Jaguar envisions the future of the car after 2040, with a removable AI steering wheel becoming the hub of drivers’ needs
Jimi Beckwith
7 September 2017

Jaguar has revealed the Future-Type - its vision of the car for 2040 and beyond, equipped with what it calls the steering wheel’s future: an artificially intelligent, voice-activated steering wheel that's removable from the car. 

The Future-Type is fully autonomous and is a virtual representation of what cars will become when shared rather than owned outright. The concept was revealed at Jaguar Land Rover's first Tech Fest event today.

The car has a narrow body with 2+1 seating, which is intended to optimise urban driving and parking. There is also an option for face-to-face seating for socialising in autonomous-driving mode. 

Jaguar design director Ian Callum described it as “an advanced research project” and said it offered an “insight into the potential for driving and car ownership in the future”.

The steering wheel device is named Sayer, after famed Jaguar designer Malcolm Sayer. It will be the only part of the car owned by the driver in a future where mobility solutions replace car ownership. 

The Sayer is designed to be brought into its owner’s home and used in a similar fashion to Amazon’s voice-command device Alexa. It can even know what’s in your fridge and order your groceries, as connectivity in cars reaches new heights in the coming years. 

Jaguar said the wheel is, in essence, a member card for its on-demand service club, which would offer sole ownership or the option of car-sharing.

The company claims that the Sayer will calculate your journey based on the time you get up and will offer control of the car to the driver at points when it thinks the journey will be fun to drive. 

The Sayer was presented in a concept showcased at the JLR Tech Fest. The concept was accompanied by a keynote from JLR CEO Ralf Speth.

Read more: 

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Futuristic Rinspeed Oasis in Detroit - new pics of driverless concept

Apple driverless car project killed by lack of direction, say employees

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First drive: Peugeot Instinct concept review

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Comments
5

6 September 2017

I can steer a “virtual car” as well as accelerate and brake, using my mobile phone. Why would I want to lug a big steering wheel around? A truer vision of the future would’ve been two extending handles either end of my mobile’s protective case, and my mobile linked to any car’s Drive-by-wire system via WiFi and an encrypted password.

my mobile already has all the gubbins it needs to do this stuff, including voice control and AI, via Siri or Cortaba, or Google.

car companies and mobile and accessory manufacturers, take note. 

6 September 2017
Theojw71 wrote:

I can steer a “virtual car” as well as accelerate and brake, using my mobile phone. Why would I want to lug a big steering wheel around? A truer vision of the future would’ve been two extending handles either end of my mobile’s protective case, and my mobile linked to any car’s Drive-by-wire system via WiFi and an encrypted password.

my mobile already has all the gubbins it needs to do this stuff, including voice control and AI, via Siri or Cortana, or Google.

car companies and mobile and accessory manufacturers, take note. 

7 September 2017

Beware of using Siri etc, hacker have found that you can send commands to voice activasted devices using frequencies higher than the human ear can hear.  Might be scary in the car.

7 September 2017
Theojw71 wrote:

I can steer a “virtual car” as well as accelerate and brake, using my mobile phone. Why would I want to lug a big steering wheel around? A truer vision of the future would’ve been two extending handles either end of my mobile’s protective case, and my mobile linked to any car’s Drive-by-wire system via WiFi and an encrypted password.

my mobile already has all the gubbins it needs to do this stuff, including voice control and AI, via Siri or Cortaba, or Google.

car companies and mobile and accessory manufacturers, take note. 

Exactly my immediate thought, this seems to be a strangely outdated idea of the future.

 

7 September 2017

Does seem a bit odd, so I get to work, hop out, and the car drives away since it's not mine; do I carry the steering wheel in my hand all the way into the office then plonk it as pride of place on my desk as an objet d'art?

I praise them for thinking outside the box and it's a nice idea to have something that's still "yours", as people still seem to like that (see people that prefer to buy CDs than digital copies even though it's less convenient), though I don't think a steering wheel is the way.

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