350kW fast chargers to be installed at eight of Extra's motorway service stations
Felix Page Autocar writer
28 June 2019

EV charging network Ionity, backed by BMW, Daimler, Ford and the VW Group, has partnered with Extra MSA Group to expand its network of fast chargers at motorway service stations across the UK. 

Up to six 350kW fast chargers will be installed at eight Extra’s motorway service areas, starting this year with the company’s £60m Skelton Lake, Leeds facility on the M1 motorway. 

The scheme will later take in Extra's services at Cobham, Cambridge, Beaconsfield, Cullompton, Blackburn, Baldock and Peterborough. 

Ionity says its 350kW fast chargers, first deployed in the UK last month in Kent, are capable of charging vehicles in less than 20 minutes, although no mass production EV is yet capable of charging at this speed. 

Audi’s new E-tron electric SUV is currently the fastest charging EV on the market, at 150kW. The new Porsche Taycan, launching next year, will be the first production electric car capable of a 350kW charge rate. 

The company said: “Due to their 350kW capacity and the strategic positioning of its stations, Ionity's network will make EV travel across the UK and Europe a truly hassle-free experience.”

The network aims to have opened 40 fast charging stations across the UK and 2400 charging points across Europe by the end of 2020.

Recently, Tesla unveiled a new generation of its Supercharger EV charging point, promising charge rates of 1000 miles or range per hour, and 75 miles in five minutes. The highest-speed superchargers will only be compatible with certain versions of the Tesla Model 3

BP Chargemaster, the UK’s biggest provider of EV infrastructure, is planning to install 400 points capable of ultra-fast 150kW charging (the current maximum speed) across the UK by 2021. 

Our Verdict

Audi E-tron 55 Quattro 2019 road test review - hero front

Zero-emissions, all-paw SUV leads Germany’s charge to electrification

Find an Autocar car review

Driven this week

Join the debate

Comments
18

28 June 2019

At last!!!

28 June 2019

 So, more for middle Britain?, are other providers doing Scotland for instance?,and I’m sure others wonder about their part of the Country....!?

28 June 2019

Wow, a whole eight chargers - gamechanger.

 

/s

28 June 2019
So if they put 6 in at each location:

6 x 8 = 48 Chargers

48 x 350 kW = 16.8 MW

So, 5 x 3.6 MW offshore wind turbines operating at max capacity. For only 48 fast chargers.

I see no issue with this road-side fast charging idea at all.

28 June 2019
mdouth258 wrote:

So if they put 6 in at each location: 6 x 8 = 48 Chargers 48 x 350 kW = 16.8 MW So, 5 x 3.6 MW offshore wind turbines operating at max capacity. For only 48 fast chargers. I see no issue with this road-side fast charging idea at all.

Are you saying this single EXPANSION from one company means 48 cars can be charged at a maximum of 350kw at any one time from wind turbines.     Opposed to 48 ICE cars at any time being pumped 100's of litres of processed oil only for that to be turned into NOx, CO2, CO, diesel particles etc and puff'ed out next to the pavement?

28 June 2019
What I was getting at is the infrastructure expansion required for a relatively small gain is alarming. The power you need to be able to fast charge one car is comparable to that consumed by an entire small village. In cities, I get the air quality issue - I recently walked congested London road was unpleasant to say the least - a genuine shock as someone who lives in the Midlands and avoids cities at all costs. In the majority of British towns and villages, I do not believe there is currently an issue with air quality.

Either way, the example I provided holds true - to fast charge 48 cars at 350kW requires the equivalent of 5 off-shore wind turbines going at full chat.

If you believe Mr Musk and his trucks, to support a fully electric infrastructure for both private vehicles and commercial vehicles, you'll need to have a huge number of vehicles fast charging at any given time to avoid queues at charging stations and/or significant delays to deliveries. I'm afraid I struggle to see plug-in electric car charging is the future.

As for 48 cars requiring filling up with juice. Yes, it's a simple isolated system that has grown and evolved to match the steady growth of the ICE, simply comprising big tanks of flammable liquid that can be moved and pumped all across the country as fast or as slow as one sees fit without any impact to the rest of the country flicking the kettle on halfway through Love Island.

Replacing replacing underground fuel tanks with banks of batteries, supercaps or similar requires a significantly higher energy density than what can be achieved at the moment to be anywhere close to viable. So it would have to be generated/bought in to meet demand. I'd be surprised if the EU do us any favours on electricity supply when they are trying to manage their own electric car charging problems. We're on our own here.

I can see in sparsely populated countries with significant surplus power generation plug in vehicle charging is suitable, e.g. Norway. Unfortunately, in my opinion, the UK is a long way off being in a position to support widespread roadside charging.

29 June 2019
mdouth258 wrote:

 to fast charge 48 cars at 350kW requires the equivalent of 5 off-shore wind turbines going at full chat. .

 

At any given instance, I don’t think you’ve done the maths to scale it up:

Lets make some assumptions based around a theoretical Kona/Nero, a ‘middle of the road’ BEV. They have 64kWh batteries and 300miles range.

The 350kW charger could therefore charge 5.4 cars from empty to full in one hour (350/64). So 48 cars becomes 260 cars (48x5.4) per hour, 6221 cars per 24hours. Each car that was now empty now has 300 miles range. That’s a total of 1.8 million miles in one day from your 5 turbines, or each turbine providing 375 000 miles per day. Which is pretty impressive IMO.

28 June 2019

I am overwehelmed by this massive expansion in the EV charging network. Not.

28 June 2019
“The highest-speed superchargers will only be compatible with certain versions of the Tesla Model 3” - Autocar

No Autocar, all Model 3’s will be compatible, as they all share the same battery tech. Model S and X are not compatible yet.

28 June 2019

Actually new Model S & X built since May are CCS compatible via a small adapter included with the car older S&Xs can have be upgraded to work with CCS although they'll peak at a lower current than the 3.

Pages

Add your comment

Log in or register to post comments

Find an Autocar car review

Driven this week