From £27,500
Supercharged Elise delivers serious pace and spellbinding handling. For this money, no other roadster is as special to drive

Our Verdict

Lotus Elise

Is the Lotus Elise still the last word in open-top British sports car fun?

  • First Drive

    Lotus Elise Sprint 2017 review

    The latest incarnation of the Elise may be out of its depth on track, but on the public road it is probably the purest version since the original
  • First Drive

    Lotus Elise S

    Supercharged Elise delivers serious pace and spellbinding handling. For this money, no other roadster is as special to drive

What is it?

In its 16th year of production and still going strong, the Lotus Elise now richly deserves recognition as one of Britain’s all-time sporting greats. But its reputation hasn’t been delivered on exquisite handling alone; giant-killing performance has, for most of the car’s life, also been a big part of the mystique. And since the 2011 model year revision and the demise of Elise R and SC, it’s been a missing part.

But not now that Hethel’s released its new ‘S’ version of its junior two-seater. Using a Toyota 1.8-litre ‘2ZR-FE’ engine force-fed by a Magnuson supercharger, the new Elise S develops 217bhp at 6800rpm – the same maximum power figure as the fizzy old ‘SC’. But it also produces much more torque than the last fast Elise: 184lb ft at 4600rpm, up from 156lb ft at 5000rpm. And this from a car that still weighs plenty less than a tonne, even with fluids on board.

What’s it like?

The transformation of the basic ‘Series III’ Elise’s performance is pronounced. While the 1.6-litre car takes almost 19 seconds to get 100mph from a standing start, the Elise S does it in little more than 11 seconds. 62mph comes up in 4.6; and while that’s almost a second sooner than it does in Porsche’s more powerful, more expensive new Boxster, it’s also quicker than the ‘991’ 911 Carrera we road-tester earlier this year. Welcome back, David: you have been missed.

This latest Elise seems to want for nothing in terms of accelerative pace. We discovered as much in a first test of the car conducted at Lotus’ own circuit at Hethel. No road driving was possible, so observations about the car’s road ride will have to wait. But we can report that extra power and grip hasn’t blunted the Elise’s dynamic responses in the slightest.

That engine catches in undramatic fashion when you thumb the starter button. There’s a little supercharger whine when you flick the dainty right-hand pedal, but none of the evil crackle-and-pop audio fireworks that the old ‘SC’ supplied. So it’s perhaps a less characterful engine we’re dealing with this time around, and reaches a generous but much less frantic peak power output than the old car did, as it screamed away at 8000rpm.

Pin the accelerator from lower crank speeds, however, and you’ll soon appreciate the extra torque. The new engine not only hits its loftier torque peak 400rpm earlier than the old one, it also produces much more twist throughout the entirety of the usable rev range. Flat out at 3000rpm, for example – where the 1.6-litre Elise is producing 111lb ft and the old 1.8-litre SC 125lb ft – the new Elise S surfs forward on a swell of 166lb ft.

Which means that, in any of its first four gears, the car will tear out of corners and down straights with a ferocity that’s really only been known to Lotus’ Exige and 2-Eleven owners until now. Fully extend the car and you’ll be beyond 100mph, with the wind whistling just above and around your head, before there’s any noticeable let-up in your rate of acceleration. On the road or on a trackday, hot hatches and most sports coupes would be easy meat.

And still, even endowed with that speed, it’s not the impression of the Elise S’ outright performance that stays with you. Sixteen years after Artioli’s grand-daughter donated her name, it’s the same perfect poise with which this car glides around a corner that sets it apart.

It’s that incredible, tender chassis balance; the wonderfully informative, totally uncorrupted steering; those serious levels of grip and body control to tap into when you’re carving a smooth, fast line; and most of all, the uncommon amicability and trustworthiness of the car’s responses, at and beyond the limit, that really distinguish it.

This is a mid-engined roadster to take unbelievable liberties with. Its lightness and simplicity allow it to take lap after lap of flat-out track pace without so much as overheating a brake disc – a rare quality at the more affordable end of the performance market. And when your appetite for speed and precision is satisfied, it’s a car you can chuck into a tight bend on a trailing throttle without a second thought of a spin; that will grip at its front wheels, and slip from its rears, with benign predictability. That last bit hasn’t always been such a convincing part of the Elise’s dynamic repertoire; it’s taken time to make the car so controllable on the limit, as anyone who’s ever run out of steering lock while correcting a skid in a ‘Series I’ Elise will confirm.

But, with this new Elise S, you’ll have no such problems. The car’s extra power and torque makes the rear-end as mobile, and the handling as three-dimensional, as you’d ever want it to be. But only if you want it to be.

Should I buy one?

Thirty-six thousand pounds sounds a lot to ask for any Elise – mostly because of this car’s lengthy history, and the fact that we all remember when you could buy one for twenty.

But by 2012 standards, it makes this car competitively priced next to the new Porsche Boxster, the BMW Z4 28i and the Nissan 370Z Roadster. Now, as ever, Elise buyers have to accept a compromise on material quality, refinement and usability relative to those rivals. But no longer do they have to compromise one jot on performance – and certainly not on handling purity.

Lotus Elise S

Price: £36,200; 0-62mph: 4.6sec; Top speed: 145mph; Economy: 37.5mpg; CO2: 175g/km (combined); Kerb weight: 924kg; Engine: 4 cyls, 1798cc, supercharged, petrol; Installation: Mid, transverse, RWD; Power: 217bhp at 6800rpm; Torque: 184lb ft at 4600rpm; Gearbox: 6-spd manual

Join the debate

Comments
20

2 May 2012

This car looks to be excellent, although I'd be tempted by the basic 1.6.

2 May 2012

Me too. As amusing as hitting 100 in 11 seconds must be, it doesn't allow you to really extend the engine through the gears and give it a good thrashing on a very twisty B-road like the 1.6 would. It'd be short bursts of part throttle everywhere. Fun but not as satisfying I imagine as properly working the engine.

2 May 2012

"Now, as ever, Elise buyers have to accept a compromise on material quality, refinement and usability" Why?

2 May 2012

[quote Boris911]

"Now, as ever, Elise buyers have to accept a compromise on material quality, refinement and usability" Why?

[/quote]

Because the more sound insulation, comfort features, cabin space and luggage space you add to such a car, the heavier and bulkier it will become and the worse it will be as a pure sports car. And because the more you spend on raw materials, the more it will have to cost.

Anyone who believes they can get something for nothing is living in dreamland.

2 May 2012

[quote Submariner Redux]

[quote Boris911]

"Now, as ever, Elise buyers have to accept a compromise on material quality, refinement and usability" Why?

[/quote]

Because the more sound insulation, comfort features, cabin space and luggage space you add to such a car, the heavier and bulkier it will become and the worse it will be as a pure sports car. And because the more you spend on raw materials, the more it will have to cost.

Anyone who believes they can get something for nothing is living in dreamland.

[/quote]

For £33.5k (or is that £36k? The writer seems to be confused on this point), quality should not be a compromise. Quality should not be a compromise in a £7k KIA, let alone in a relatively very simple car like an Elise.

Refinement and useability yes, the buyer chooses to compromise on these due to the fundamental nature of the car, but quality.....NO!

This is one of the reasons that Lotus are selling so few cars. The buying public will not simply accept the myth that its worth putting up with poor quality just to own a Lotus.

Personally I love the Elise and all it stands for, but my money would go on the Boxster.

2 May 2012

[quote Submariner Redux]

Because the more sound insulation, comfort features, cabin space and luggage space you add to such a car, the heavier and bulkier it will become and the worse it will be as a pure sports car. And because the more you spend on raw materials, the more it will have to cost.

[/quote]I would suggest it's exactly that sort of thinking that has got Lotus into the mess its in today.

2 May 2012

[quote curious_insider]Personally I love the Elise and all it stands for, but my money would go on the Boxster. [/quote]

As does nearly everybody elses 'curious_insider'. It's not exactly rocket science is it, yet it continues to elude the suits at Lotus.

3 May 2012

[quote Boris911]

[quote curious_insider]Personally I love the Elise and all it stands for, but my money would go on the Boxster. [/quote]

As does nearly everybody elses 'curious_insider'.[/quote] Speak for yourself. I'd go for a used S2000 or a 350Z or a Z4. Go for the Boxster if you're a soulless square. Go for one of the others if you have a pulse.

3 May 2012

[quote Boris911]As does nearly everybody elses 'curious_insider'. It's not exactly rocket science is it, yet it continues to elude the suits at Lotus.[/quote]

Exactly, there are plenty of people who can spend this amount on a car, but it probably has to be their only car and in that case the Boxster, or even Z4, SLK options look far preferable.

As a second car this Elise would be wonderful, but I suspect the few people who can afford this sort of amount for a track-day car buy something more focussed like a Caterham, or can afford or prefer to have a GT3, etc.

I think Lotus need to make a car that is usable everyday (even if only just about), I mean I may be able to get by with a VX220 as an everday car, but no way an Elise.

3 May 2012

[quote curious_insider]

Quality should not be a compromise in a £7k KIA, let alone in a relatively very simple car like an Elise.

Refinement and useability yes, the buyer chooses to compromise on these due to the fundamental nature of the car, but quality.....NO!

[/quote]

Agreed, there should be no compromise on quality. Perhaps when the Elise came out originally there were enough people willing to compromise, but TVR seen the end of those people; that a broken toy is no toy at all.

But the performance does sound fantastic. The 1.6 is just a joke of a sports car with simply not enough grunt. Something close to the S in performance but at the entry level price would give Lotus their Mojo back.

Although the nose of the car still looks like a cheap rip off of an S2 Elise!

Pages

Add your comment

Log in or register to post comments

Find an Autocar car review

Driven this week

  • Lexus LC500
    Car review
    20 October 2017
    Futuristic Lexus LC coupé mixes the latest technology with an old-school atmospheric V8
  • Maserati Levante S GranSport
    First Drive
    20 October 2017
    Get ready to trade in your diesels: Maserati’s luxury SUV finally gets the engine it’s always needed
  • Jaguar XF Sportbrake TDV6
    First Drive
    19 October 2017
    The handsome Jaguar XF Sportbrake exhibits all the hallmarks that makes the saloon great, and with the silky smooth diesel V6 makes it a compelling choice
  • Volkswagen T-Roc TDI
    First Drive
    19 October 2017
    Volkswagen's new compact crossover has the looks, the engineering and the build quality to be a resounding success, but not with this diesel engine
  • BMW M550i
    First Drive
    19 October 2017
    The all-paw M550i is a fast, effortless mile-muncher, but there's a reason why it won't be sold in the UK