Latest photos reveal mix of analogue and digital instruments in cabin; next 911 will be first available with hybrid powertrain
Darren Moss
2 October 2017

The 2019 Porsche 911 will inherit the part-digital and part-analogue instrument cluster of the latest Cayenne and Panamera, as shown by new spy pictures of a development car's dashboard.

Caught testing in the US, the model, which is due to be revealed in late 2018 before going on sale in the following year, will retain the central rev counter of its forebears. But for the first time in a 911, it'll be flanked by two digital screens, located in a cluster that curves around the centre console touchscreen.

The technology mimics the wraparound design of Volkswagen Group stablemate Audi and its Virtual Cockpit, but keeps a more traditional layout with revs the the main focus.

Porsche's future 911 will also be the first to come with hybrid power. Speaking to Autocar last year, Porsche engineers confirmed they were working on how to package a hybrid powertrain in the 911's body - something that could also account for the wider stance of development cars.

Porsche 911 product line director Erhard Mössle, now retired, said at the time: "We have to meet the CO2 regulations in 2020. The technology available is not far away from meeting our goals for such a car in terms of range and charging speed.” 

Since then, Porsche has also confirmed the arrival of a Mission E all-electric model by the end of the decade.

The car maker already has hybrid powertrains in its Cayenne SUV and Panamera saloon, with both cars using the same supercharged 3.0-litre petrol engine in combination with an electric motor. The 918 Spyder also features a hybrid powertrain, which mates a 4.6-litre V8 engine with two electric motors.

As well as the option of a hybrid model, Porsche is considering an all-electric version of the 911 in the same vein as the Audi R8 e-tron.

However, this model is not seen as a guaranteed production car. Mössle said Porsche would need to “look at what is the right time and whether there is the need for it. It’s expensive and you never know if you will get your money back.”

Base models of the 911 are expected to use the same twin-turbo 3.0-litre flat-six engine that made its debut in the facelifted 911 Carrera.

Mössle also confirmed the new 911 will sit on a modified version of the MMB platform used by today's car and feature only mild styling changes: "The 911 is always an evolution, not a revolution. It will always be step by step.”

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Comments
27

23 November 2015
With the increase of traffic? Why not use that famous German ingenuity to make the 911 smaller? Active suspension can be of great help to keep body roll whilst cornering in check.

23 November 2015
Hmm... Porsche needs a Model S competitor. Gosh, if only they had a four-passenger, fully electric larger saloon on the shelf...

Not sure what would lead someone to write a story about Porsche and electrification and not mention the Mission E, but it sounds like some basic lessons on editorial control and/or basic research are called for here...

23 November 2015
Don't care what anyone says,if my numbers came up,i'd have no hesitation putting a deposit down the very next Day.

Peter Cavellini.

23 November 2015
It's stunning. If my numbers came up I'd be straight to Porsche Nottingham to order one... And a Cayman... And a 911 Targa... Maybe a Macan for my wife... And a Boxster for my daughter (to sit in with her friends and pretend they are going in holiday (she's only 11))...

23 November 2015
From the little information provided in this article and elsewhere, it seems the next-gen 911's main claim to fame will be electrics: all digital dash, hybrid powertrain, 48 volt electrical system and most likely electrically controlled turbos...a 911 for the Playstation/smartphone generation then. Not all that exciting from an engineering point of view...but what can you do, the future's coming and its zero emissions. Cars can still be great, its just that they won't sound so good anymore...mmmmmm like that!

Cyborg

23 November 2015
Not at all exciting as the Carrera Turbo, the boxer 4 Cayman, etc.
Sad future...

23 November 2015
make the 911 wider, so that it's totally unusable on public roads. Wider than Ferrari or Range. Rover.

23 November 2015
Who on Earth could support the hybridisation of sportscars? More weight, less power, worse handling and most cost. All for a few MPG and CO2, both of which are irrelevant. This is against everything the 911 stands for and God help us if it goes the way of the i8, which may be an intriguing machine but is ultimately a PR stunt. I can understand BMW wanting to be seen to be doing the "right thing" but part of Porsche's appeal was that it never used to bother with any of that crap.

24 November 2015
Norma Smellons wrote:

Who on Earth could support the hybridisation of sportscars? More weight, less power, worse handling

Quite agree, I recall the almost universal condemnation of the McLaren P1, LaFerrari and Porsche 918. Overweight, underpowered barges the lot of them... or perhaps not.

24 November 2015
Impressive as they are, those hypercars are PR stunts, too. They illustrate the problems inherent in adding another drivetrain to a sportscar - complexity, weight and above all, cost.

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