Currently reading: 2019 Suzuki Jimny UK pricing revealed
Prices and specifications have been announced for the next-generation off-roader
Sam Sheehan
News
3 mins read
2 October 2018

UK prices and specification details for the new Suzuki Jimny have been revealed as first deliveries of the SUV approach. 

The Jimny, on sale now, costs from £15,499 for the entry-level SZ4 with a manual gearbox, rising to £18,999 for an automatic variant of the top specification SZ5. A manual SZ5 is available from £17,999.

Metallic and dual tone paint finishes are available as options for £485 and £650 respectively on all trim specifications. 

A 1.5-litre naturally aspirated unit replaces the outgoing Jimny's 1.3-litre engine. It produces 101bhp and 96lb ft of torque for a claimed top speed of 90mph.

No diesel version of the Jimny is planned, with Suzuki having recently cut all diesel options from its line-up.

Talking to Autocar, Suzuki’s UK boss, Dale Wyatt, said 4500 UK buyers had signed up on the website as “interested” in the Jimny by October 2017 - the first time it has had such a level of interest.

That’s 150% of the previous model’s best annual sales volume; the last Jimny ended at 1100 units annually in UK after 20 years. The problem is going to be volume supplied, says Wyatt. Demand in Japan, where the Jimny is made, has been “staggering”. Wyatt sees scope in allocating 1100 cars for the UK in the new Jimny's first year, then 2000 subsequently.

The Jimny will offer five-speed manual and four-speed automatic gearboxes, with a part-time four-wheel drive system channelling power to the rear wheels normal use and with high and low-range modes. Suzuki swapped the manual low-range gear selector in the latest Vitara for an electric rotary dial, but the new Jimny sticks with the former system to maximise its off-road adjustability.

Like its predecessor, the new Jimny is built on a ladder-frame chassis, but it now has additional crossmembers to increase rigidity. It also gets three-link rigid axle suspension for off-road agility. The fourth-generation model has been developed with the feedback of existing Jimny owners in mind, who rank its effective off-road capabilities and robustness more highly than on-road performance.

Suzuki claims the Jimny can drive up inclines with a 37deg approach angle and a 49deg departure angle. Ground clearance is 210mm.

We took a drive in the new Jimny - take a look

The car's design reflects its 4x4 status, taking influence from earlier Jimnys through the simple, box-shaped body, vertical grille and round headlights with separate indicators. Much of the design appears similar to that applied to the latest Mercedes-Benz G-Class, such as the squared-off wheel arches and tail-lights located low on the bumper.

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The Jimny's interior, meanwhile, gains modern features such as a 7.0in touchscreen infotainment system with Bluetooth. However, the overall design remains chunky, with function favoured over form to enable users to operate controls and buttons while wearing gloves.

New safety systems have also been added, including automatic emergency braking, lane departure warning and traffic sign detection, the latter being a first for any Suzuki model.

Two folding rear seats allow for up to 377 litres of luggage space, which is 53 litres more than in the old Jimny. The new model rides 20mm higher on 15in alloy wheels, but overall length has reduced slightly to 3480mm.

The larger Vitara is currently Suzuki's best-selling model, achieving UK sales of about 12,000 units per year, and further growth is expected.

The brand's decision to ignore the temptation to build a more mainstream Jimny should ensure that sales remain small compared with those of other compact SUVs. Around 1200 Jimnys are sold per year in Britain - a figure that has remained consistent since the outgoing version launched in 1998. The new car is expected to comfortably beat this while leading a charge to grow Suzuki sales by 20%.

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BornFree 13 January 2019

A new JIMNY !!!

I can’t wait much longer to get one of these; I have the outgoing Jimny an auto with 25k miles under its belt. I have a couple of other motors currently and I can honestly say out of all the cars I have had over the years my Jimny is the best car to put a smile on your face since I had a pair of brilliant Lotus Elans way back in the sixties. I feel like a big kid I can just imagine what’s coming.

Beastie_Boy 19 November 2018

So, not the leftfield city car I’d hoped it would be...

its NCAP scores were poor, it’s not especially frugal, it’s probably noisy and unrefined... but I still want one.

5cylinder 20 November 2018

Beastie_Boy wrote:

Beastie_Boy wrote:

its NCAP scores were poor, it’s not especially frugal, it’s probably noisy and unrefined... but I still want one.

Dacia Duster didn't do very well in NCAP, but it didn't seem to hinder it's sales.
From what I understand from another review, the Jimny's poor score was partially down to an airbag fault, which would be easily rectified.

Sundym 19 November 2018

Eurocap

Didn't it do very poorly in recent eurocap safety tests ? Don't care how cute it looks , driving a high sided narrow tracked vehicle with poor safety isn't that smart, only reminds me of 1 other vehicle... the suzuki jimny from the 80s that a mate owned and rolled.
289 19 November 2018

@ sundym

Thats true Sundym, it didnt do so well in the NCAP test. But I dont see it as the sort of vehicle you would travel the length and breadth of our motorway network in.

I see it as a second (or even third) vehicle for popping to the shops in for country people....perfect for dodging along narrow lanes where you will probably never reach 50 mph anyway.

Looking at the space under the wheel arches, I am pretty sure you could add some wheel spacers if you wanted a slightly wider stance for traversing side-slopes.

It will also be the darling of Gamekeepers in jungle Green, where its light weight, narrow stance and good ground clearance/approach/ departure angles will be a real asset. And with a nice quiet petrol engine the poachers wont hear you creeping up on them!

Brilliant little vehicle and good on Suzuki for avoiding the temptation to make it 'trendy' rather than 'useful'.

Perfect for Scottish Highlands use where ruggedness is still valued, perfect for West Country single track lanes. Ideal when bad weather closes in everywhere.

May even be better than a Panda 4x4.

230SL 19 November 2018

289 wrote:

289 wrote:

Thats true Sundym, it didnt do so well in the NCAP test. But I dont see it as the sort of vehicle you would travel the length and breadth of our motorway network in.

I see it as a second (or even third) vehicle for popping to the shops in for country people....perfect for dodging along narrow lanes where you will probably never reach 50 mph anyway.

Looking at the space under the wheel arches, I am pretty sure you could add some wheel spacers if you wanted a slightly wider stance for traversing side-slopes.

It will also be the darling of Gamekeepers in jungle Green, where its light weight, narrow stance and good ground clearance/approach/ departure angles will be a real asset. And with a nice quiet petrol engine the poachers wont hear you creeping up on them!

Brilliant little vehicle and good on Suzuki for avoiding the temptation to make it 'trendy' rather than 'useful'.

Perfect for Scottish Highlands use where ruggedness is still valued, perfect for West Country single track lanes. Ideal when bad weather closes in everywhere.

May even be better than a Panda 4x4.

Motorways are the safest roads, it is the country roads which are the real killers, would be nice to be alive when they cut you out, so they can call the air ambulance. It is a shame that the Suzuki does n't have a better safety rating.

289 19 November 2018

@ 230SL

I think you are over reacting here SL. I have lived in the countryside all my life and most of the accidents here are caused by city types who arent used to Mud/Ice on the road and are oblivious to the dangers of Farm machinery. Despite the stats, few country people have a problem and mostly live very long lives barring illness.

The results of the full NCAP were pretty good for occupants and even better for children (73% & 83%) 

It was marked down for not having Isofix (big deal) and for lack of safety systems (more to go wrong and not necessary in the countryside), and pedestrian  protection....not really an issue in the sticks, so it isnt the 'death trap' you are portraying. Probably a hell of a lot safer than a Defender!

Unfortunately the laws of physics cant be beaten.....the bigger the car the easier it is to build in extra tech and protection. In this case it would be self-defeating for intended purpose.

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