UK-developed device can recharge 99% of electric vehicles stranded at the roadside
Felix Page Autocar writer
30 April 2019

The RAC has launched a new emergency charger for drivers of electric vehicles stranded at the roadside.  

Called EV Boost, the EV recovery device has been installed on six of the breakdown service’s Ford Transit Custom patrol vans ahead of a large-scale roll-out over the coming years. 

As with the RAC’s Fuel Assist service, customers with an EV that’s run out of charge will receive a top-up boost, allowing them to progress to the nearest charging point. 

The EV Boost system is powered by an electrical generator mated to the patrol van’s 1.9-litre diesel engine, and sends charge through an inverter to the power unit in the stranded EV. The RAC says the charging device is compatible with all Type 1 and 2 connections, accounting for the vast majority of EVs on UK roads. 

It has been developed by the RAC in partnership with Original Ltd, a Shrewsbury-based automotive engineering firm. The initiative is the first of its kind in the UK, and highlights the need for recovery services to adapt to growing demand for electric vehicles.

Broken-down EVs usually have to be transported by flatbed truck, which makes recovery a slower, more expensive process. With its new charging device, the RAC aims to restart stranded EVs as quickly as possible, in order to minimise traffic disruption. 

Chris Millward, head of roadside rescue at the RAC, said: “With nothing like it on the market, the real challenge was to develop a mobile EV-charger system which is compact and light enough to fit into our normal patrol vehicles.” 

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Alongside the portable charging scheme, the RAC has unveiled a new Isuzu D-Max heavy-duty patrol vehicle.

Equipped with a 1.9-litre diesel engine, a 2.8-tonne towing capacity and four-wheel drive, the RAC says the 50 new vehicles will be able to recover “up to 90% of passenger cars and light commercial vehicles”. 

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Comments
9

30 April 2019

 So, the RAC have got there first, that’s great, but, how much emergency boost?, how far does it take you?

Peter Cavellini.

30 April 2019

I assume that there is an on board petrol or diesel generator to provide the necessary charge?  Or do the RAC Rescue vehicles have a big heavy battery to do the job, which will itself have to be charged at some point?

If it's the former, it would be somewhat ironic that the good old IC engine comes to the rescue of today's high tech clean machines!  

30 April 2019

And just how do you think the ICE car started in the first placem, good old lead 12v battery!

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

30 April 2019
xxxx wrote:

And just how do you think the ICE car started in the first placem, good old lead 12v battery!

Thats kind of pushing it. Please think about what you write.

This is a great way to beat the charging network problem, and a brilliant advertisement for EVs, seeing them being carged at the side of the road by IC cars. This is one of the most ironic things i've read for a while.

JMax

30 April 2019
JMax18 wrote:

xxxx wrote:

And just how do you think the ICE car started in the first placem, good old lead 12v battery!

Thats kind of pushing it. Please think about what you write.

This is a great way to beat the charging network problem, and a brilliant advertisement for EVs, seeing them being carged at the side of the road by IC cars. This is one of the most ironic things i've read for a while.

Kind of of tongue in cheek. As to your point about BEVs being charged in lay by's etc. being the most ironic thing you've read, well I think you need to read a bit more.

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

30 April 2019

Too late for me.  Not only is the RAC a rotten organisation that I won't use (try phoning them, you will see what I mean - seriously, do it) my EV goes back tomorrow, five months early on the lease.  I couldn't stand the pathetic charging structure anymore.  I've gone back to petrol.

30 April 2019

And not for the first time the reality and the hype are at odds.

30 April 2019

And not for the first time the reality and the hype are at odds.

30 April 2019
Just tow the customer it will be a great deal quicker and most (I guess all) recovery vehicles can already do it.

An electric recovery vehicle would be a good upgrade.

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