Currently reading: New Porsche 911 Turbo S packs 641bhp for 205mph
Flagship Honda NSX rival gains enhanced aerodynamics and increased performance over its predecessor
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2 mins read
3 March 2020

The range-topping icon has returned to Porsche’s latest 911 line-up with the launch of the new Turbo. The 992-series sports car has been re-engineered to create the biggest step up in performance in the boosted variant’s 45-year history.

Unveiled in both coupé and cabriolet bodystyles, the Honda NSX rival retains a turbocharged 3.8-litre flat-six petrol engine. However, the rear-mounted unit is described as being “completely new” as well as having a new cooling and intake system. The variable-vane turbochargers introduced on the previous 911 Turbo have also been revised, with larger turbine and compressor wheels.

In combination with a host of other changes, power has risen by as much as 69bhp and torque has advanced by up to 37lb ft. This pushes the output of the top-of-the-line 911 Turbo S (the first to be revealed) to 641bhp and 590lb ft between 2500rpm and 4500rpm.

Unlike before, peak torque is no longer limited for brief periods of full-throttle acceleration but available on demand.

The reworked engine channels its increased reserves via a new eight-speed dual-clutch gearbox and a four-wheel drive system that can now deliver up to 369lb ft of torque to the front wheels.

This gives the 911 Turbo S a 0-62mph time of just 2.7sec – 0.2sec quicker than its predecessor – and a top speed of 205mph.

Porsche says the increase in performance brought by the new engine is particularly noticeable in the sprint to 120mph, which it claims is a full 1.0sec quicker than before, at just 8.9sec.

As well as being more powerful, the new 911 Turbo is wider than ever. Its width has increased by 20mm to 1900mm to accommodate a track that is now 42mm wider at the front and 10mm wider at the rear. The standard wheels for the 911 Turbo S are 20in up front and 21in at the rear, with 255/35-profile front and 315/30-profile rear tyres.

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Car review
Porsche 911 Turbo

Is the forced-induction 911 still the supercar you can use every day, or have new arrivals raised the bar for the segment?

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The added performance has led to the development of a new generation of Porsche’s ceramic composite brakes. Fitted as standard to the 911 Turbo S, they now use 10-piston calipers at the front for even greater stopping power.

Aerodynamic developments include a new pneumatically extendible front spoiler and larger surface area for the rear wing – a combination that Porsche claims delivers up to 15% more downforce than the model it replaces.

Inside, the new 911 Turbo benefits from the same interior upgrades brought to other 992-series 911 models, with a GT-style multi-function steering wheel, a 10.9in Porsche Communication Management display, the Sport Chrono package with Porsche Track Precision app, 18-way adjustable sports seats and a Bose sound system among the standard equipment.

Porsche has yet to announce details and UK pricing for the new range-topper. In Germany, the 911 Turbo S Coupé is priced from the equivalent of £155,970, while the 911 Turbo S Cabriolet starts at £165,127.

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Comments
14

3 March 2020

0 - 60 in 2.7 sec.  In a car designed and intended to be used on public roads.  Utter stupidity, this quest for more and more power and performance the likes of which no-one will be able to control unless their name is Lewis Hamilton.

Got to say though, it is a beautiful car, possibly the best looking 911 I have ever seen.

3 March 2020
I'd say a top speed of 205mph is even more pointless (and I do drive in Germany regularly). Acceleration will be the main focus in the new e-world and I'd say even more fun, as at least you can do 0-60 on a quiet UK road or for brisk overtaking. So for an ICE 0-60 it's impressive.

3 March 2020

LOL.

 

I had forgotten that Honda still made an NSX. I don't think Honda remembers they still make NSXs.

No one does.

3 March 2020

Meh! Get a C4 and a Litchfield chip for 560 HP and save a bunch of money.C4S already timed at 2.7 0-60 by C&D in standard 450 ho\p form

 

3 March 2020

they've finally put the rear number plate in the right place! 

Just looks SO much better with it located there, IMHO of course

3 March 2020

So we got a fatter 992 (by 50 kg) and a girthier 992 and a more complex 992 (an eigth speed for the PDK) for, well, practically nothing then ?!! 

Oh yes: we got two weighty GPFs (upto 20 kg: yikes...), a more complex 992, a wider-tracked 992... all to contain that much heralded 'hybrid drive'for, wait for it, absolutely no hybridity at all.

There's progress for you. If you're sitting on a 991.2 GT3 Touring manual: sit tight. It'll be a better bet than buying a pharma company who'll invent a covid-19 cure in the next 6 months. 

3 March 2020

Journos talk about the "sweet spot" in the range and it's never at the top.  This is the willy-wagger's 911.

3 March 2020

These cars totally lost connection to reality (saying this as owner of 570hp 997 Turbo).

Best public-road sportscar Porsche makes is Cayman/Boxster GTS.

3 March 2020

For Porsche, its customers and dealers there is a reason why this car exists the way it does. Sure, one can strip it back to get more speed with less but most 911 buyers don't want it that way and for those that do there are the GT/RS types of product. We can sneer at its speed but why?, its Porsche's pinnacle of the ultimate compromise of comfort and road car performance. There are other ways to go faster and in more comfort but the 911 Turbo's brief was to do both in a bulletproof fashion. Let's be happy they make it while they can. 

6 March 2020
Cersai Lannister wrote:

For Porsche, its customers and dealers there is a reason why this car exists the way it does. Sure, one can strip it back to get more speed with less but most 911 buyers don't want it that way and for those that do there are the GT/RS types of product. We can sneer at its speed but why?, its Porsche's pinnacle of the ultimate compromise of comfort and road car performance. There are other ways to go faster and in more comfort but the 911 Turbo's brief was to do both in a bulletproof fashion. Let's be happy they make it while they can. 

I agree.

Some people are up in arms about the new turbo S being faster than the previous mode, but no one bats an eyelid about the likes of even faster McLaren 720S, with over 700hp (in reality it's actually closer to 800hp). A case of double standards, I'd say.

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