Tweaked 1.6 i-DTEC diesel engine joins the new Civic range from February 2018

Honda has confirmed pricing for its Civic diesel model, which joins the range this February as the second engine option for the regular car.

Priced from £20,120, the diesel starts at £1230 higher than the entry-level turbocharged 1.0-litre three-cylinder unit and is slightly costlier than its archrival, the entry-level Ford Focus diesel, which starts at £20,195.

The Civic diesel also adds a new trim to the UK range. Beneath the SE and SR trims currently offered with the petrol, the 1.6-litre i-DTEC diesel is available in an entry-level S trim.

The 1.6-litre engine is an upgraded version of the previous Civic's diesel unit. It features higher-strength pistons and low-friction cylinder bores, although the car’s power and torque remain the same at 118bhp and 221b ft. The differences add up to a fuel economy – under the new WLTP testing procedure – of 76.3mpg, with CO2 output of 99g/km.

Honda now makes the pistons of the engine from a chromium-molybdenum steel alloy, while the bores have been subject to ‘super plateau honing’, which smooths the movement of the pistons. 

In addition, Honda claims that the engine will be more refined and quieter than before, thanks to greater rigidity through the use of more cast ribs on the cylinder block. 

To improve NOx emissions, the unit has an improved storage converter, which stores harmful gas until the regeneration cycle is under way, while a soot sensor improves the longevity of exhaust parts such as the particulate filter. 

Later in the year, the new Civic will be available with a turbocharged 1.5-litre four-cylinder petrol engine producing 180bhp, as well as Honda’s nine-speed automatic gearbox. It’s the first time Honda has put the transmission in a two-wheel-drive car, following its introduction to the CR-V in 2015.

The new Civic range also includes the Type R model, which uses a turbocharged 2.0-litre engine producing 316bhp.

Read more:

2017 Honda Civic on sale in March priced from £18,235

Honda Civic Type R GT UK 2017 review

Honda Civic vs Peugeot 308 vs Volkswagen Golf: group test

Our Verdict

Honda Civic

Honda’s 10th-generation Civic hatchback goes global — but is that good news?

Join the debate

Comments
8

16 August 2017

Interesting that Honda is quoting figures from the new test proceedure, not sure if manufacturers are yet required to do so? That said, the figures don't seem greatly different from those from the present EU test, so either this car is exceedingly economical, or we're still going to be getting complaints from owners that the test is too lenient and not representative of "real world". 

Also I can't help feeling that Honda is out of step with the European market, since its IMA petrol electric models when diesels were the norm - and latterly seems to be pedalling its i-DTEC diesels, just when the rest of the industry is waking up to hybrids. Surprisingly there is no longer a Civic IMA model, even in America. 

 

16 August 2017

The 1.6 i-DTEC in the previous Civic was very frugal so, after a few tweaks, I don't think the quoted economy figures for the new car will be massively wide of the mark. Have to agree with you on the IMA comments though, Honda were ahead of the game and if they had continued to push hybrids like Toyota, they could have been in a stronger position. An IMA equipped version of their 1.0l turbo could work very nicely.

16 August 2017

I also never understood Honda's ima withdrawal, they were ahead of the competition with it and now seem to be behind, although New hybrids are coming.

12 September 2017

Now March, that's nearly a year without a Diesel model. Wonder if Honda thought about pulling Diesel from this model altogether

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

26 October 2017
xxxx wrote:

Now March, that's nearly a year without a Diesel model. Wonder if Honda thought about pulling Diesel from this model altogether

As the majority of Honda Civic sales 2006 till the current model were diesel I would find it very difficult to believe not offering a diesel version would have been considered.

Under the current "scrappage" schemes on offer it has been reported the most common car to be taken under the deals is the Golf and that across all makes under the scrappage scheme 49% of cars were petrol powered. I could not find any info as to what the "scrapped" cars were replaced with though.p

maxecat

15 January 2018
Maxecat wrote:

xxxx wrote:

Now March, that's nearly a year without a Diesel model. Wonder if Honda thought about pulling Diesel from this model altogether

As the majority of Honda Civic sales 2006 till the current model were diesel I would find it very difficult to believe not offering a diesel version would have been considered.

Not sure where you got your worldwide Civic sales split but that model had the crappy 1.4 and 1.8 NA engines i.e. no modern low tax 1.0 Turbo

Either way we'll never know whether Honda considered dumping it but they sure took their time releasing it!

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

16 January 2018
xxxx wrote:

Not sure where you got your worldwide Civic sales split but that model had the crappy 1.4 and 1.8 NA engines i.e. no modern low tax 1.0 Turbo

 

I really struggle to see your obsession with Downsized turbos being better! They just are not in all reality! I've experienced it personally with the Fiat/Chrysler 1.4 multiair Turbo 170 engine (which was useless and drank alot!) and even autocar are commenting on it in their long term review of the new civic 1.0 125 Turbo.

 

"Just one foible stops it from being a decent cruiser: fuel economy. An average return of 36mpg over 400 miles of motorway is not enough to justify downsizing to this car’s 1.0-litre triple."

https://www.autocar.co.uk/car-review/honda/civic/first-drives/honda-civic-long-term-review

I get 35mpg from my 2.0 i-VTEC NA 197bhp Type-R! And that's on a 30 mile run on motorways AND B-roads! When I was doing 35 miles each way on just the motorway, I was getting 41mpg! My average over the last 12 months has been 38mpg, in a powerful old dinosaur of a car with far more performance potential than the 1.0 3 pot, which is more than the downsized car is managing.

21 January 2018

If the Honda Civic is £20,120 and the Ford Focus £20,195, how can the Honda be costlier ?

Add your comment

Log in or register to post comments

Find an Autocar car review

Driven this week

  • Honda Civic Type R
    First Drive
    19 February 2018
    It’s a warm welcome to this steaming hot hatch. But is it too fiery for Britain’s roads?
  • Aston Martin DB11 Volante
    The DB11 Volante chassis' torsional rigidity is 22kN/deg, down from 34kN/deg on the coupe – but substantially more than the 14.7kN/deg of the DB9 Volante
    First Drive
    19 February 2018
    The DB11 Volante is the first convertible variant of Aston Martin's new model generation. How does it compare to the likes of the new Ferrari Portofino?
  • BMW 6 Series Gran Turismo front
    The new BMW 6 Series Gran Turismo
    First Drive
    16 February 2018
    The top-of-the-line 6 Series Gran Turismo has arrived in the UK, but does a more potent engine increase its unusual appeal?
  • Audi TT RS Coupé
    First Drive
    16 February 2018
    The Audi TT RS has the looks, a vociferous engine and the supercar-baiting performance, but is it too uncompromising to use as a daily driver?
  • Range Rover Velar front quarter
    The new Range Rover Velar P300 features a four-cylinder petrol engine
    First Drive
    16 February 2018
    JLR’s most powerful four-pot isn’t the engine the Velar truly wants but perhaps the one that makes most sense