Battery development means 350kW charging will soon be in place, dramatically reducing electric vehicles' charging times
Rachel Burgess
26 September 2018

Electric Audi models will be capable of fast charging to 80% in less than 12 minutes from 2020, the company has claimed.

Audi has just revealed its first electric-only model, the E-tron SUV, which is capable of charging to 80% in 30 minutes using the 150kW fast chargers currently being rolled out across Europe.

However, these 150kW chargers, part of the Ionity network that's joint-owned by Audi, BMW, FordMercedes and others, are already capable of 350kW charging and are ready to be upgraded when battery technology develops enough to be capable of using them.

Audi’s third electric model, the E-tron GT, will be its first to have batteries capable of charging at 350kW when it arrives in 2020, senior E-tron product marketing manager Johannes Eckstein confirmed.

Currently, battery technology is not advanced enough to accommodate the electricity flow rate of 350kW charging, but next-generation batteries such as that expected for the E-tron GT will allow for this.

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Range anxiety is a major barrier to electric vehicle uptake, so being able to charge an electric model in around 10 minutes will have a dramatic impact in perception and usability. The average time to refuel and pay for petrol and diesel is seven minutes.

This news tallies with sibling brand Porsche’s claim that its Taycan electric car, which is due to arrive in 2020, will be capable of “adding 400km in roughly 15 minutes” through 350kW charging points.

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Comments
17

26 September 2018

So why would I buy an Audi e-tron in 2019 if faster charging will be available one year (or less)  later?  10 minutes v 30 minutes is a big wait. Dial in the absence of even 150 kw chargers and its becoming a mess. 

26 September 2018

  Good!, by 2020 my Sons Motobility Car will be due to be replaced, maybe an EV will be a possibility?, salons as range improves as well , we might be persuaded.....

Peter Cavellini.

27 September 2018
Where is the electricity intended to come from for all the 350kW charging points? That's suggestion of a huge demand on existing networks within a couple of years. Puzzling me an engineer of 40+ years experience. Also what if the wind isn't blowing!
Electric Engineer

27 September 2018
Electric Engineer wrote:

Where is the electricity intended to come from for all the 350kW charging points? !

The same source as the 100kw or 50kw charger, your kettle/toaster etc  

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

27 September 2018

Hi Electric Engineer

Not sure if this question is rhetorical, but I will put a comment back anyway, :-).  

National grid peaks at around 37GW (Flux capacitor level) [source: http://grid.iamkate.com/ 27/09)] and drops to as little as 22GW at night.  We could therefore (ignoring solar) say that we have several GW spare capacity, our problem is peak capacity which is reached in dailylight hours.  Most people with home charging points will take the opportunity to charge overnight.  Most fuelstations are empty in the daytime as people fill their cars at night or on their way home with most commutes less than 25 miles.

National grid produced a whitepaper about the uptake of this, and they within boundaries do not seem to present this as a problem.

Their are quite a few studies as to how the car can make money and stabilise the grid, for example, you charge your car at work, which could be free, or maybe as little as £2, bearing in mind if the company has invested in solar panels, they may be able to charge several vehichles.  At home, your solar panels can also charge batteries.  When you get home, grid is going to peak, and at that point your car and home batteries can sell to grid (Maybe at £3).  This makes profit for the car which can recharge at work (provided it has enough range left) at work the next day and you can recharge at night the car and house batteries from grid (when cheap rate) and solar (if sunny) the next day.  Rapid charging is something I would only do once or twice a month when doing more than 250 miles in a day.

So yes, there could be problems, but there are some very creative solutions to be implemented out there as well!

27 September 2018

I'm convinced electric cars are a very big part of the future, and do think people are far too hung up on rapid charging, which for most would be used a few times a year as generally every day your car will start with a full 'tank' so most of us will be visiting fuel stations/chargers far less often than we do now.

One (minor) question I do have about rapid charging is how big will the cables be? I used to install LV equipment in large factories, my maths is rusty but 350kW equates to 1600A, for which we used to install cables of 500 sq mm cross sectional area, which weighed several kg per metre. 

27 September 2018
Bob Cat Brian wrote:

One (minor) question I do have about rapid charging is how big will the cables be? I used to install LV equipment in large factories, my maths is rusty but 350kW equates to 1600A, for which we used to install cables of 500 sq mm cross sectional area, which weighed several kg per metre. 

Looking at the 350Kwh chargers that Electrify America use the cables look no differrent from the 50Kwh charger cable, they're at 'filler' level and suspended from above so I don't think it'll be to much of a problem. But like you say most people will rarely use these, afterall who'd buy petrol at £36 a gallon when you can get it elsewhere for £6.

The same logic applies to electricity. When you can get economy 7 for £0.08 or £0.13 (normal rate) a Kilowatt who'd pay a charging station £0.45p, unless in a emegency or course

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

27 September 2018
xxxx wrote:

Bob Cat Brian wrote:

One (minor) question I do have about rapid charging is how big will the cables be? I used to install LV equipment in large factories, my maths is rusty but 350kW equates to 1600A, for which we used to install cables of 500 sq mm cross sectional area, which weighed several kg per metre. 

Looking at the 350Kwh chargers that Electrify America use the cables look no differrent from the 50Kwh charger cable, they're at 'filler' level and suspended from above so I don't think it'll be to much of a problem. But like you say most people will rarely use these, afterall who'd buy petrol at £36 a gallon when you can get it elsewhere for £6.

The same logic applies to electricity. When you can get economy 7 for £0.08 or £0.13 (normal rate) a Kilowatt who'd pay a charging station £0.45p, unless in a emegency or course

The problem with Economy 7 is that the daytime rate is a total rip-off.

XXXX just went POP.

27 September 2018
typos1 wrote:

xxxx wrote:

Bob Cat Brian wrote:

One (minor) question I do have about rapid charging is how big will the cables be? I used to install LV equipment in large factories, my maths is rusty but 350kW equates to 1600A, for which we used to install cables of 500 sq mm cross sectional area, which weighed several kg per metre. 

Looking at the 350Kwh chargers that Electrify America use the cables look no differrent from the 50Kwh charger cable, they're at 'filler' level and suspended from above so I don't think it'll be to much of a problem. But like you say most people will rarely use these, afterall who'd buy petrol at £36 a gallon when you can get it elsewhere for £6.

The same logic applies to electricity. When you can get economy 7 for £0.08 or £0.13 (normal rate) a Kilowatt who'd pay a charging station £0.45p, unless in a emegency or course

The problem with Economy 7 is that the daytime rate is a total rip-off.

If you've got gas heating (like most people) and cooking then you won't be using daytime electricty much compared to the charge you put in your EV overnight.  Just look at EV forums regarding switching once you have an EV (I mentioned this to you before).

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

27 September 2018

About a fifth of the 27.2 million UK households lives in a flat or maisonette, and a millions more live in terraced housing with no private parking bay. Those with a driveway or garage can keep their car topped up, but for the millions that don't 12 minute charging means an EV becomes viable when it was not before.

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