Imitations are proving hard to ignore for some manufacturers
Mark Tisshaw
17 October 2017

Land Rover design boss Gerry McGovern has revealed that the firm is nervous about creating concept cars in case the designs are copied. 

The company famously sued Chinese firm Landwind over its X7 model that echoed the Range Rover Evoque. McGovern said past experiences had made the company think twice about previewing upcoming designs.

History of the Chinese copycat car: picture gallery

“We’re nervous about showing show cars a couple of years out as you can be copied just like that,” McGovern said last week in London at the reveal of the revised Range Rover. He added that there was a need to protect the huge investments that go into the development of new cars, which are anywhere between £500 million and £1 billion, depending on the project. 

Land Rover has not shown as many concepts as other brands in recent years. In 2014, it used the Discovery Vision to preview the new family of Discovery models, including the flagship fifth-generation Discovery itself. 

It also started the process of replacing the Defender with the 2011 DC100 concept, a model that will now have no bearing on the production car due in 2019. A second, more accurate concept version of the Defender would appear unlikely based on McGovern’s comments, backed up by the fact that there was no concept version of the recent Range Rover Velar, the most recent example of an all-new Land Rover model.

The Velar is what McGovern calls a “white space vehicle” – meaning it creates its own segments – and he added that the Range Rover brand had “elasticity”, in that “it can stretch” into creating more white space products. “There is so much equity in the brand,” he said. 

Copycat cars of the Shanghai motor show

Revisions to the Range Rover and Range Rover Sport have included plug-in hybrid technology coming to Jaguar Land Rover for the first time. Range Rover vehicle line director Nick Collins confirmed that the petrol-electric system used was adaptable to other models and now “goes on the bookshelf for the future”. 

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Comments
24

17 October 2017

Land Rover's build quality and design is far from perfect. Other manfacturers can easily build better quality vehicles with better instruction manuals.

18 October 2017

i can only speak as a Discovery Sport owner of two years' standing. It suited us because it has cavernous interior space combined with a relatively small footprint on the road. Economy is pretty good and it's great to drive, unlike the CRV we test drove before getting this car.  The autobox is nothing to write home about but it's no different to most others I've driven. The touch screen arrangements aren't the horror show I've heard of elsewhere. I like the look of the thing which is mercifully free of all the mad creases you see elsewhere.  Nothing's gone wrong or fallen off, unlike my previous (Japanese) car just a week after I bought it. If I wanted to lord it over others, I'd have got a Range Rover.  It was basically a good deal in terms of the price and the product so we bought it as our family car.  Can't speak for any of their other products but that's just my tuppence.

21 October 2017
I'm on my second, bar a couple of minor trim issues and a dab glitch I love it, best family car ever used, and really fits for us. It does go.minor off road, camping and Biking trips as well as carting family and friends. I call it a bit of a labrador, faithful family companion, does everything you want, bit soft but can move if it needs too.

17 October 2017

And you think the Chinese could make better quality and safer cars? I'm sure you'd get on well with the instruction manuals in hilarious Chinglish.

17 October 2017

Chinglish instruction manuals do not mean a bad quality product, it means bad marketing thats all. BTW, the iphone is made in China as are most electronics and many of the components in your car, regardless of where it was assmebled.

17 October 2017

The Chinese started out by copying, as did the Japenese, the Koreans and the Germans and indeed most of the great master painters the world has known did too. The Chinese are copying much less nowdays - the Landwind is a good example - its clearly not a direct copy it just looks quite similar - if theyd wanted to make a direct copy they would have done so (they have many times before). Anyway LR hasnt much to worry about - their designs are pap, theyre all minor variations on the same theme and are very bland and bnoring. As for there being "much equity in the brand" and it being able to "stretch", well I think most of LR's equity has been used up by trying to fill far too many non existent niches at stupid prices and its currently at breaking point . . .

18 October 2017
typos1 wrote:

The Chinese started out by copying, as did the Japenese, the Koreans and the Germans and indeed most of the great master painters the world has known did too. The Chinese are copying much less nowdays - the Landwind is a good example - its clearly not a direct copy it just looks quite similar - if theyd wanted to make a direct copy they would have done so (they have many times before). Anyway LR hasnt much to worry about - their designs are pap, theyre all minor variations on the same theme and are very bland and bnoring. As for there being "much equity in the brand" and it being able to "stretch", well I think most of LR's equity has been used up by trying to fill far too many non existent niches at stupid prices and its currently at breaking point . . .

 

the chink trolls are out in full force!!

18 October 2017

I see the Bernard Manning appreciation society is out in force today...

19 October 2017
typos1 wrote:

The Chinese started out by copying, as did the Japenese, the Koreans and the Germans and indeed most of the great master painters the world has known did too. The Chinese are copying much less nowdays - the Landwind is a good example - its clearly not a direct copy it just looks quite similar - if theyd wanted to make a direct copy they would have done so (they have many times before). Anyway LR hasnt much to worry about - their designs are pap, theyre all minor variations on the same theme and are very bland and bnoring. As for there being "much equity in the brand" and it being able to "stretch", well I think most of LR's equity has been used up by trying to fill far too many non existent niches at stupid prices and its currently at breaking point . . .

Luckily LR's design is still far better than your typing, grammar and (non-)use of inverted commas.  Happily though, my comment is just an observation, not a criticism.  I would imagine, though, that designing a car is considerably more difficult than pressing buttons on a keyboard.  Still, observation is easy, isn't it...

18 October 2017

Creating"more" white space products? Gerry, please spare us and just, for the love of everything holy, sort a decent new defender. One without the fripperies. You know, a car that can actually be used rather than purchased as a trophy. Thanks fellah.

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