Nope, us neither. An 82-year-old in Cumbria has, though.
30 October 2007

A woman in Cumbria may face a charge for dangerous driving after travelling four miles in the wrong direction on the M6. The 82-year-old was driving between Carlisle and Windermere, but took a wrong turn and entered the northbound M6 carriageway whilst travelling south. Drivers swerved to avoid the silver Peugeot, which was doing between 60mph and 70 mph into traffic travelling the opposite direction in the fast lane. One driver was lucky to avoid serious injury after crashing into the central reservation to avoid a head-on collision. The woman stopped as soon as she saw the police car's flashing blue lights – but obviously thought nothing of the cars that span, and occasionally crashed to avoid her.

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9

30 October 2007

How difficult would it be to put big signs up on the reverse side of the exit saying "Wrong Way - Stop Now!", or something of this nature?

I've met a vehicle once travelling on the wrong side and the driver seemed oblivious to all the light flashing and horn blowing. You'd think you would notice fairly quickly. I don't know how it happens, but obviously it's easier to do than it should be.

30 October 2007

Assume nothing, and you wont be suprised. Though this is a pretty severe case of stupidity. If we really had to resort to signs, or one-way tyre spikes, then its a sad day for the country.

30 October 2007

I once met a car coming the wrong way on the A50 link on the Derby side of Utoxeter. Scared the hell out of me because i used to do this route every Sunday night at a steady quite quick and spent much of that time in the outside lane where the offending individual was.

I suppose if its your time then its you time and if its not then keep on driving.

31 October 2007

I've never driven the wrong way on any dual carriageway but many years ago (late seventies, I guess) a Cortina came the wrong way along the M55 as I drove towards Preston. Fortunately, I was in the overtaking lane but was able to pull into the middle lane to avoid it.

31 October 2007

It seem utterly ridiculous to me that they are merely considering charging her for dangerous driving and not giving her an instant ban. There was clearly no malicious intent involved - she was probably just really confused - but if you can drive for four miles the wrong way up a motorway and not notice, you shouldn't be on the road - whether it's stupidity, confusion, poor sight/senses, panic, whatever.

Maybe I'm missing the point here, but it seems to me that somebody driving the wrong way on a carriageway is more dangerous than somebody doing over 100mph (which equates to an instant ban). Where's the point in traffic law if it doesn't remove drivers so clearly incapable of understanding the roads?

31 October 2007

[quote Vicky Parrott 4]Where's the point in traffic law if it doesn't remove drivers so clearly incapable of understanding the roads?[/quote]

Indeed. Should be a ban for a at least 3 years, and id even consider jail time or something. If she had hit a car with kids in it this would be all over the papers.

31 October 2007

I have to agree entirely with Vicky's comments. What a great advertisement for the benefits of re-evaluating driving skills on a regular basis. I cannot see how anyone who is in control of their mental and physical faculties could be so utterly oblivious to what is going on, and it is precisely that extreme lack of awareness - regardless of the root causes - that not only justifes, but demands, the kind of response that will protect innocent road users from this person's incompetence.

When I picture the scale of carnage that might have ensued it makes my blood run cold. Worse than that, however, can you imagine how disastrous it would be for this person to be allowed back behind the wheel only to do something daft again, but this time with fatal consequences?

That the system so frequently lacks balance in the relationship between the offence and the punishment meted out only adds insult to injury.

10 November 2007

[quote Vicky Parrott.]

It seem utterly ridiculous to me that they are merely considering charging her for dangerous driving and not giving her an instant ban. There was clearly no malicious intent involved - she was probably just really confused - but if you can drive for four miles the wrong way up a motorway and not notice, you shouldn't be on the road - whether it's stupidity, confusion, poor sight/senses, panic, whatever.

[/quote]

Couldn't agree more. Take her off the road.

21 May 2014
My son was recently asked what the FIRST action should be if he found that he was driving the wrong direction on a motorway.

I wonder if anyone can confirm what the correct answer is?

There seem to be several plausible obvious alternatives but I have been unable to find the legally correct one so far.

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