Network will switch to kWh-based scheme on 31 January; CEO says it's “on track” to have 400 chargers live by 2021
16 January 2020

Ionity will introduce a new, kWh-based pricing structure at the end of the month across its 200-strong network of electric vehicle (EV) rapid chargers. 

The company, formed as part of a joint venture between BMW, Mercedes-Benz, Ford and the Volkswagen Group, currently operates a ‘pay per vend’ system with a flat fee of £8 per charging session in the UK. As of 31 January, the new system, for customers without contracts, means they will pay €0.79 (69p) per kWh.

Speaking to Autocar, Ionity CEO Michael Hajesch said the new system is “good for the customer, meaning they pay for exactly what they are served with. It’s not mixed with any other details or terms, it’s just easy, transparent good sense”. 

All UK charging networks have been given guidance under the Alternative Fuels Infrastructure Regulations 2017 to offer such a pricing scheme for non-contract users, but Ionity is among the first the adopt the change. 

The system is designed for customers who don't use Ionity’s largely motorway-based network regularly, rather than those who have one of the many Connected Mobility Service Provider (MSP) contracts, such as BMW’s ChargeNow and Volkswagen’s WeCharge. 

Ionity, at two years old and with about 60 staff, currently operates 200 charging stations with more than 860 charging points across 20 European countries, including the UK. Hajesch claims the company intends to have around 40 stations live in the UK by the end of 2020, with 400 Europe-wide. The next site to open in the UK will be at the Skelton Lake Extra motorway services near Leeds. 

Hajesch is keen to point out that the fastest Ionity stations, running 350kW chargers, are “not 350 per site but 350 per charging outlet, so all vehicles get served the same rate at the same time”. 

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He also cites the UK as “one of the most significant markets in Europe for the brand”, regardless of the outcome of Brexit, “considering vehicle registrations and the history of manufacturing and production in the UK”. 

As the UK’s decision to leave the European Union unfolds, Hajesch claims the agility and size of Ionity means it's “watching, listening and evaluating to see if we have to react in some way. If we can just continue as is, even better”. 

Read more: 

Ionity to expand EV fast charger network at Extra motorway services

Analysis: who will charge our electric vehicles? 

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Comments
17

16 January 2020

So Ionity, you've lost a customer. Instead of £8 to charge a Nissan Leaf, it will now cost £27!

You read that right, £27 to travel a maximum of 168 miles, that's over 16pence per mile! I hope this isn't the future of public charging, or the future of the electric car is dead.

Ridiculous exploitation. And to put out a statement stating it's good for the customer, well I'm speechless. I hope bankruptcy awaits them. I will not give them a single penny more.

 

16 January 2020
I don't think you realise, that was the introductory price while they established the network. It's been in their docs for ages that they'd start charging by kWh once it was matured a bit.

I'm sure Polar et al would love your business, plus WHY are you charging a Leaf on Ionity!? Ionity is for cars that accept reasonably fast speeds & don't rapidgate lol.

16 January 2020
Simply because there is one local to where I work.

Approx half this price would be a reasonably competitive rate.

16 January 2020

Shell Recharge costs 39p per kWh

Ecotricity are also at 39p

Tesla charge 24p

PodPoint at Lidl in Manchester (and probably other places as well) 0p

 

 

16 January 2020

About 4-5 times the cost of running a vehicle on petrol.

Will end up like Ecotricity, the last resort emergency charger for people caught short and desperate. Which seems cynical and exploitative. Like putting coin slots on hard shoulder emergency phones.

Perhaps I will get a trailer and put a very big battery on it, I could charge it from my 11p kw/h at home and park next to these chargers and tout a charge for 20p kw/h making a nice profit whilst undercutting them by 49p

16 January 2020
The Apprentice wrote:

About 4-5 times the cost of running a vehicle on petrol.

Will end up like Ecotricity, the last resort emergency charger for people caught short and desperate. Which seems cynical and exploitative. Like putting coin slots on hard shoulder emergency phones.

Perhaps I will get a trailer and put a very big battery on it, I could charge it from my 11p kw/h at home and park next to these chargers and tout a charge for 20p kw/h making a nice profit whilst undercutting them by 49p

Comments such as yours only go to prove that you will never finish your apprenticeship.

17 January 2020
Takeitslowly wrote:
The Apprentice wrote:

About 4-5 times the cost of running a vehicle on petrol.

Will end up like Ecotricity, the last resort emergency charger for people caught short and desperate. Which seems cynical and exploitative. Like putting coin slots on hard shoulder emergency phones.

Perhaps I will get a trailer and put a very big battery on it, I could charge it from my 11p kw/h at home and park next to these chargers and tout a charge for 20p kw/h making a nice profit whilst undercutting them by 49p

Comments such as yours only go to prove that you will never finish your apprenticeship.

Why are you back Takeitslowly? You add nothing to debate, and have a superiority complex that’s bizarre. Hope your nasty little life is deeply unpleasant.

16 January 2020
We recently took one of our two Nissan Leafs to Spain for a couple of months. I did a lot of research beforehand but the network of rapid chargers is not as developed or easy to access, especially in Spain, as compared to the uk. We did manage it but gave ourselves plenty of time so as not to have to rush or overstress ourselves. We did over 3000 miles in total that cost us £120 but this included some free chargers. So long distance in Europe is possible (but not easy) and the networks are being developed rapidly so things should improve quite quickly.

17 January 2020

With my i3 running around 3.3 miles per kWh at the moment, that's an equivalent cost to getting 27 MPG in a petrol car.

I haven't actually used Ionity yet, but they do have a good reputation for dependability and charging speed. This pricing will scupper that - it's twice what anyone else is charging, and nearly six times what I'm paying to charge at home. I know the latest 350kW chargers that Ionity are starting to roll out will be expensive, but a) my car only takes 50kW, and b) the pricing still doesn't make any sense, given that petrol pumps are expensive too, and require a kiosk, and the fuel is taxed vastly more... yet somehow works out cheaper. Something is very wrong.

Ionity's new pricing is so extreme, actually, that it makes me a bit suspicious. It's a unique network in Europe, being run by car manufacturers for whom EVs are not the primary product.

17 January 2020
...you have a home charger, running that electric car just got very expensive. That's put me off them somewhat. So far, one of the big plus points was the cost savings, but if it's going to end up comparable to s petrol car per mile, that will put a lot of buyers off.

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