Modified Discovery will be hand-built by JLR's Special Vehicle Operations division and features 517bhp V8 engine
Mark Tisshaw
12 September 2017

An extreme off-road version of the Land Rover Discovery is the latest project from Jaguar Land Rover’s fast- expanding Special Vehicle Operations (SVO) division. The new Discovery variant is the first in a series of models that will carry the SVX badge. 

So far, SVO’s work has focused on making high- performance and more luxurious versions of JLR models, badged SVR and SV Autobiography respectively. But with the off-road-focused SVX nameplate, it now has a third product line. 

The Discovery SVX will enter production next year. Its special modifications over the standard fifth-generation Discovery on which it is based will be hand-fitted by SVO’s workers at its bespoke Oxford Road facility in Coventry. 

The external tweaks of the Frankfurt motor show star are understated and belie the off-road technology and prowess under the skin. Snorkels and huge circular spotlights made famous on the likes of old Camel Trophy Land Rovers are out, and in come more subtle design touches, including strips of LED lights on the roof, chunkier off-road tyres and new front and rear bumpers with skid plates. 

Under the skin, suspension modifications include long- travel dampers and revised knuckles. The monocoque body has been raised, as has the all-round air suspension, which makes the SVX’s approach, departure and breakover angles better than a standard Discovery’s. 

Chunky all-terrain 275/55 R20 Goodyear Wrangler tyres are fitted to lightweight forged aluminium alloy wheels. Land Rover claims the tyres’ extra side-wall height and “more aggressive” tread pattern improve grip on mud and performance on soft surfaces. 

Active centre and electronic rear locking differentials are carried over from the standard model and work with the traction control system. One piece of new tech offered on the SVX is a Hydraulic Active Roll Control system that improves body control and wheel articulation for on-road driving. It’s offered alongside Land Rover’s full suite of off-road chassis technology, including the Terrain Response 2 and All-Terrain Progress Control systems. 

The sole engine offered in the Discovery SVX is a 518bhp, 461lb ft version of JLR’s 5.0-litre supercharged petrol V8. This is the first time a V8 has been available in the Mk5 Discovery. It’s hooked up to an eight-speed automatic gearbox with a twin-speed transfer box. The rotary controller for the transmission is replaced
by a new ‘Pistol Shifter’
 to allow more precise
 control of gears
 off road. 

The car features exposed towing eyes, each of which can recover more than six tonnes, and an electric integrated winch mounted at the rear. There’s a new Tectonic Orange paint finish for the exterior, alongside a black grille and roof bars. Inside, there’s special SVX branding and new colour and trim options. 

Land Rover has also made some tweaks to the regular Discovery range. The 296bhp, 295lb ft 2.0-litre four-cylinder Ingenium petrol engine, with CO2 emissions of 222g/km, is now added to the range. 

Inside, there’s a new 12.3in TFT interactive instrument cluster, which is standard 
on HSE and HSE Luxury models. A 10.0in touchscreen to display the InControl Touch Pro infotainment is standard, with 
4G Wi-Fi now being made available lower down the range as standard on SE models. A revised head-up display
is optional, projecting full colour onto the windscreen, including some off-road information. Another option
is an air purification system
 to improve the outside air entering the cabin and passing through the air-con unit. 

Related stories: 

Frankfurt in pictures: Land Rover Discovery SVX

Land Rover Discovery review 

Range Rover Sport SVR review 

Our Verdict

Land Rover Discovery

Is this a triumph of style over substance or is the fifth-gen Discovery the best yet?

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Comments
9

12 September 2017

What, it's even uglier at the back.....?

12 September 2017

The bottle-blonde brigade will love that, LR's core market these days.

12 September 2017
Cobnapint wrote:

What, it's even uglier at the back.....?

Must admit, prior to the '5s' launch, I was dubious about the rear design.  Now though, I love it.  Particularly in darker colours.  In 8 years time, the Disco will still be worth some decent cash, while Audi Q7s, X5/7 and Touregs of similar age will have been confined to the recycle bin.  All in the name of the 'environment', of course.

12 September 2017

So you develop a supposedly hardcore Discovery to tackle the toughest terrain. Most suitable engine? Your most powerful and costly gas-guzzling V8. Snorkel for deep water wading? Don't bother. Stripped-down interior to take the rough and tumble of serious off-road use? Obviously not necessary. The list of truly desirable features for a hardcore off-roader could go on and on. The most extreme feature of this vehicle will be it's price, which I see is not quoted, but I guess will be in six figures. The JLR money-making machine is in rude health.

12 September 2017
TheDriver wrote:

So you develop a supposedly hardcore Discovery to tackle the toughest terrain. Most suitable engine? Your most powerful and costly gas-guzzling V8. Snorkel for deep water wading? Don't bother. Stripped-down interior to take the rough and tumble of serious off-road use? Obviously not necessary. The list of truly desirable features for a hardcore off-roader could go on and on. The most extreme feature of this vehicle will be it's price, which I see is not quoted, but I guess will be in six figures. The JLR money-making machine is in rude health.

Whilst I'm not a fan of the trinkets, there's many changes to this car (active roll bar, revised suspension) which will hopefully be added to more prosaic trim levels in the future.  There's really no need for a snorkel, as the intake can be mounted high enough in the engine bay to keep it clear of the water at maximum wading depth; any deeper than that and the car floats...

And really, if you don't like a V8 you're on the wrong website.

12 September 2017
TheDriver wrote:

So you develop a supposedly hardcore Discovery to tackle the toughest terrain. Most suitable engine? Your most powerful and costly gas-guzzling V8. Snorkel for deep water wading? Don't bother. Stripped-down interior to take the rough and tumble of serious off-road use? Obviously not necessary. The list of truly desirable features for a hardcore off-roader could go on and on. The most extreme feature of this vehicle will be it's price, which I see is not quoted, but I guess will be in six figures. The JLR money-making machine is in rude health.

Whilst I'm not a fan of the trinkets, there's many changes to this car (active roll bar, revised suspension) which will hopefully be added to more prosaic trim levels in the future.  There's really no need for a snorkel, as the intake can be mounted high enough in the engine bay to keep it clear of the water at maximum wading depth; any deeper than that and the car floats...

And really, if you don't like a V8 you're on the wrong website.

12 September 2017
speckyclay wrote:

And really, if you don't like a V8 you're on the wrong website.

​No, this is Autocar - the clue is in the "car" bit - its for people who love cars, which by definition can be powered by engines with different numbers of cylinders, different fuels and even eletric motors, hydrogen fuel cells, no mention of "v8" in the title of the mag. I think its you whos on the wrong website.

XXXX just went POP.

12 September 2017
typos1 wrote:

speckyclay wrote:

And really, if you don't like a V8 you're on the wrong website.

​No, this is Autocar - the clue is in the "car" bit - its for people who love cars, which by definition can be powered by engines with different numbers of cylinders, different fuels and even eletric motors, hydrogen fuel cells, no mention of "v8" in the title of the mag. I think its you whos on the wrong website.

Can I ask, did you have to replace your Tenalady after you wrote that?


13 September 2017
speckyclay wrote:

And really, if you don't like a V8 you're on the wrong website.

Indeed. But a car that's been there, done that - the 70 series Landcruiser, is a good indicatior of what type of V8 should be used. A diesel.

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