From £19,9958
The Mondeo ST-Line marries sporty styling with that car's signature dynamism to make a rather appealing package designed for private buyers

Our Verdict

Ford Mondeo

Ford's family car is now in its fourth iteration, but is the Mondeo ready to take the fight to a world burgeoning with rivals?

13 December 2017

What is it?

When the Ford Mondeo Mk1 first appeared in 1993, its agile handling and responsive steering turned what was expected to be a run-of-the-mill fleet car into a driver’s delight. It’s grown a bit since then – by around 400mm in length and to more than 250kg – but it’s also grown into a more refined proposition.

The Mondeo ST-Line and more expensive ST-Line X introduced in 2017 were part of Ford’s strategy to split ranges above the entry level into sports and luxury trim levels (Titanium and Vignale). Thus, both versions of ST-Line are sporting trims akin to Audi’s S line rather than a return to true sports ‘ST’ versions of the Mondeo. For the 2018 model year, ST-Line X has been renamed ST-Line Edition. ST-Line is not aimed at fleets but fair and square at the retail buyer.

The Mondeo ST-Line comes with sports suspension that is slightly stiffer and 10mm lower than standard. Outside, there’s a full body styling kit and 18in Rock Metallic alloy wheels. Inside, there are front cloth sports seats with red contrast stitching, alloy pedals, accented red stitching on the steering wheel, centre console and door trims, and dark headliner.

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ST-Line Edition gets Titanium equipment such as traffic sign recognition, lane keeping aid and 10-way electrically adjustable driver's seat (passenger seat remains manual), and adds further enhancements including rear privacy glass, ST-Line branding, coloured stitching and sports trim items. It, too, gets the sport suspension but 19in Rock Metallic alloy wheels. Seats are trimmed in partial leather that is black with red stitching.

Powertrains are either 148bhp or 178bhp 2.0 Duratorq TDCi diesel, with either six-speed manual transmission or PowerShift dual-clutch automatic on the more powerful engine. There’s also an all-wheel-drive option tested here, in conjunction with the 178bhp diesel and auto 'box.

What's it like?

The car we tested had a few variations from standard spec – the main difference being that it was rolling on 19in ST-Line Edition wheels clad with 235/40 R19 Continental ContiSportContact tyres. The steering has that sharp response to initial steering input that Ford is known for and immediately weights up nicely either side of the straight ahead. On a mix of urban and motorway driving, the ride remains surprisingly supple on the bigger wheels and has firmer suspension compared with a standard Vignale model we tried back to back. Wind and road noise at the legal limit on the motorway are comfortably low.

The 178bhp diesel in combination with the PowerShift auto 'box is smooth and slick, if not quite as quiet and refined as the same combination in the Vignale. The PowerShift gearbox shifts imperceptibly and responds quickly to kickdown. Most of the time, though, it will hold a gear and draw on the diesel’s substantial reserves of torque.

Comfortable sports seats (electric for the driver and manual for front passenger) with contemporary, two-tone textured fabrics live up to their sports moniker, providing a noticeably lower seating position than in the Vignale. Once installed, the view ahead and around the interior is slightly disappointing, though. The dash has a nicely finished soft surface but the centre console is plain, with grey against grey and little in the way of highlights. Some satin-finish metal trim inserts would add a bit of pizzazz and make a huge difference. 

Should I buy one?

Price cuts have been made across the Mondeo range to help customers with taxation and, for 2018, a hefty £3,200 has been trimmed from the price of the ST-Line. Ford says that because of the ST-Line’s better residuals, customers opting to buy on PCP should be able to get an ST-Line for a lower monthly payment than an entry-level Zetec

For 2018, Ford has added Active City Stop (autonomous emergency braking), front and rear parking sensors and satellite navigation across the Mondeo range. The addition of Active City Stop is money saver as well as a safety aid, because Ford reckons it knocks two to three bands off the insurance premium. What all this adds up to is a lot of car for the money based on ability and equipment levels in a the hotly contested segment.

Ford Mondeo ST-Line 2.0 TDCi 180PS

Where Greater London On sale Now Price £26,595 Engine 4cyls, 1998cc, turbocharged diesel Power 178bhp at 3500rpm Torque 295lb ft at 2000rpm Gearbox 6-spd dual-clutch automatic Kerb weight 1,683kg Top speed 140mph 0-62mph 9.3sec Fuel economy 53.3mpg (combined) CO2/tax band 138g/km, 29% Rivals Volkswagen Passat R-Line 2.0 TDI, Vauxhall Insignia Grand Sport VX-Line Nav, Audi A4 Saloon S line

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Comments
22

13 December 2017

Having recently hired one of these I am quite impressed.

Maybe when I deceide to trade in my Octavia VRS I will give one of these a closer examination... so long as my local Ford dealer can be bothered to show the teeniest bit of interest when I walk into their showroom.

Steam cars are due a revival.

13 December 2017

Its a big old Bus of a thing now, I had an 01’ on a Y plate and is was great,huge boot, roomy back seat for three kids and it handled to boot, this current looks like a Limo, long and wide, I notice they don’t fit Parking spaces (to long, to wide), so ,no, not for me thanks.

Peter Cavellini.

13 December 2017

At one time a refresh of a mainstream big hatch/saloon would have been met with a yawn from this direction.

Now, after all those bloody faux 4x4 bricks it truly looks refreshing on my eyes.

We'll miss them when they're gone, you know.

If I want an autonomous car, I'll take a taxi.

14 December 2017
Zeddy wrote:

At one time a refresh of a mainstream big hatch/saloon would have been met with a yawn from this direction.

Now, after all those bloody faux 4x4 bricks it truly looks refreshing on my eyes.

We'll miss them when they're gone, you know.

 

Here here! In a world of fat-a**ed SUVs the Mondeo is a breath of fresh air.

Wish there was a rear wiper delete option, or at least a subtle flush horizontal item like the Octavia has. The rear wiper on this looks like something from a 1980s coach.

"We'll miss them when they're gone, you know."

They're going, we're missing the Accord, Laguna/Talisman, C5, Primera etc. play a game of Toca from the 90s and half the cars you cannot buy a modern equivalent :(

Not to mention the mainstream E segment that died a while back while nobody noticed (Legend, Scorpio, Omega, Maxima, Camry, Safrane, C6 etc.) seemingly only survived by the fleet friendly Superb.

 

13 December 2017

I own a one of these 2.0tdci 180 Powershift Titanium X pack with 19” alloys - I have to say it is a brilliant car, very good to drive and pleased with it.

 

@Marc - you must spitting feathers reading this review.... 

13 December 2017
Jimbbobw1977 wrote:

I own a one of these 2.0tdci 180 Powershift Titanium X pack with 19” alloys - I have to say it is a brilliant car, very good to drive and pleased with it.

 

@Marc - you must spitting feathers reading this review.... 

Nope. The Mondeo, this version at least is a relative beacon of hope in the murky puddle of shit that is Ford. Some questionable fit, finish and quality issues aside it's not too bad. Although the true reason for a reduction in the list is down to the Opel's sticker price, and nothing else. Problem is for Opel/Vauxhall that price is unsustainable but it's forced Ford of Europe's hand. The downward spiral of the middle ground continues. If only Ford understood branding.

13 December 2017
Marc wrote:
Jimbbobw1977 wrote:

I own a one of these 2.0tdci 180 Powershift Titanium X pack with 19” alloys - I have to say it is a brilliant car, very good to drive and pleased with it.

 

@Marc - you must spitting feathers reading this review.... 

Nope. The Mondeo, this version at least is a relative beacon of hope in the murky puddle of shit that is Ford. Some questionable fit, finish and quality issues aside it's not too bad. Although the true reason for a reduction in the list is down to the Opel's sticker price, and nothing else. Problem is for Opel/Vauxhall that price is unsustainable but it's forced Ford of Europe's hand. The downward spiral of the middle ground continues. If only Ford understood branding.

No questionable fit and finish on mine nor any rattles on mine neither, and as I’ve said before for the price I paid for it and the tech, kit, spec and performance of it I can not complain when as an alternative I could have a crummy spec low powered A3 for the same price, at least I don’t have to put up with archaic torsion beam rear suspension, rattles and cheap cabin touch parts such as the bonnet release.. 

13 December 2017
Jimbbobw1977 wrote:

Marc wrote:
Jimbbobw1977 wrote:

I own a one of these 2.0tdci 180 Powershift Titanium X pack with 19” alloys - I have to say it is a brilliant car, very good to drive and pleased with it.

 

@Marc - you must spitting feathers reading this review.... 

Nope. The Mondeo, this version at least is a relative beacon of hope in the murky puddle of shit that is Ford. Some questionable fit, finish and quality issues aside it's not too bad. Although the true reason for a reduction in the list is down to the Opel's sticker price, and nothing else. Problem is for Opel/Vauxhall that price is unsustainable but it's forced Ford of Europe's hand. The downward spiral of the middle ground continues. If only Ford understood branding.

No questionable fit and finish on mine nor any rattles on mine neither, and as I’ve said before for the price I paid for it and the tech, kit, spec and performance of it I can not complain when as an alternative I could have a crummy spec low powered A3 for the same price, at least I don’t have to put up with archaic torsion beam rear suspension, rattles and cheap cabin touch parts such as the bonnet release.. 

You could have whatever, the list, argument could go on forever. Give me 5 minutes with your Mondeo and I'll show you at least 10 quality and build issues that you wouldn't find on any MQB VAG product. I'll tell what the fault is, why it's there and how to fix it. That's difference between Ford and VAG, one listens and invests. The other ploughs on. One is the owner of some of the most profitable brands in the automotive sector. The other is profitless.

13 December 2017
Marc wrote:
Jimbbobw1977 wrote:

Marc wrote:
Jimbbobw1977 wrote:

I own a one of these 2.0tdci 180 Powershift Titanium X pack with 19” alloys - I have to say it is a brilliant car, very good to drive and pleased with it.

 

@Marc - you must spitting feathers reading this review.... 

Nope. The Mondeo, this version at least is a relative beacon of hope in the murky puddle of shit that is Ford. Some questionable fit, finish and quality issues aside it's not too bad. Although the true reason for a reduction in the list is down to the Opel's sticker price, and nothing else. Problem is for Opel/Vauxhall that price is unsustainable but it's forced Ford of Europe's hand. The downward spiral of the middle ground continues. If only Ford understood branding.

No questionable fit and finish on mine nor any rattles on mine neither, and as I’ve said before for the price I paid for it and the tech, kit, spec and performance of it I can not complain when as an alternative I could have a crummy spec low powered A3 for the same price, at least I don’t have to put up with archaic torsion beam rear suspension, rattles and cheap cabin touch parts such as the bonnet release.. 

You could have whatever, the list, argument could go on forever. Give me 5 minutes with your Mondeo and I'll show you at least 10 quality and build issues that you wouldn't find on any MQB VAG product. I'll tell what the fault is, why it's there and how to fix it. That's difference between Ford and VAG, one listens and invests. The other ploughs on. One is the owner of some of the most profitable brands in the automotive sector. The other is profitless.

I have no affiliation to one particular brand, what I do want however is value for money/kit/performance. As you well know I also have a VAG car an Audi A3 8P. I am also aware that this car has been somewhat problematic at times. I am also a member of Audi forums and also Ford forums and read real customer reviews.

So.. I would like you to explain to me how, if the quality is one to be desired on a VAG product why do they feature so far below most mainstream manufactures in reliability Audi more so than most in the VAG product range? (Skoda demographics and limited mileage taint this outcome) 

I would also like you to explain these ‘extra’ qualities a VAG car posses, bearing in mind VAG is a mass market manufacturer to make a profit (as seen in the ongoing saga of its emissions scandal now also involving Euro6 cars) 

And I am talking here in general here compared to other manufacturers.

My experience of VAG products to drive is they are fine, however are they with the hype? Nope not at all and reliability tables also tell me otherwise.

13 December 2017
Jimbbobw1977 wrote:

Marc wrote:
Jimbbobw1977 wrote:

Marc wrote:
Jimbbobw1977 wrote:

I own a one of these 2.0tdci 180 Powershift Titanium X pack with 19” alloys - I have to say it is a brilliant car, very good to drive and pleased with it.

 

@Marc - you must spitting feathers reading this review.... 

Nope. The Mondeo, this version at least is a relative beacon of hope in the murky puddle of shit that is Ford. Some questionable fit, finish and quality issues aside it's not too bad. Although the true reason for a reduction in the list is down to the Opel's sticker price, and nothing else. Problem is for Opel/Vauxhall that price is unsustainable but it's forced Ford of Europe's hand. The downward spiral of the middle ground continues. If only Ford understood branding.

No questionable fit and finish on mine nor any rattles on mine neither, and as I’ve said before for the price I paid for it and the tech, kit, spec and performance of it I can not complain when as an alternative I could have a crummy spec low powered A3 for the same price, at least I don’t have to put up with archaic torsion beam rear suspension, rattles and cheap cabin touch parts such as the bonnet release.. 

You could have whatever, the list, argument could go on forever. Give me 5 minutes with your Mondeo and I'll show you at least 10 quality and build issues that you wouldn't find on any MQB VAG product. I'll tell what the fault is, why it's there and how to fix it. That's difference between Ford and VAG, one listens and invests. The other ploughs on. One is the owner of some of the most profitable brands in the automotive sector. The other is profitless.

I have no affiliation to one particular brand, what I do want however is value for money/kit/performance. As you well know I also have a VAG car an Audi A3 8P. I am also aware that this car has been somewhat problematic at times. I am also a member of Audi forums and also Ford forums and read real customer reviews.

So.. I would like you to explain to me how, if the quality is one to be desired on a VAG product why do they feature so far below most mainstream manufactures in reliability Audi more so than most in the VAG product range? (Skoda demographics and limited mileage taint this outcome) 

I would also like you to explain these ‘extra’ qualities a VAG car posses, bearing in mind VAG is a mass market manufacturer to make a profit (as seen in the ongoing saga of its emissions scandal now also involving Euro6 cars) 

And I am talking here in general here compared to other manufacturers.

My experience of VAG products to drive is they are fine, however are they with the hype? Nope not at all and reliability tables also tell me otherwise.

I never mentioned reliability, and never have. Emission scandals have nothing to do with this either. Whether the quality of a product is to be desired over that of another is ones own decision. I'm referring to manufacturing quality and tolerances and how they're implemented and controlled. Ford have very different values in comparison to VAG. They're not a pleasant company to work for, it's also quite alarming in how the customer is viewed internally, as well as suppliers of all tiers. Culturally alarming. I was once at a meeting attended by quite senior Ford Managers from various departments. They had been asked to bring with them presentations on how they viewed the company along with recommendations on how to 'push' forward the 'big brand'. Most came with the usual brown nosing shite. But I vividly remember one, he said he saw Ford as a global monster that no longer new why it even existed but neither did it know how to die. He then put forward some very good product consolidation plans an so on... He was placed on garden leave within a week and gone within a month. Down with the visionary's. The great comedy act rolls on.

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