New scheme being trialled would enable drivers to earn money for reporting potholes and heavy traffic
Felix Page Autocar writer
29 April 2019

A new scheme being developed by Jaguar Land Rover (JLR) could allow drivers to earn money for reporting their journeys. 

Using ‘smart wallet’ technology, drivers would submit updates about traffic conditions and potholes to earn cryptocurrency, which could be used to pay for coffee, tolls and charging and parking fees. 

The ‘distributed ledger’ technology is being developed at JLR’s Shannon-based software engineering centre in Ireland, in partnership with communications developer IOTA. 

The company has not given a date for introducing the technology to customer vehicles, but it is being trialled with a fleet of Jaguar F-Pace and Range Rover Velar test vehicles that have been equipped with the smart wallet functionality.

JLR predicts that 75 billion devices will be connected to IOTA’s network by 2025 and that transactions will become faster because of the absence of processing fees. 

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Jaguar and Land Rover drivers will also be able to top up their virtual wallet by more conventional means. 

This new scheme marks another step towards the firm’s ambition of achieving "zero emissions, zero accidents and zero congestion", by allowing vehicles to play a part in the data-gathering process. 

By enabling drivers to alert others to heavy traffic and poor road surfaces, JLR says, the new technology could encourage freer-flowing traffic, thereby reducing overall tailpipe emissions. 

Russell Vickers, JLR software architect, said: “In the future, an autonomous car could drive itself to a charging station, recharge and pay, while its owner could choose to participate in the sharing economy.”

JLR recently unveiled plans to develop a system that will project a vehicle’s direction of travel onto the road ahead, while an initiative detailed late last year could soon equip JLR models with software that helps them to avoid red traffic lights. 

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Comments
6

29 April 2019

And who pays for all those coffees, tolls and car parking fees? The headline should read, JLR plans to squeeze even more money from drivers.

29 April 2019

So you don't want to be alerted to heavy traffic ahead leading to less emissions etc.  I think it's more a case of you not liking JLR than an OPTIONAL service being provided.

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

29 April 2019
xxxx wrote:

So you don't want to be alerted to heavy traffic ahead leading to less emissions etc.  I think it's more a case of you not liking JLR than an OPTIONAL service being provided.

Yet again someone ignornat (or deaf?) to what's being said.

It's nothing to do with not liking JLR but everything to do about being mislead. For any such system to exist there will be a cost - yes you may get a voucher for a free coffee but you'll have to either pay upfront or what's more likely, it will exist as a subscription service. It's all about misleading headlines and NOTHING to do with not liking a company. What's the phrase - rob Peter to pay Paul? Suggesting that JLR are going to pay their customers - honestly.

Even if someone were dumb enough to believe the headline:

1: Emissions? I thought by 2025 JLR were supposed to concentrating on EV?

2: Perhaps JLR are lagging behind on the tech front because the sat nav in my present car (and the car before it) already warns me of heavy traffic. I'd suggest most folk on here at sometime have experienced their sat nav re-route them.

 

29 April 2019
scotty5 wrote:

xxxx wrote:

So you don't want to be alerted to heavy traffic ahead leading to less emissions etc.  I think it's more a case of you not liking JLR than an OPTIONAL service being provided.

Yet again someone ignornat (or deaf?) to what's being said.

It's nothing to do with not liking JLR but everything to do about being mislead. For any such system to exist there will be a cost - yes you may get a voucher for a free coffee but you'll have to either pay upfront or what's more likely, it will exist as a subscription service. It's all about misleading headlines and NOTHING to do with not liking a company. What's the phrase - rob Peter to pay Paul? Suggesting that JLR are going to pay their customers - honestly.

Even if someone were dumb enough to believe the headline:

1: Emissions? I thought by 2025 JLR were supposed to concentrating on EV?

2: Perhaps JLR are lagging behind on the tech front because the sat nav in my present car (and the car before it) already warns me of heavy traffic. I'd suggest most folk on here at sometime have experienced their sat nav re-route them.

 

Sorry, scotty, still don't get it. This isn't about earning money specifically, its about speeding up automotive-related payments. I know you didn't read the article so I can't blame you.

And I don't really know what you're trying to say about subscriptions. It will be an option on the car, or maybe standard in coming years. Its like saying you would pay a subscription for your car's optional eletrically deploying towbar.

Please read the article before you post

JMax

29 April 2019

Range Rovers already avoid red lights


29 April 2019

With GPS for vehicle speeds and locations (eg google traffic), pot hole cameras for suspension (already in Mercedes Benz), and adaptive suspension (using feedback that can tell you the road surface) all this info should be collected automatically rather than distracted drivers trying to press buttons on an interface (like Waze)..... It's 2019 not 2009.....  Come on Autocar, at least add some comments to your press releases you copy and paste!

 

 

 

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