BP forecourts will get 400 Ultracharge 150 units by 2021, each giving 100 miles of range in 10 minutes
15 August 2019

BP Chargemaster, the UK’s largest electric car charge point provider, has switched on the first of its new Ultracharge 150kW EV chargers at a London fuel station.

Two charging points are now in operation at BP's Cranford fuel station near London Heathrow airport - the first in a planned roll-out of 400 ultra-fast charging points by 2021, which include 100 units at 50 sites by the end of 2019.

Unveiled in June at Silverstone, the new Ultracharge 150 is the first such unit to be built in the UK and will allow EVs to charge at their maximum rated speed.

It is claimed the charger will deliver around 100 miles of range in 10 minutes, which approaches the 75 miles per five minutes offered by Tesla's third-generation Supercharger, revealed in March. The Californian maker's new unit is capable of splitting 1MW of power between four cars, for a 250kW charging rate per car. 

The new Ultracharger 150 features both CCS and Chademo connectors, making it compatible with the majority of EVs on UK roads. Customers can either subscribe to the service for regular use, or pay by the hour. 

The chargers will be part of the Polar network, which is made up of more than 6500 public charging points across the UK.

The roll-out will help future-proof the UK’s charging network, as currently very few EVs are capable of charging at 150kW. Audi’s E-tron is one such EV and its 95kWh battery can be charged to 80% in around 30 minutes. 

Tufan Erginbilgic – CEO of BP’s product and service-led arm, Downstream – said: "As the world of mobility evolves, BP is determined to be the fuel provider of choice whether drivers need electric charging or liquid fuels.

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"BP Chargemaster continues to develop and is leading the way for our understanding of how we can best support and succeed in this fast-growing new market."

The current network of ‘rapid’ chargers are mostly capable of a 50kW charge rate, while Tesla’s current Superchargers are capable of charging at up to 120kW. 

Companies such as Pod Point, Fastned and Ionity all claim to be rolling out chargers capable of supplying power at 150kW and above, but there’s currently only a handful that are operational in the UK. BP Chargemaster’s announcement is the biggest commitment so far. 

The development of the UK’s charging infrastructure is seen as one of the most crucial factors to enable the UK to meet climate change targets, including its promise to end the sale of conventional petrol and diesel cars by 2040. 

In 2018, London-based Pod Point announced it would be installing the UK's first 150kW chargers, claiming that its intelligent smart-charging technology would be able to cope with high levels of demand without placing too much strain on the electricity supply. So far, however, it appears that Pod Point is yet to install and open one of these chargers.

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Comments
36

8 May 2019

So it can share a million watts between just 4 cars in california, what happened to the 350KW/h chargers? more pie-in-the-sky nonsense to fool the potential punter. It will just power blast the battery and will likely shorten it's life a small bit but who really cares. This fast charging business will only really work where the supply voltage is in the kilovolts (KV) otherwise the current required will be "epic" and so will the heat so don't expect this "round your gaff" anytime soon.

289

8 May 2019

Nope.....still not doing it for me

9 May 2019

350KW/h chargers are on their way.  Nothing happens overnight, it took them decades to get petrol stations all over the place.  And you don't need a supercharger at home, just somehting to charge overnight at cheap rates.

www.drivingelectric.com/news/1039/fastned-opens-first-350kw-rapid-charger-uk

9 May 2019
Rtfazeberdee wrote:

350KW/h chargers are on their way.  Nothing happens overnight, it took them decades to get petrol stations all over the place.  And you don't need a supercharger at home, just somehting to charge overnight at cheap rates.

www.drivingelectric.com/news/1039/fastned-opens-first-350kw-rapid-charger-uk

Ionty plus others have been installing 350Kwh capable chargers since 2018 in Europe.  But because of high charging prices most people will still use their home electricity for the first 150 miles, with maybe 4 minute top-ups at 300Khw rate just to get them home in unforeseen circumstances 

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

15 August 2019
405line wrote:

So it can share a million watts between just 4 cars in california, what happened to the 350KW/h chargers? more pie-in-the-sky nonsense to fool the potential punter. It will just power blast the battery and will likely shorten it's life a small bit but who really cares. This fast charging business will only really work where the supply voltage is in the kilovolts (KV) otherwise the current required will be "epic" and so will the heat so don't expect this "round your gaff" anytime soon.

 

You blast the lack of very high power chargers, then immediately ctiticise them for the alleged damage they might do, are you a major league fool, or merely an average sized fool?.

16 August 2019

I'll leave it to you to be the expert..have you got anything to add to the conversation? the point I was making is that there is going to be a monumental power requirerment if a million watts will feed just 4 cars, we've seen the strain on the electrical system recently in the UK as well as the damage it is going to do to the lithium batteries themselves.

8 May 2019

Moving to electric cars will help ease our environment problems a bit and thats a good thing, but its not going to help that much, what we need to focus on if we want to REALLY stop climate change is drastically reducing our consumption of meat, something 90% of people wouldnt ever consider, which means that ourselves and the rest of life on the planet is f*cked. Still at least the meat eaters enjoyed eating their meat, thats the most important thing, after all.

XXXX just went POP.

11 June 2019
typos1 wrote:

Moving to electric cars will help ease our environment problems a bit and thats a good thing, but its not going to help that much, what we need to focus on if we want to REALLY stop climate change is drastically reducing our consumption of meat, something 90% of people wouldnt ever consider, which means that ourselves and the rest of life on the planet is f*cked. Still at least the meat eaters enjoyed eating their meat, thats the most important thing, after all.

Your post makes me want a nice greasy bacon and sausage sandwich and a drive in a supercharged V8 - thanks.. 

However until the world is completely reliant on renewable energy ( no time soon) the rise in electrical consumption and mining rare minerals for EVs will add to our environmental problems, still at least veggies can continue to speak bollocks. Oh and why do veggies insist on having things that look like meat, taste similar to meat, but are not meat, if you want to eat veg at least make it look and taste like veg. 

15 August 2019
Citytiger wrote:

typos1 wrote:

Moving to electric cars will help ease our environment problems a bit and thats a good thing, but its not going to help that much, what we need to focus on if we want to REALLY stop climate change is drastically reducing our consumption of meat, something 90% of people wouldnt ever consider, which means that ourselves and the rest of life on the planet is f*cked. Still at least the meat eaters enjoyed eating their meat, thats the most important thing, after all.

However until the world is completely reliant on renewable energy 

Where do you think all the energy we have ever used and will ever use is coming from?

8 May 2019

Who wants to sit and charge on a petrol station forecourt?!

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