Transport for London announces plans to boost uptake in electric vehicles and reduce urban pollution

Transport for London will install 1500 new electric car chargers on the capital’s streets between now and 2020 in a bid to boost consumer uptake in zero-emission vehicles.

Announced by Mayor of London Sadiq Khan, the residential points aim to provide energy access to those without off-street parking to enable overnight charging. They will add to the network of rapid charge points - which can charge electric vehicles to around 80% in about 30 minutes - already being rolled out across the city.

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Twenty-five of London’s 32 boroughs will receive the investment, which is predicted to reach £4.5 million. The move is part of plans to transform London into a zero-carbon-transport city by the middle of this century.

“This substantial investment in electric charging points will make a real difference, making electric vehicles an easier and more practical option for Londoners across our city,” said Khan. “We have a bold ambition to make London’s transport system zero emission by 2050, and working with boroughs to roll out more charging infrastructure is a vital part of making this a reality.”

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The boroughs of Richmond upon Thames, Hounslow and Westminster have recently helped to boost London’s charge point total by integrating EV plugs into heritage street lamps. The retrofitted lamps, which were already undergoing energy-saving LED conversions, are seen as a cost-effective way of improving access to electric charge points.

Khan recently slammed the Government’s latest air quality plan in an article in The Times, calling it “woefully inadequate” due to vehicle excise duty changes that he believes fail to encourage people into lower-emission vehicles.

His staunch approach to tackling air-quality issues relates to London’s ranking as one of Europe’s most polluted cities. He will introduce a new Toxicity Charge (T-Charge) from 23 October, penalising the highest-polluting vehicles with a £10 fee to enter central London.

One of London’s most polluted streets, Brixton Road, exceeded this year’s European limit for air-quality breaches just five days into 2017.

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11

4 August 2017
Which operator will install them? The new ones installed by Source London are lightly used outside Central London due to 3.6p / minute tariff which makes PHEVs cheaper to run on petrol.

4 August 2017

Here is a scenario. You live in a house which has no off road parking so the only possible way to charge your vehicle is either draping a cable from your home across a footway or road to your car, which is parked on the carriageway, or to charge your car from a charging point, whether it be a stand-alone feature or attached to an existing street light column.

Now, on some older roads, such as Victorian terraced roads, the footways are narrow which is the reason so many street light columns are to the rear of the footway to enable people, buggies, wheelchairs etc to get pass uninterupted. You can see what the problem would be if a cable is plugged in to one of these columns...cables strewn across the footway. So the answer might be, well move the columns closer to the road so cables won't have to be draped along a footway. That's all very well, but current highway regulations stipulate that any furniture must me a minimum of 450mm from the edge of the footway. You can see the issue here....on a narrow footway there'd possibly be columns (and standalone charging points) in the middle of a footway blocking pedestrians etc.

So, why not widen the footway then? It's possible but then you narrow a road which would possibly restrict vehicular access and/or take away on-street parking from one side of a road, while it'd cost a packet to do.

And on many of these roads, street light columns only exist on one side of a road, so you'd still end up with cables strewn across the road.

And let us not forget that in such circumstances it's not always possible to park right outside your property or even on your road....

And remember there are hundreds of thousands of such properties in the country which are on roads with this very predicament.

 

4 August 2017

If a charger can charge a 30Kw battery to 80% in half an hour, it must be using 48Kw per hour.

Say each charger is in use 12 hours a day - that's 1500 * 12 *48 KW = 900 MW - who's paying for that?

But when you look at say 4 million cars in London, and each is charged to 80% once a week, don't you need 4 million half hour slots over 80 hours?

I make that 25,000 chargers, assuming that no one leaves their car for more than 30 minutes and the next car couples up immediately. Factor in driving round looking for a charger and things look a bit messy.

Finally - 25,000 chargers running at 48KW require 1200 MW of power.12 hours a day. That's a new power statoin just for London then - let's hope it doesn't run on fossil fuel!!!

 

4 August 2017
NavalReserve wrote:

If a charger can charge a 30Kw battery to 80% in half an hour, it must be using 48Kw per hour.

Say each charger is in use 12 hours a day - that's 1500 * 12 *48 KW = 900 MW - who's paying for that?

But when you look at say 4 million cars in London, and each is charged to 80% once a week, don't you need 4 million half hour slots over 80 hours?

I make that 25,000 chargers, assuming that no one leaves their car for more than 30 minutes and the next car couples up immediately. Factor in driving round looking for a charger and things look a bit messy.

Finally - 25,000 chargers running at 48KW require 1200 MW of power.12 hours a day. That's a new power statoin just for London then - let's hope it doesn't run on fossil fuel!!!

Some interesting points but you're assuming things change overnight and no one charges at home or work.

I think fossil fuels are less than 50% now and declining all the time whilst Solar and wind especially increasing their share day by day. Ditto with Nuclear going forward

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

4 August 2017

I agree that 1,500 chargers in 5 years is pathetic but the worst case is a bit pessimistic too. Many drivers in London, like me, do very low mileage and won't need to charge every week. In the suburbs lots of people have driveways so won't need public chargers either and I don't see the switch to electro being complete until 2050 or so giving us time to accelerate things. Maybe at some point inductive road charging will come in which will solve the cables problem.

4 August 2017
xxxx wrote:

You're assuming things change overnight and no one charges at home or work.

I think fossil fuels are less than 50% now and declining all the time whilst Solar and wind especially increasing their share day by day. Ditto with Nuclear going forward

I was assuming that people would charge during the day - otherwise, there'd be a lot of peolple around at 3 am or so looking for a spare charging point, waiting half an hour until the car is charged and then finding a parking place away from the charger - provided that no naughty person leaves their car at the charging point overnight...

 

One more thought - a wind turbine can produce 3 MW - so 400 should do the trick if there's a good wind. 

4 August 2017

As we speak Wind is proving 14.86% of the national needs and Solar a whooping 15.57% (approx) although this figure seems strangely high). Nuclear is 21.0%

Fossil:- Coal 1.07% and gas 30%

 

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

4 August 2017
xxxx wrote:

As we speak Wind is proving 14.86% of the national needs and Solar a whooping 15.57% (approx) although this figure seems strangely high). Nuclear is 21.0%

Fossil:- Coal 1.07% and gas 30%

I agree it looks good today, but...

87% of the current nuclear generation capacity will close by 2030

A couple of times this week the wind contribution dropped from nearly 6% to just over 1% - unfortunately this was at night when the Solar contribution is somewhat limited ;-)

 

4 August 2017

The wind contribution dropped from 6 GW to 1 GW - sorry!

4 August 2017

There are 2.6 million cars in London. This plan will deliver 1500 residential charging points by 2020, and all new internal combustion engines will be banned by 2040? This is a comical, pathetic and poorly thought-through response to the challenges of the future.

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