High Court has ruled in favour of Land Rover to protect Defender name from Canadian company

Land Rover has prevented a Canadian company from using the name Defender for an all-terrain vehicle which has been marketed as a “fun, recreational off-roader”.

The company, Bombardier Recreational Products, was issued an order from the High Court blocking use of 'Defender' or other similar names, for example ‘Defender Max’, within the EU.

Jaguar Land Rover legal boss Keith Benjamin said: "We welcome this ruling, recognising the enforceability of our intellectual property rights and preventing use by third parties. 

“The Land Rover Defender is an iconic vehicle that is part of Jaguar Land Rover’s past, present and future. The success of our business is based on unique design and engineering attributes, and we intend to protect the brand robustly around the world.”

A spokesman added that the firm would “remain vigilant [on this matter] across more than 150 markets” in which it sells vehicles.

“This is an excellent outcome showing that Jaguar Land Rover will protect its brand resolutely and will pursue legal action wherever necessary, even against large companies: and this protection will include name, body shape and passing off anything similar,” he added.

Bombardier has also been ordered to pay a small amount in damages and legal costs and must remove the Defender badge from all products including brochures. 

The move by Land Rover also means that it is likely to try and prevent chemical firm Ineos, which recently expressed an interest in making a Defender-like model, from launching a vehicle. However, the company claims to have no plans to use the Defender name for its model.

The new Land Rover Defender, which promises to the brand’s most high-tech car yet, is already undergoing testing ahead of going on sale in 2019.

Read more on the upcoming Land Rover Defender

Read our review of the Discovery prototype

 

 

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Land Rover Defender

The Land Rover Defender is an institution and unbeatable off road, if crude on it

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289

14 December 2016
What the f*ck where these crazy Canadians thinking...did they really believe that Land Rover wouldn't robustly protect arguably their strongest identity?
As for Ineos...did they really believe that if Land Rover did decide to let them build the Defender under licence - they would inherit the name too.....!? I mean it beggars belief.
This is either a complete non story or in the case of Ineos the directors are so inept business men that any project like this is doomed to fail.

14 December 2016
289 wrote:

What the f*ck where these crazy Canadians thinking...

They were probably thinking "Land Rover Defender?? What's that?", because outside of the deluded world of Autocar, the supposed 'world's best 4x4' isn't that well known in much of the world, including in North America were sales over the years have been small and sporadic.

15 December 2016
k12479 wrote:
289 wrote:

What the f*ck where these crazy Canadians thinking...

They were probably thinking "Land Rover Defender?? What's that?", because outside of the deluded world of Autocar, the supposed 'world's best 4x4' isn't that well known in much of the world, including in North America were sales over the years have been small and sporadic.

Really, sales might have been small but to say this iconic car isn't well known is complete rubbish, you'll be saying the G wagon is more famous next

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

15 December 2016
xxxx wrote:

...to say this iconic car isn't well known is complete rubbish, you'll be saying the G wagon is more famous next

Land Rover generically may be well-known, but given that the Defender was only sold for a few years in NA in the mid-nineties, and through years of visiting and living there I never saw a single one, I'd say you're wrong. Also given that both the US and Canadian militaries have used G-wagons, their appearance in celebrity culture and the fact that its fairly easy to see one in any major city like NY or Chicago and at every motor show, I'd say you're wrong on the second point too.

15 December 2016
k12479 wrote:
xxxx wrote:

...to say this iconic car isn't well known is complete rubbish, you'll be saying the G wagon is more famous next

Land Rover generically may be well-known, but given that the Defender was only sold for a few years in NA in the mid-nineties, and through years of visiting and living there I never saw a single one, I'd say you're wrong. Also given that both the US and Canadian militaries have used G-wagons, their appearance in celebrity culture and the fact that its fairly easy to see one in any major city like NY or Chicago and at every motor show, I'd say you're wrong on the second point too.

NA isn't the centre of the universe(not even sure where it is) nor are those American cities you mention. The Defender was sold for over 20 years to famers, military (including the US), Medic etc around the world meaning it's an important name and one not to be lost

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

15 December 2016
xxxx wrote:

NA isn't the centre of the universe(not even sure where it is)...The Defender was sold for over 20 years to famers, military (including the US), Medic etc around the world meaning it's an important name and one not to be lost

NA = North America, includes the 2nd biggest car market, incidentally the biggest (China) and the fastest growing (India, Brazil, etc.) aren't too au fait with the Defender either. Yes, the Defender WAS sold to many segments, but lost most of them (unlike the G-wagon which continues) and was perhaps never as globally relevant as those here believe. Btw this ruling only affects the EU, Bombardier can continue using Defender elsewhere.

14 December 2016
"The move by Land Rover also means that Ineos, which has recently expressed an interest in launching a Defender-named model, is unlikely to be able to progress with its plans."

Sorry, Ms Burgess, but I do not comprehend why this puts a spoke in the wheel of the tentative plans Ineos announced some months ago. As I recall, their spokesman was conscious of the fact that they would not be able to use the 'Defender' name. Their business case was/is based on the premise that a model that cited the earlier Land-Rovers for inspiration would be unlikely to infringe any design rights.

14 December 2016
A company with annual sales of $40 billion (just under half the size of Tata) and 17,000 employees is unlikely to have inept directors... They would not be expected to produce a Defender clone - if starting from scratch why not make the improvements JLR never got round to?

15 December 2016
Defender is that important a name anyway

It's a Land Rover, that's the bit that people remember.

15 December 2016
Maybe once brexit is out of the way Ineos will be able to use the Defender name in the EU?

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