 SE-L, over £1500 more than a Tiguan Life, over £1500 more than a Kuga Zetec, over £3,000 more than the cheapest XC40, over £4800 more than the entry-level Ateca, and over £5,000 more than the entry-level Kia Sportage and Skoda Karoq.  

Hyundai has experienced a year-on-year sales decline of 44.46% in a market down 30.7%. The new Tucson will not turn the company's fortunes around. It's just going to make things worse. 

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