Currently reading: BMW to focus on electric power
Electrification is a must for meeting emissions targets, says BMW product chief
Jim Holder
News
2 mins read
29 November 2013

BMW’s head of product development has warned that electrification is the only way of meeting stringent emissions regulations in the future.

Herbert Diess, BMW’s board member for development, says that all BMW models will soon need to be sold with some form of electrification - be it in hybrid form or pure electric drive - even if it is not what customers are asking for.

Speaking to Autocar, Diess said: “The motivation is always sheer driving pleasure, whatever we do. Not everyone wants to take the bus or train. But that philosophy is under environmental pressure. Automotive is one of the most heavily regulated industries. What is coming in the future is not just a reaction to customer requests, but also regulation.”

Diess explained that European customers are likely to see most of the new electric-drive technology first, as regulations here are stricter than elsewhere.

“Europe is five to seven years ahead of the rest of the world in terms of where it is pushing us,” he said, citing European regulations that call for fleet average CO2 emissions of 95g/km by 2020. In comparison, the target in China is 119g/km and Japan’s is 117g/km by the same date, while the target in the US has been set at 102g/km by 2025.

“The challenge is in meeting 95g/km and delivering real driving pleasure,” said Diess. “We must also recognise that we are now hitting against a physical limit and it will be very difficult in the next 20 years to go to a 99g/km average, let alone 50g/km for the future. The only way to do that is to rely on a high percentage of electric cars.

“Electricification will be a central thread in what we do, be it plug-in hybrid, hybrid or full electrification. The i8 shows what’s possible even below 50g/km, but we will also offer all standard models with entry-level electrification. We will try to use the modular kit developed for the i3 and i8 on a kit basis.” 

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Maxecat 29 November 2013

Electric cars? Electric trains? Electric aircraft?

Here in Wales there is not a single mile of electrified rail yet although there have been electric trains in use for over 100 years. Will electric cars take as long to be in common use? With the UK aviation industry's use of oil climbing yearly, it is over half the number of litres of petrol currently used, will Airbus or Boeing be forced to develop electric aircraft or aircraft use be restricted by law or taxes so fuel use declines? If not why should it only apply to road transport and air be exempt? How will the Auto industry change if only expensive to buy electric or electric hybrid cars can be bought? What taxes will be brought in to compensate the treasury for the loss of billions of pounds taxes from oil road fuels and VED taxes when electric cars are the majority in the UK? Surely any reduction of tax income from oil and VED taxes will be added to the cost of electric motoring somehow.
Bullfinch 2 December 2013

Fascinating questions

- but way beyond the scope and understanding of petrolheads, car magazines and even car manufacturers.
superstevie 29 November 2013

While I get the argument of

While I get the argument of where the co2 to make the electricity comes from, for that argument to be valid, you need to add in the co2 for the creation of petrol/diesel to conventional cars
xxxx 29 November 2013

so true

superstevie wrote:
While I get the argument of where the co2 to make the electricity comes from, for that argument to be valid, you need to add in the co2 for the creation of petrol/diesel to conventional cars
Not forgetting the enegy to create and supply the oil for the use in making Petrol build extra Oil rigs, run them, build the tankers, sail them, supply the garages etc..
kendwilcox47 29 November 2013

Its all a con

What a pity some do not seem to understand that EVs are a waste of time space and money, and I don't care what BMW say.
artill 29 November 2013

superstevie wrote: While I

superstevie wrote:
While I get the argument of where the co2 to make the electricity comes from, for that argument to be valid, you need to add in the co2 for the creation of petrol/diesel to conventional cars
Then should all new cars with a CO2 figure for what was used to make the car and its batteries? Some years ago the Americans did a whole of life study into cars including their construction, and use, and disposal. The most eco vehicle you could buy at the time. A Prius? A Diesel Golf? A city car? Not a chance. It was the petrol powered Jeep Wrangler. Simple to make, lasts for ever. Cant get more eco than that
superstevie 30 November 2013

artill wrote: superstevie

artill wrote:
superstevie wrote:
While I get the argument of where the co2 to make the electricity comes from, for that argument to be valid, you need to add in the co2 for the creation of petrol/diesel to conventional cars
Then should all new cars with a CO2 figure for what was used to make the car and its batteries? Some years ago the Americans did a whole of life study into cars including their construction, and use, and disposal. The most eco vehicle you could buy at the time. A Prius? A Diesel Golf? A city car? Not a chance. It was the petrol powered Jeep Wrangler. Simple to make, lasts for ever. Cant get more eco than that
I remember that study, it was a great one. There was a British version as well. Smart fortwo topped the list, with the smart roadster number two. A Prius was in joint place with a lotus Elise in 8th. And in answer to your question, yes I think they should include that figure, which should be included in the taxation of car
xxxx 29 November 2013

All change, for the good

Not a mention of hydrogen power and bear in mind they, James May the Telegrapgh, were all for it with the Hydrogen powered 7 series some 6 years ago. Hopefully the H bomb idea can now be buried. The only bad thing with all these manufacturers coming on board with the plug-in electric car is that the goverment will bring in road charging, remember they can't charge tax on the same power source as what powers your toaster and if they charge a form of Car electric road tax was does that say for their green policies!

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