'Encouraging' January UK car sales data marked by dramatic contrasts between some premium brands
5 February 2019

A number of premium car makers saw big drops in new car registrations in January, according to data from the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders (SMMT).

Audi and Porsche suffered notable losses compared with the same period last year, recording falls of 27% and 42% respectively. Those figures contrasted with a significant year-on-year increase of nearly 80% for Volvo, boosted by the launch of the new XC40.

Jaguar Land Rover's well-publicised sales decreases seem to be slowing (in the UK at least), with Jaguar recording a 2.4% drop and Land Rover a 1% drop

Overall, the UK car market dipped by 1.6% over January 2018, with just over 161,000 cars registered. SMMT boss Mike Hawes called the figures "encouraging", but acknowledged it was still the fifth consecutive month of decline for the UK. 

"To restore momentum, we need supportive policies, not least on vehicle taxation, to encourage buyers to invest in new, cleaner vehicles that best suit their driving needs – from the latest petrols and diesels to an ever growing range of exciting electrified vehicles" Hawes continued.

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A continuing trend is the decline in market interest in diesels, with registrations down 20.1%, while petrol-powered models registered a 7.3% increase. Alternatively-fuelled vehicles (such as hybrids and battery electric models) continued to see strong growth, up 26.3% year-on-year.

There was also a marked decline in business registrations, down 33.5%, offset slightly by buyers returning to dealers as private sales grew 2.9%. 

Read more

UK car registrations fall 6.8% in 2018, plus best-sellers revealed

Winners and losers in the 2018 new car market

European diesel sales fell sharply in 2018

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Comments
35

5 February 2019

Could Porsche be in for a tough year now they have killed off diesel? Cayenne, Macan and even Panamera were born to be diesel.

As far as Audi goes my wife will not be returning to the brand when her TT diesel roadstar is up for change this year. She is a high mileage user and will only consider diesel. Audi have killed off the TT diesel so she will be going elsewhere. A shame as she is on her second TT and loves it.

5 February 2019
abz2 wrote:

Could Porsche be in for a tough year now they have killed off diesel? Cayenne, Macan and even Panamera were born to be diesel.

As far as Audi goes my wife will not be returning to the brand when her TT diesel roadstar is up for change this year. She is a high mileage user and will only consider diesel. Audi have killed off the TT diesel so she will be going elsewhere. A shame as she is on her second TT and loves it.

 

I agree, I think the anti-diesel hype has been overdone. I suspect many of the manufacturers who have scrapped their diesel models will find that the potential buyers will just not buy at all. Large luxry cars and indeed any high milleage car is still best suited to being a diesel. No matter what the official stats say about petrol cars, their fuel economy is no match for a diesel.

5 February 2019
abz2 wrote:

Could Porsche be in for a tough year now they have killed off diesel? Cayenne, Macan and even Panamera were born to be diesel.

As far as Audi goes my wife will not be returning to the brand when her TT diesel roadstar is up for change this year. She is a high mileage user and will only consider diesel. Audi have killed off the TT diesel so she will be going elsewhere. A shame as she is on her second TT and loves it.

Shame that, I hadn’t realised they’d killed off the diesel TT. Seemed to be quite popular as well.

A few other manufacturers appear to be following suit. I’m shortly handing back my diese Fabia but due to the distances I cover and mileage I do, I’m looking to move up into a used diesel auto. Hoping it’ll be my last diesel - and that EV provision will significantly improve over the next couple of years, especially for those without off-Street parking. Surely a mechanism of a wire going down a trench and out onto the road isn’t too much to ask of local councils...

Until then, diesel is my best bet - even with the 10p/litre difference. 


"Work hard and be nice to people"

289

5 February 2019

Personally I will be glad to see the back of any diesel.....especially so called 'sports cars' with a diesel engine...what a contradiction in terms that is. I cant imagine what a diesel cabriolet is like with that awful stench of mares piss wafting out of the exhaust!

5 February 2019
289 wrote:

Personally I will be glad to see the back of any diesel.....especially so called 'sports cars' with a diesel engine...what a contradiction in terms that is. I cant imagine what a diesel cabriolet is like with that awful stench of mares piss wafting out of the exhaust!

...and you don't get much sportier than that.

5 February 2019
289 wrote:

Personally I will be glad to see the back of any diesel.....especially so called 'sports cars' with a diesel engine...what a contradiction in terms that is. I cant imagine what a diesel cabriolet is like with that awful stench of mares piss wafting out of the exhaust!

+1

289

5 February 2019

...fifth consecutive month of decline and that momentum needs to be restored.....I dont agree.

Absolute numbers arent necessarily healthy for the industry.

The registration numbers for years have been entirely manufactured with ludicrously cheap pcp's and excessive pre-reg. Perhaps this is a good time for a bit of realism and for manufacturers to prune their ranges, as the demand simply isnt there  ( and never was) for the quantity and breadth of models they are producing. This is not a sustainable model of business.

It is also dangerous to read too much into the so called 'flop' in Audi sales.....WLTP still needs to shake out before we can see a true picture. Volvo has a comparatively small range plus a new model (XC40) currently in demand....no doubt enhanced  as well by delivery delays for VW Group product.

5 February 2019

It's Brexit what is to blame.

I say my bit, then go. So although I'm interested in what you may initially say, I don't care what you think about what I've written, so I won't read whatever your reply is.

5 February 2019

Just a reminder to all those who passed a comment on my diesel predictions some while back, in which I said that by the end of 2021, diesel car sales would be zero.  To bolster my prediction, I simply pointed out (to all thos regular contributors on here who said I was talking nonsense) that the mathematics indicated it by looking at the sales fall per month.  I see that has actually increased, and we may see diesel sales at zero by the summer of 2021.  However, I'll still say December 2021.  As I said at the time (to those berating my comment) that the demand may be above zero, but manufacturers simply won't be offering any diesel cars by then.

I say my bit, then go. So although I'm interested in what you may initially say, I don't care what you think about what I've written, so I won't read whatever your reply is.

5 February 2019
That bloke wrote:

Just a reminder to all those who passed a comment on my diesel predictions some while back, in which I said that by the end of 2021, diesel car sales would be zero.  To bolster my prediction, I simply pointed out (to all thos regular contributors on here who said I was talking nonsense) that the mathematics indicated it by looking at the sales fall per month.  I see that has actually increased, and we may see diesel sales at zero by the summer of 2021.  However, I'll still say December 2021.  As I said at the time (to those berating my comment) that the demand may be above zero, but manufacturers simply won't be offering any diesel cars by then.

If manufactures are not offering diesel cars by 2021, then they will be sacrificing huge sales volume. Anyone needing a diesel will hang on to an older one.  Nobody really needs a new car. All modern cars, excpet for the ocasional lemon can easily last 10 to 15 years and cover 200k miles. Electric cars and charging infrastructure will not be a suitable replacemnet for higher milleage driver for at least a decade in my opinion.

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