Currently reading: Health group calls for radical speed bump redesign
Speed bumps linked to 25,000 deaths a year caused by pollution
Jimi Beckwith
News
2 mins read
1 December 2016

Speed bumps in their current guise could be abolished after a health group linked the traffic calming measures to 25,000 deaths a year caused by pollution as a result of frequent acceleration and deceleration.

Read our thoughts on traffic calming measures and the worst-affected cars by potholes

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE), is calling for a redesign of the current speed bump, to ensure vehicles do not need to sharply decelerate and then accelerate, in order to cut air pollution in urban and residential areas.

NICE placed a large emphasis on the importance of driving smoothly to reduce air pollution in its report and targeted buses and lorries with the greatest need to avoid these sharp accelerations and decelerations.

As an alternative to existing traffic calming measures and speed enforcement measures on major roads, an extension of variable speed limits has also been recommended by NICE to “promote a smoother driving style”, much like the ones seen on the ever-growing ‘smart motorway’ network in the UK.

The group further advised reducing the amount of time drivers are allowed to spend with their engines idling by restricting it in certain places, such as outside schools. NICE claims the air pollution caused by this affects children and the elderly more than it affects others. A wider use of 20mph limits in residential areas is on NICE’s list of recommendations, too.

Read about motorway reforms here, and the public's reaction to them here

Paul Lincoln, chief executive of UK health forum and NICE guideline committee chair said: “Traffic-related air pollution is a major risk to the public's health and contributes to health inequalities.

“The NICE guidance sets out a strategic range of evidence-based practical measures to encourage low or zero emissions transport. This is very timely given the imperative to meet EU and national air quality standards.” 

In addition to this, NICE has also observed the impact of the reduction of the speed limit on motorways to 50mph and considered the extra resources needed to enforce this. It described the impact as “highly cost effective at reducing air pollution”.

NICE’s list of recommendations is up for public consultation until the end of January 2017.

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Comments
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Peter Cavellini 3 December 2016

Answers on a ..............?

To be quite honest,there's no such thing as traffic calming,no authority has come up with a fool proof solution to speeding in sensitive areas,plus,putting Cushions(well, that's what they call them here!)just damage your Tyres and steering,they get slippy when it's wet or frosty,i remember when they first started,we would have a Policeman there to make sure we all behaved,but then the Police complained it was a waste of there time,then we had traffic wardens,yep,pretty inaffectual!,so,if anyone has the solution....answers on a......?
Gojohnygo 1 December 2016

London sets the pace

Driving to my business in Manchester today, listening to the report on the radio on car pollution, my average speed was 9.8 mph for 21 miles, not good. this is normal.When we visit my children in London, none who have a car, everybody uses public transport.Cars will eventually make themselves redundent in major conurbations due to the forthcoming grid lock.Planners and car manufactures will need to work together to find a solution, which both keeps the freedom car ownership brings but finds a transport solution for the next 50 years, radical thinging will be required.
5wheels 1 December 2016

Tech is available

In F1 the pit crew bosses and guru's can do all sorts of things to their toys hurtling round at 200mph and one of those is to control the engine. So why on earth cant we have that tech brought to the high street when cars will be unable to exceed the speed limit by using this tech. ??? so simple really
Marc 1 December 2016

5wheels wrote:

5wheels wrote:

In F1 the pit crew bosses and guru's can do all sorts of things to their toys hurtling round at 200mph and one of those is to control the engine. So why on earth cant we have that tech brought to the high street when cars will be unable to exceed the speed limit by using this tech. ??? so simple really

We could, it was tested years ago by the Motor Industry Research Association (MIRA). Politically, it would be suicidal, so it's not likely to happen for sometime.