Currently reading: Next-gen Peugeot 308 to get 300bhp-plus performance version
VW Golf R rival will accompany the launch of the 2022 308 hatchback range, and sport four-wheel drive and plug-in hybrid tech
Mark Tisshaw
News
4 mins read
4 May 2020

The next generation of Peugeot models will kick off with the all-new 308 in 2022 – and the range is set to include a hybrid hot hatch under the brand’s new PSE performance arm.

When it was launched in 2014, the current 308 kick-started the transformation of the entire Peugeot range with a more confident design approach. The successful, more daringly styled 3008 followed, along with the 5008, 208 and 2008.

The next 308 is set to play that role again by laying the groundwork for a new era of Peugeots when it goes on sale in just under two years’ time, most likely after a public debut towards the end of 2021.

It will be built on an updated version of the EMP2 platform that underpins more than a dozen PSA Group models and was originally introduced on today’s 308. 

PSA’s strategy so far has been for EMP2 models to be offered with plug-in hybrid technology and for smaller CMP models to come with dedicated electric versions, both offered alongside existing petrol and diesel variants.

The 308 is set to get a plug-in hybrid drivetrain, mixing a 1.6-litre petrol engine with an electric motor to drive the front wheels in a mainstream variant. However, it’s a proposed second plug-in hybrid model that will interest enthusiasts.

This model would gain an additional electric motor on the rear axle – a set-up already used on the 3008 PHEV – to give the 308 four-wheel drive and create a new 300bhp-plus hot hatch version that would also receive a host of sporty chassis and styling upgrades to challenge the likes of the Volkswagen Golf R.

This 308 hot hatch would come under the firm’s new Peugeot Sport Engineered (PSE) sub-brand, whose badge is set to appear first on a range-topping performance version of the 508 in the autumn. Should the 508 PSE be a success, Peugeot boss Jean-Philippe Imparato told Autocar the PSE formula could be applied “on the 3008 and other cars”, a comment that alludes to the desire to extend it to the 308.

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Success will not be judged on sales, either, but instead on the reputation and acclaim the PSE models receive. To that end, the PSE project is as much about “transforming electric cars” and the perception of them, because Imparato sees “a big opportunity for a line-up of sporty cars” in this mould.

The GTi badge will not be used on the 308 or any other Peugeots apart from the 208. Even then, it might be limited to the UK only and be based on the fully electric version as part of the company’s plans to switch Peugeot Sport’s involvement in its models to electrified powertrains only.

The next 308 range will again include five-door hatchback and estate versions, with still no return for the likes of the 308 CC coupé-convertible seen in previous generations, due to the lack of profitability with such cars. “I love these cars but today there are three other topics first,” said Imparato, naming 5G connectivity and autonomous vehicle development alongside electrified models.

However, a crossover version of the 308 is a strong possibility for Peugeot. It has noted the success of the Mercedes-Benz GLA, effectively a raised version of the A-Class hatchback. In addition, fellow PSA brand DS is planning both hatchback and crossover versions of its own new A-Class/GLA rival, which is due later this year with a shared body-in-white. There’s enough of a gap between the 308 and larger 3008 SUV to make such a car a reality.

Updated petrol and diesel engines will continue to be offered alongside the plug-in hybrids. Peugeot is still committed to diesel and is even offering it in its new 208 supermini and 2008 crossover models at a time when many rivals are abandoning the fuel at this end of the market.

An electric version of the 308 may be on the cards too, as Imparato hinted late last year in an interview with Automotive News Europe: “It [the 308] will be a plug-in hybrid first but could perhaps later have a full-electric drivetrain. Our compact and mid-size cars will have plug-in hybrid drivetrains, because it’s a smoother way to switch from internal combustion to electric.”

Styling-wise, the 308 is set to build on the bold look of all other recent Peugeots. “We put the design first,” said Imparato when describing why Peugeot’s comeback has been so successful. “On top of all the investment choices, I protected the design. Then the brand image recovers.”

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Inside, the style-led formula will continue with an updated version of Peugeot’s i-Cockpit design, adapted from that of the newer 3008 and 508.

Peugeot will be hoping for much greater sales success for the 308 in the UK, though, where it has struggled. “This car was Car of the Year in 2014 and has been a huge sales success in Europe,” said Imparato. “It’s not as strong in the UK, where it deserves more than a 2.5% market share.”

READ MORE

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Peugeot GTi sub-brand will live on, hot 208 likely 

New Peugeot 508 PSE to make production-ready debut 

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Comments
11

4 May 2020

I don't understand this. Peugeot has real heritage with the GTI badge, almost as much as VW. There was even a 505 GTI back in the day, which was obviously not a hot hatch, but as a range topping saloon made sense. PSE is just meaningless.

4 May 2020

 The GTi moniker stuck on the back of any car signified you'd bought something a little bit special, but, I think it doesn't mean so much today, Seat persist with FR , PSE...?, sounds like something a Doctor would call a disease. as for the car itself, it's generic, it has the same rough shape as all Hot hatch have, the interior will get a little titivation, and 300bhp even to day is a bit limp, and of course there's the "how much!" I hope it's the low thirties......

 

 

 

4 May 2020
You are right, they do have a heritage with the GTI brand but I think that's the reason they won't be using it this time - they don't want to dilute it.
This hybrid, 300bhp it might be but it won't be a GTI, and then reviewers (including this magazine) with drop a "star" for not being "a proper GTI" (in addition to the star they drop by default for being French).
They will most likely save the GTI moniker for a future full electric version, maybe the model after this one, if a new battery technology is commercially viable by then.

4 May 2020

Wouldnt it be nice to read the Peugeot were going to give us a hot hatch with the feel, and ride and handling balance of the 309GTi or the 306GTi6. Do we really care if its got 300BHP if its heavy, and 4wd? 

I really couldnt care what badge they stick on it. Make it drive like a Peugeot from the 90s and call it what ever you want

4 May 2020
artill wrote:

I really couldnt care what badge they stick on it. Make it drive like a Peugeot from the 90s and call it what ever you want

And also offer it in 3-door version.

4 May 2020
I think Peugeot have given us something akin to a modern day 309 GTI and that's the 308 GTI currently on sale today, and which most people haven't even heard of:

1250kg

272 bhp from a 1.6T with forged internals, Mahle pistons etc

Totsen LSD

4 Pot Alcon brakes with 380mm discs

Wider track

19 Alloys with MPSS tyres.

It has been on sale for 4 years and it's a cracking car with serious pace and an excellent ride/handling balance due to a slightly softer suspension set-up. Unfortunately they just don't sell here in the UK as it seems the majority of UK drives will now only buy German and without even considering what else is out there, which is such a shame. Fortunately some of us aren't obsessed with the country of manufacture or a plastic badge.

Respect to Peugeot for giving us the 308 GTI but it's such a shame that low sales of what is a truly excellent hot hatch will mean it's unlikely to be replaced.

4 May 2020

Passive safety + active safety + larger + more insulation (probably) + widgets/trinkets/ = more weight. 

Weight is inevitable today.

 

Anyway, given the global development I see very few people buying new expensive(ish) hot hatches.

4 May 2020

I owned a 205GTI 1.9 and did many miles in a company 309 GTI, both were great cars, the 309 in particular had a proper sprinkle of magic dust in its balance. Peugoet would have a real winner if this could be replicated. They were of there time though, I remember a drive down the M4 London to Wiltshire, massive headache and ears ringing at the end of it. There were real downsides to the 205 and cars this age. Fiesta ST is much better in reality.      

4 May 2020

when they see a rival listed in a new car's description on Autocar? "Rival". It's such inflammatory, childish, nonsense.

4 May 2020

And it totally isn't a German thing. The tests rave on about the Honda Civic Type R and the Hyundai I30 N and the RS and ST Focus. 

The Peugeot is just a less well made Golf. It looks like a Golf - i.e. a bit dull, and it might have Mahle pistons like a Ferrari, but it also has the same engine that used to be in the MINI and is in the previous model 208 GTi and it has a poor reputation, so if you want something like a Golf, then just buy a Golf because it's better made and more reliable. If you want something "boy racer", buy the Civic. If you want something different buy the I30 N and the Focus is between the Civic and the Golf.

And I'll believe this car when I see it! Autocar went on and on about the new 208 GTi, with a choice of petrol or electric, and where is that car? It doesn't exist at all!

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