Currently reading: Buy them before we do: Second-hand picks for 29 November
Honda's CR-Z has plenty of head-turning ability with a nifty look. Cover the usual bases if you want a good one
Autocar
News
4 mins read
29 November 2019

The Honda CR-Z of 2010-13 is a sporty little hybrid that still turns heads. Make that sporty-looking because the 1.5-litre i-VTEC petrol engine and electric motor together muster just 122bhp.

Of course, this would be forgiven were the CR-Z an economy champ but the fact is that in Autocar’s hands it returned no more than 43mpg. But never mind. What the CR-Z lacks in outright pace and economy it makes up for with engaging handling characterised by strong grip and minimal body roll. Just don’t imagine you can let the whole family experience it: it’s a four-seat coupé but the rear cabin is a real squeeze.

The elephant in the room is the nickel-metal hydride battery and how long it has left. It may explain why so many CR-Zs have had multiple owners, keen to move on before the power light goes out. (A new battery costs £1000 plus fitting.)

In truth, hybrid battery exhaustion seems to be a rare thing, which is why we’ve put such concerns to one side in search of a promising CR-Z. We think we may have found it in this 2011/11- reg example with 82,000 miles and full Honda dealer history. Unusually for a CR-Z, it has had just two owners.

The first thing to check is that the battery warning light goes out after start-up. Then, on the test drive, we’ll ensure the three driver modes (Sport, Normal and Econ) work and the speedometer changes colour with our driving style. Back at base, we’ll check the battery charge level has gone up.

After that, it’s the usual stuff: checking the gearshift action, listening for suspension clonks and making sure the 12,500-mile service intervals have been followed.

Subaru Forester XT Turbo, £3200: Even today, few SUVs are faster than the Forester Turbo, which can crack 0-62mph in 5.7sec. We found a 2005/55-reg with 107,000 miles and full service history. “Was always on my list of cars to own,” says the seller. Parting is such sweet sorrow.

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Honda CR-Z

The Honda CR-Z is as intriguing and appealing to drive as hybrids currently get

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Ford Mondeo ST24, £995: Here’s a forever car to savour. The one-owner motor was bought in 1997 and has notched up 132,000 miles. The Mondeo Mk1 was best of breed in its day and the ST24’s 2.5-litre V6 petrol engine was a smooth-revving thing, capable of 0-62mph in 8.0sec.

Renault Laguna GT V6 Auto, £5500: This Laguna packs a detuned version of the 3.5-litre V6 from the Nissan 350Z and can dispatch 0-62mph in 7.4sec. At the time, our reviewer couldn’t find a good reason to buy one but £5500 for this 2009/09-reg with 40k miles seems reason enough now.

Maserati Ghibli 3.0 V6 S, £35,980: The Ghibli plays fourth fiddle to the best execs but has more charisma than all of them, especially in 404bhp twin-turbo 3.0-litre V6 S form. It sounds fantastic and is good for 0-62mph in 5.0sec. Our find is a 2016/65-reg with 20,000 miles.

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Auction watch

Porsche 968 Sport: When is a 968 Club Sport not a Club Sport? When it’s a Sport. The CS-based model came out in 1994 and was sold in the UK only. It was a CS but with some of the standard 968’s creature comforts restored. It proved a hit but, with only 306 ever made, is pretty rare today.

Amazing, then, that one should turn up for sale at auction without a reserve and even more amazing that, given its condition, it should be sold for a modest £9000. The car had done 127,000 miles but had a £5000 engine rebuild by a specialist at 90,000 miles.

Future classic

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BMW i8, £45,000: A BMW plug-in sports car with futuristic looks and stuffed with advanced tech – if this isn’t a future classic, we’ll chew our charging cable. New, it cost around £104,000 but you can pick them up from around £40,000 now. In fact, we found a fully loaded 2014/64-reg with 30,000 miles and mechanical and interior warranties, a three-year service pack and full BMW service history for £45,000. It’s a lot of money and these first i8s are sure to get cheaper but one day the market will cry: “Enough!”

Clash of the classifieds

Brief: Find me a year-old supermini bargain.

Citroën C3 1.2 82 Flair, £8999

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Seat Ibiza 1.0 SE, £8387

Mark Pearson: Of course, a small car should offer all the pleasures a larger car does, just in a smaller package. The Ibiza ticks the boxes by being fun to drive, practical, well equipped and scoring well for safety. This one-year-old car I’ve found is almost half list price, too, and on top of that, the Ibiza’s a pleasure to sit in and to own, which is more than can be said of your fragile Citroën…

Max Adams: I wouldn’t shout too loudly about fragility because your Ibiza isn’t the most reliable of small cars, according to the What Car? Reliability Survey. Anyway, yours is a boggo version, while my newer, 2019 car has an extra 11bhp to play with, a reversing camera and climate control. Plus, it has a quirky style all of its own compared with your identikit VW Group product.

MP: Yes, yours also happens to be rubbish, doesn’t it?

MA: It doesn’t score as highly, no, but when has a car-buying decision purely been a box-ticking exercise? Dare to be a little different, instead.

MP: To be different is all very well, but to do things properly is better. The Ibiza’s a great car, a shrunken Leon, a mini Cupra… We all like a Citroën, but not of that sort…

MA: The sort with squidgy seats and funky details, you mean?

MP: Max, I’ve seen more charm in a tray of soil.

Verdict: I fancy a flutter: the C3 it is.

READ MORE

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Honda to ditch diesel in Europe by 2021 

Updated Honda Civic gets styling and interior tweaks

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Clarkey 29 November 2019

I love mine (just as well

I love mine (just as well since I spend three hours a day commuting in it). Fun to drive and a solid 51mpg.
si73 30 November 2019

Clarkey wrote:

Clarkey wrote:

I love mine (just as well since I spend three hours a day commuting in it). Fun to drive and a solid 51mpg.

Some people get them, others don't. I loved mine but only had it a short while as I used its value to do up my na mx5

xxxx 29 November 2019

Nothing to do with don't like

It's a 1.5 122 hp, a 8 year old Suzuki Swift + others manages to get that without a Turbo or heavy expensive battery+tech.

Wouldn't have one as it offers no real advantage but has major drawbacks

Takeitslowly 29 November 2019

xxxx wrote:

xxxx wrote:

It's a 1.5 122 hp, a 8 year old Suzuki Swift + others manages to get that without a Turbo or heavy expensive battery+tech.

Wouldn't have one as it offers no real advantage but has major drawbacks

 

Compare emmissions/tech, etc...indeed, you continually try and fail to compare the equivalent of apples to pears. What do you drive..am sure we would be delighted to hear where you have put your money/benefits.

FM8 29 November 2019

Takeitslowly wrote:

Takeitslowly wrote:

xxxx wrote:

It's a 1.5 122 hp, a 8 year old Suzuki Swift + others manages to get that without a Turbo or heavy expensive battery+tech.

Wouldn't have one as it offers no real advantage but has major drawbacks

 

Compare emmissions/tech, etc...indeed, you continually try and fail to compare the equivalent of apples to pears. What do you drive..am sure we would be delighted to hear where you have put your money/benefits.

You can bet it's better than your Micra. What do you drive? That was a regular question from the paedo known as FMS...

si73 30 November 2019

xxxx wrote:

xxxx wrote:

It's a 1.5 122 hp, a 8 year old Suzuki Swift + others manages to get that without a Turbo or heavy expensive battery+tech.

Wouldn't have one as it offers no real advantage but has major drawbacks

Offers no real advantage? What's that got to do with buying a car, my na mx5 offers no real advantage over a warm hatch performance or economy wise, the crz is a great looking great to drive little coupe that is quick enough, especially mid range, and provides very good fuel economy. Again the point I was making was that the article makes big noise on a non issue, the battery is not known to fail, the things to worry about are the usual used car buying guide age related stuff, this article implies that the battery is likely to be dead or dying, that simply isn't true, as I have suggested this is proven by the much older civic ima with high mileage and perfectly intact batteries.
Again I understand your dislike, each to their own, but your criticism of the battery, based on this article is unfounded.

xxxx 29 November 2019

Hybrid buyers beware

" keen to move on before the power light goes out. (A new battery costs £1000 plus fitting.)" Going to be a re-occurring theme in future with Hybrids, and how much will the fitting charge be?

si73 29 November 2019

xxxx wrote:

xxxx wrote:

" keen to move on before the power light goes out. (A new battery costs £1000 plus fitting.)" Going to be a re-occurring theme in future with Hybrids, and how much will the fitting charge be?

Go and speak to hybrid specialists or Honda and ask how many ima's have had battery issues or replacement batteries, don't forget the civic hybrid was a late 90s car and it's hybrid is still going strong. Toyota's Prius is similarly long lived. Also I think the price quoted is for the last of the crz's battery which was a more powerful l-ion, the nimhs are more like £600 iirc

xxxx 29 November 2019

si73 wrote:

si73 wrote:
xxxx wrote:

" keen to move on before the power light goes out. (A new battery costs £1000 plus fitting.)" Going to be a re-occurring theme in future with Hybrids, and how much will the fitting charge be?

Go and speak to hybrid specialists or Honda and ask how many ima's have had battery issues or replacement batteries, don't forget the civic hybrid was a late 90s car and it's hybrid is still going strong. Toyota's Prius is similarly long lived. Also I think the price quoted is for the last of the crz's battery which was a more powerful l-ion, the nimhs are more like £600 iirc

Don't need to speak to anyone about battery failure as the info is in the article. And whether the part is £1, 000 or £600 plus fitting it's a potential cost/pit fall you don't really want to have on 8 year old cheap, with average performance, run-a-round that isn't that great on petrol anyway

si73 29 November 2019

xxxx wrote:

xxxx wrote:

si73 wrote:
xxxx wrote:

" keen to move on before the power light goes out. (A new battery costs £1000 plus fitting.)" Going to be a re-occurring theme in future with Hybrids, and how much will the fitting charge be?

Go and speak to hybrid specialists or Honda and ask how many ima's have had battery issues or replacement batteries, don't forget the civic hybrid was a late 90s car and it's hybrid is still going strong. Toyota's Prius is similarly long lived. Also I think the price quoted is for the last of the crz's battery which was a more powerful l-ion, the nimhs are more like £600 iirc

Don't need to speak to anyone about battery failure as the info is in the article. And whether the part is £1, 000 or £600 plus fitting it's a potential cost/pit fall you don't really want to have on 8 year old cheap, with average performance, run-a-round that isn't that great on petrol anyway

Fair enough, I know you dislike them, your choice, the point I am making though is that the article is highlighting a non issue, it's of much less concern than all the emission tech on a modern diesel or the possible failure of a turbo on a modern down sized engine or any other issue with all other used cars.

Takeitslowly 29 November 2019

xxxx wrote:

xxxx wrote:

" keen to move on before the power light goes out. (A new battery costs £1000 plus fitting.)" Going to be a re-occurring theme in future with Hybrids, and how much will the fitting charge be?

 

No need to worry about the cost of a battery, your novelty torch takes AAA size, one of the smallest...much like your brain.

FM8 29 November 2019

Takeitslowly wrote:

Takeitslowly wrote:

xxxx wrote:

" keen to move on before the power light goes out. (A new battery costs £1000 plus fitting.)" Going to be a re-occurring theme in future with Hybrids, and how much will the fitting charge be?

 

No need to worry about the cost of a battery, your novelty torch takes AAA size, one of the smallest...much like your brain.

AAA, isn't that the battery size your mother's 10" dildo takes? Why don't you go and take a look before she shoves up her arse again.

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