Keen to evolve the Toyota Land Cruiser at what appears to be glacial pace, this latest model is close to the last one in dimensions. The wheelbase remains unchanged, while the overall length increases by just 45mm and the width by a mere 10mm. 

This is a car designed for a purpose, although with some failings. The large door mirrors, for example, are easy to clout when you’re off-roading, but most of the time they add to already outstanding all-round visibility.

The rear wiper is upside down - hinging from the top - and only clears a small portion of the screen

The enormous front grille means fellow motorists are unlikely to doubt what’s coming up behind them, It provides a strong identity but is hardly pretty. Hidden within that grille is a ‘Multi-view monitor system’ – a nose-mounted camera that aids exits from junctions. Front and rear parking sensors are standard on all but the entry-level model, and in any case, they’re not as important here as they would be on cars with poorer visibility.

The spare wheel is slung temptingly in plain view below the car, although the tailgate must be open before it can be released.

And that tailgate is side-hinged, which makes loading heavy items very difficult in confined spaces. However, the rear glass lifts conventionally. Running boards along side of car are standard on all models and are surprisingly useful when climbing aboard such a high vehicle.

As mentioned, Toyota has remained faithful to the antediluvian ladder chassis construction method and a live rear axle located by four links. 

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