Currently reading: Skoda vRS models under threat
The future of Skoda's fast car strategy is under question as new boss Bernhard Maier looks for a viable business case for the vRS sub-brand
Jim Holder
News
2 mins read
4 October 2016

Skoda's fast car strategy is under review, as new boss Bernhard Maier seeks to establish how far he can stretch the brand’s appeal and whether he can make top-end vRS models sufficiently profitable to justify the development costs.

At present, the Octavia vRS is the only top-end fast model in Skoda’s line-up. Instead, Skoda has focused on developing its Monte Carlo, Laurent & Klement and Sportsline styling packs, which have proved both profitable and popular with buyers.

“Theoretically, there are no barriers to any kinds of derivatives, but it is a question of demand,” said Maier. “We have had a wonderful experience with trim upgrades, so I expect to do them again.”

Asked about the recently launched Kodiaq, he added: “I can say now that it will have many emotional directions and we will leverage it in every way possible so as to leave as few people as possible out.”

Although more powerful Kodiaq models than the current 187bhp four-cylinder diesel are expected, there’s no clear indication of whether a vRS derivative will be made. Similarly, despite a Superb vRS model being mooted — with speculation that it and a Kodiaq vRS could be powered by the 296bhp powertrain from the Volkswagen Golf R — there is no certainty that this will happen.

Insiders suggest the Superb and Kodiaq remain the most likely models to get vRS variants, because their size means buyers are more willing to pay a premium. However, other reports suggest that Maier is eager to focus R&D money on hybrid and electric powertrain solutions rather than projects that add little sales volume or profit.

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AndyRAC 9 October 2016

Are Skoda losing the plot??

I had a Mk1 Fabia vRS Special Edition in blue - a fabulous little car; quick-ish, loads of torque, and a good MPG; which did a lot for Skoda's image - and was excellent value for money.

When the 2nd edition was petrol only I felt Skoda had forgotten why the previous version was popular; not only that, but it was hardly the value for money the first edition was.

Sadly, I don't think current Skodas are the value for money they once were; their German owners VW have seen the ££££££££ and the prices have risen.

When getting my Fabia serviced a year or 2 ago i was asked whether I would be interested in a new Fabia; I'm afraid not; no vRS not interested. Another manufacturer has had my custom since.

robhardyuk 8 October 2016

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Bullshit, people who buy Skodas cannot stretch to VW products, and GTD models are out their reach. Alas they whinge about them, or moan about their driving standards. Dull dull dull. If VRS dies, Skoda will somehow be even more boring as a brand! Fabia, Yeti, Octavia, Superb - zzz.
Citytiger 9 October 2016

robhardyuk wrote:

robhardyuk wrote:

Bullshit, people who buy Skodas cannot stretch to VW products, and GTD models are out their reach. Alas they whinge about them, or moan about their driving standards. Dull dull dull. If VRS dies, Skoda will somehow be even more boring as a brand! Fabia, Yeti, Octavia, Superb - zzz.

Sounds like the words of an annoyed GTD owner who now realises he was seriously ripped off, but he has a VW and all that extra money he forked out for a badge was so worth it.. ;)

oaffie 7 October 2016

The real meaning

What he actually meant to say was that the vRS models are taking away too many sales from the Golf GTI/GTD so they must stop selling them.