Electric car firm says new V3 Supercharger system will cut Model 3 charge times in half

Tesla has unveiled a new third-generation version of its Supercharger system, which, it says, will allow a Model 3 to recover 75 miles of charge in five minutes – and charge at rates of up to 1000 miles per hour.

The electric car firm’s V3 Supercharger system is built on an entirely new architecture, with a 1MW power cabinet that can charge at up to 250kW per car. Tesla estimates the increase in charging speed will cut the amount of time customers spend charging their cars in half.

Tesla has also developed a new feature to help reduce charging times for Model 3 owners. Called On-Route Battery Charging, the system begins to heat the batteries when navigating to a Supercharger station, to ensure they are at optimal charging temperature on arrival.

Through that system and the V3 Superchargers, Tesla estimates that a typical charging time at one of the units will drop to 15 minutes.

The V3 charging system will initially be available for only the Model 3. Tesla says software upgrades are due in the near future to increase charging speeds for Model S and Model X machines. The Model Y SUV, due to be revealed next week, will likely also be able to use the system because it shares technical elements with the Model 3 saloon.

The first beta test V3 chargers are currently in operation in California, near Tesla’s headquarters, and work on the first full sites will begin in April. The first V3 Supercharger sites in Europe and Asia are due in the final quarter of the year. 

Tesla currently has more than 12,000 Supercharger sites in North America and says it plans to have coverage for 99% of the European population by the end of the year.

Our Verdict

Tesla Model 3 2018 road test review hero front

Lowest-price, largest-volume Tesla yet has wooed the buying public in the US. Should UK buyers join the queue for a Model 3?

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Comments
25

7 March 2019

As most Model 3 have a range of 200+miles most owners would only use pricey commercial chargers when forced to and even then just enough to get you to your destination. Having said that a 15 minute top-up after a 4 hour drive (you'd probably want a break anyway) is another boost for the BEV evolution.   

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

7 March 2019
xxxx wrote:

As most Model 3 have a range of 200+miles most owners would only use pricey commercial chargers when forced to and even then just enough to get you to your destination. Having said that a 15 minute top-up after a 4 hour drive (you'd probably want a break anyway) is another boost for the BEV evolution.   

Another advertorial from XXXX, a guy whos never driven a Tesla, lol.

XXXX just went POP.

7 March 2019

Is it only Tesla owners who can use Tesla chargers or are they compatible with other makes? If we are to embrace EVs and have a usuable charging system, every EV needs to be able to use every charger. Other industries have addressed this issue - for example to ubiquitous USB port.

7 March 2019
Will86 wrote:

Is it only Tesla owners who can use Tesla chargers or are they compatible with other makes? If we are to embrace EVs and have a usuable charging system, every EV needs to be able to use every charger. Other industries have addressed this issue - for example to ubiquitous USB port.

Indeed, if that egomaniac nutcase Musk really wanted to help the world properly get into electric cars hed make them available to ALL EVs (maybe with the priviso that Teslas have priority).

XXXX just went POP.

7 March 2019

They're in this business like everyone else: to make money and succeed. If their network is vastly more forward-thinking and advanced than the traditional OEMs, it's their competitive advantage. Hats off for their vision, ambition and execution

7 March 2019
Ektor wrote:

They're in this business like everyone else: to make money and succeed. If their network is vastly more forward-thinking and advanced than the traditional OEMs, it's their competitive advantage. Hats off for their vision, ambition and execution

 

I see your point, though it does somewhat fly in the face of the recent tranche of announcements that many auto makers, wholly in competition with one and other, are actively co-operating in the light of good economic sense. Platform sharing, engine sharing, all help to reduce costs that might prevent tech from reaching the market place when it does, or even at all. There are many examples, more recently Daimler & BMW and VW offering open code on the new ID tech that E-GO are seemingly first to take advantage of. To paraphrase, no auto maker is an island and it shows not only economic good sense, but also a level of maturity that enables R&D to advance more quickly for all our benefit.

8 March 2019
Takeitslowly wrote:

Ektor wrote:

They're in this business like everyone else: to make money and succeed. If their network is vastly more forward-thinking and advanced than the traditional OEMs, it's their competitive advantage. Hats off for their vision, ambition and execution

 

I see your point, though it does somewhat fly in the face of the recent tranche of announcements that many auto makers, wholly in competition with one and other, are actively co-operating in the light of good economic sense. Platform sharing, engine sharing, all help to reduce costs that might prevent tech from reaching the market place when it does, or even at all. There are many examples, more recently Daimler & BMW and VW offering open code on the new ID tech that E-GO are seemingly first to take advantage of. To paraphrase, no auto maker is an island and it shows not only economic good sense, but also a level of maturity that enables R&D to advance more quickly for all our benefit.

The majority of OEMs have partnered in order to catch as as much as possible, as they realized just how far behind they were in this field and the massive investments required to do so. That being said, Tesla has shown readiness to show  and share their technology, an this also goes with the chargers.

In any case, the secret is to stay one or two steps ahead of the followers, and they seem to be doing that pretty well.

8 March 2019
Ektor wrote:

Takeitslowly wrote:

Ektor wrote:

They're in this business like everyone else: to make money and succeed. If their network is vastly more forward-thinking and advanced than the traditional OEMs, it's their competitive advantage. Hats off for their vision, ambition and execution

 

I see your point, though it does somewhat fly in the face of the recent tranche of announcements that many auto makers, wholly in competition with one and other, are actively co-operating in the light of good economic sense. Platform sharing, engine sharing, all help to reduce costs that might prevent tech from reaching the market place when it does, or even at all. There are many examples, more recently Daimler & BMW and VW offering open code on the new ID tech that E-GO are seemingly first to take advantage of. To paraphrase, no auto maker is an island and it shows not only economic good sense, but also a level of maturity that enables R&D to advance more quickly for all our benefit.

The majority of OEMs have partnered in order to catch as as much as possible, as they realized just how far behind they were in this field and the massive investments required to do so. That being said, Tesla has shown readiness to show  and share their technology, an this also goes with the chargers.

In any case, the secret is to stay one or two steps ahead of the followers, and they seem to be doing that pretty well.

 

Tesla were as you alluded, many steps ahead for a long period of time and this should have enabled them to become pre-eminent, but...due to Mr Musk and his typical for a genius attitude, the company has suffered quite a few major and very many minor public setbacks and those, just the ones that made it into the public domain. As is always the case in this business, competitors are quick, not only to catch up, but to learn from the mistakes of others and pull ahead. In most cases, when products need to be R&D'd speedily, rolled out just as quickly, at an economically advatageous cost, co-operation is key. Many big players have the scale to flood all the niches with EV's, that Tesla simply cannot manage to do, not withstanding their production target shortfall woes, that meant and still mean that buyers have lost patience with ever lengthening delivery dates and bought from another brand.

It is hoped they survive as an independent, but they will have to up their whole game, in terms of build quality, shorter lead time, after sales service locations and many more gaps in their armoury, lest they become the pioneer and then a footnote in the history of EV's.

8 March 2019
Ektor wrote:

They're in this business like everyone else: to make money and succeed. If their network is vastly more forward-thinking and advanced than the traditional OEMs, it's their competitive advantage. Hats off for their vision, ambition and execution

Who do you think is going to win the "charging standard war" in the long run? Tesla, a single car manufacturer, or the combined league of ALL other European and North American car manufacturers that are using Combined Charging System (CCS)?

 

8 March 2019
Halcyon wrote:

Ektor wrote:

They're in this business like everyone else: to make money and succeed. If their network is vastly more forward-thinking and advanced than the traditional OEMs, it's their competitive advantage. Hats off for their vision, ambition and execution

Who do you think is going to win the "charging standard war" in the long run? Tesla, a single car manufacturer, or the combined league of ALL other European and North American car manufacturers that are using Combined Charging System (CCS)?

Maybe, but this is a very similar case to that of Apple, who had a visionary leader that made disruptive change part of their DNA, and took them from being an anecdotal, niche CE brand to the world's most valuable company (and took down all the major players of the time, namely Sony, Nokia and Motorola).

Jobs is sadly gone and with him Apple has clarly taken a dive, but Musk is very much in form for now, who knows how long he'll push this disruptive change forward, but I for one are quite excited about what they'll do next.

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