Were you to base the Nexo’s rating in this section on nothing more than its real-world range, it would likely score much better. We recorded a total test average hydrogen consumption figure of 42mpkg that, combined with the 6.33kg capacity of its three hydrogen tanks, equates to a 266- mile range. That’s significantly more than the Mirai’s test figure (222 miles), if not quite as much as the Clarity (276 miles). Our touring test economy result suggests you could put almost 380 miles between fills when driving more moderately.

The I-Pace we tested last year could manage only 165 miles at test average and 214 miles at touring pace. Even a Tesla Model S would do well to cover as much ground as the Hyundai on a charge: the P90D we tested in 2016 managed a 214-mile test range. You can, of course, charge an EV on your driveway; and hydrogen filling stations remain a rare commodity in the UK. As such, the question of how realistic or easy running a Nexo would be will likely come down to your proximity to a garage where you can fuel it.

Simon Davis

Simon Davis

Road tester
Regardless of its lifetime CO2 efficiency versus that of a battery-electric car, being able to top up the Nexo’s tanks in five minutes is appealing

Although this lack of infrastructure isn’t a fault of Hyundai’s, it’s still one of two principal barriers to the wider adoption of fuel cell electric vehicles, in the UK at least – the other, of course, being the cost of the necessary technology.

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