One of Lexus’s main motivations in swapping GS for ES in Europe was the opportunity to be more aggressive with pricing – and it has opened up the books as you would expect.

The high-looking price of our fully loaded Takumi test car, on which the only available cost option is metallic paint, is a bit of a red herring. An entry-level ES 300h will cost you over £1000 less this year than an equivalent GS hybrid would have in 2016.

Matt Prior

Matt Prior

Editor-at-large
High level of standard spec contributes to Lexus’s competitive residuals against PHEV rivals

Move up to mid-range F Sport trim and the ES is cheaper than its predecessor by almost £5000, and undercuts a nearest-equivalent Audi A6 40 TDI S Line S tronic by a not dissimilar figure. With more margin in the ES to allow dealers to cut a finance deal than the GS ever had, impressive residuals forecast and low associated benefit-in-kind tax, buyers can expect this to be an attractive option in value-for-money terms.

Running costs for the car should be strong, too. Our test car returned 48.8mpg on our habitual touring fuel economy test, where a current BMW 520d returned 52.4mpg in 2017.

Balanced against relative gains for the ES in heavier traffic and around town, it should certainly be frugal in everyday use.

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