Currently reading: Porsche: Turbo-free 911 Carrera “not really feasible”
Sports car boss Frank-Steffen Walliser has the "desire" for a non-GT 911, but "the research and development costs are too high"
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2 mins read
16 June 2020

Porsche won't follow the recent return of naturally aspirated engines to the 718 Boxster and 718 Cayman with a turbo-free 911 Carrera, its sports car boss has revealed.

Speaking to Autocar before the unveiling of the new 911 Targa, Frank-Steffen Walliser admitted that it’s “not really feasible” to take Porsche’s new 4.0-litre engine (which is found in the Cayman GT4 and Boxster Spyder and detuned for use in the Cayman GTS and Boxster GTS) and spend money on rotating it 180deg for use in the rear of the 911.

When asked if there’s a desire for natural aspiration to return to the 911 in non-GT form, Walliser said: “You ask if there’s a desire. I will not deny that. But the reality tells me it will not happen. I would love to do something like that… [but] the research and development costs are too high to develop such an engine for the Carrera.”

Turbocharger-free power will reappear in the next 911 GT3, which is expected to be shown in the coming months.

GT division boss Andreas Preuninger told Autocar: “Our philosophy in GT cars is to stay naturally aspirated.”

Walliser also spoke of the much-discussed hybrid 911, which is due later in the 992 generation’s life. Porsche has a number of technical hurdles to clear before it can launch this model, with the “biggest burden” being managing the additional weight of electric powertrain components.

Space is another issue, said Walliser: “We have to package everything, because the car is relatively small. We don’t want to give up the 2+2 layout, the architecture or the shape of the car, because these are part of the 911 story.”

“Return on investment”, meaning the balance of the compromises versus the end result of greater power and efficiency, is a focus for Porsche with the hybrid 911.

READ MORE

Porsche 718 Cayman and Boxster GTS bring back six-cylinder power 

Porsche: No electric 911 until at least 2030 

New 992-series Porsche 911: mild hybrid and plug-in hybrid versions detailed

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Nickktod 17 June 2020

Feasible how?

Surely the N/A 4.0 in the 718 GTS models is just a bored/stroked version of the 3.0 Carrera motors without the turbos? If so why wouldn't it just drop straight in, give or take a few inexpensive tweaks? I suspect the real issue here is that a 992 with this motor (Carrera T? Club Sport?) would sell in huge numbers while creating a CO2 fines headache for the company. Maybe an opportunity for a "less costs more" model which Porsche are so good at - I'd take one over a Carrera S and never give the missing 50bhp a second thought. 

Just Saying 16 June 2020

Hi Frank

Keep up the good work matey.
911's will always sell!
Lessis More 16 June 2020

I'm very clear that it's

I'm very clear that it's exactly what I wish for.  I want them to make new cars I want, not new cars I don't.  I don't need to go 450-500bhp-fast on the roads.  And try flooring a 992 Carrera S from standstill *without* launch control switched on - it takes about 2 seconds before anything of note happens because of the, sigh, turbos.  On the move throttle response isn't much better, despite what the mags would have us believe.  It's just not much fun in the real world.

So until they lose the turbos, I have to agree with seaton that an older NA 911 is a far superior proposition vs the currently manufactured 2+2 offering.  Older ones weren't too slow when new, they still aren't, and they're so much more enjoyable to drive.  (also avoid the 991.1 due to its awful electric steering)

 

 

manicm 16 June 2020

Lessis More wrote:

Lessis More wrote:

I'm very clear that it's exactly what I wish for.  I want them to make new cars I want, not new cars I don't.  I don't need to go 450-500bhp-fast on the roads.  And try flooring a 992 Carrera S from standstill *without* launch control switched on - it takes about 2 seconds before anything of note happens because of the, sigh, turbos.  On the move throttle response isn't much better, despite what the mags would have us believe.  It's just not much fun in the real world.

So until they lose the turbos, I have to agree with seaton that an older NA 911 is a far superior proposition vs the currently manufactured 2+2 offering.  Older ones weren't too slow when new, they still aren't, and they're so much more enjoyable to drive.  (also avoid the 991.1 due to its awful electric steering)

 

So you want a relatively low-powered engine in a heavy car? Oh well I guess it takes all-sorts to keep the earth turning.

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