Currently reading: Electrified classic car firm Lunaz reveals two Rolls-Royce EVs
Phantom V and Silver Cloud get ground-up restorations and electric powertrains from Silverstone firm
Felix Page Autocar writer
News
3 mins read
21 August 2020

Classic car electrification firm Lunaz has revealed two new models for its burgeoning line-up of converted historics: zero-emissions versions of the 1961 Rolls-Royce Phantom V and Silver Cloud.

Just 30 build slots will be made available in a selection of bodystyles that include four-door limousine, two-door coupé and drop-head coupé. Prices for a Silver Cloud begin at £350,000 excluding local taxes and an electric Phantom starts at £500,000. According to the company, it has already accepted orders from existing clients.

Each retro-styled EV is visually unmodified and undergoes a coachbuilt restoration process but has its original petrol motor swapped for a secretive, in-house-developed electric powertrain that produces 516lb ft and 375bhp. Lunaz claims a range of more than 250 miles from an 80kWh battery pack and a 0-60mph time of less than five seconds.

“The time is right for an electric Rolls-Royce,” company founder David Lorenz said. “We are answering the need to marry beautiful classic design with the usability, reliability and sustainability of an electric powertrain.

“More than ever, we are meeting demand for clean-air expressions of the most beautiful and luxurious cars in history.”

The Silverstone-based firm already offers electrified versions of the Jaguar XK120 sports coupé, which is set to be delivered to customers towards the end of 2020, the XK120 convertible and its XK140 sibling. The company plans to double the size of its UK workforce to meet demand for the converted restorations.

Lunaz finished testing and development of the electric Jaguars before the UK went into lockdown on 23 March, subsequently taking orders via video consultation with customers. The firm claims its unique business model - supplying only to customers with whom it has a direct existing relationship - has shielded it from the issues that have affected mainstream manufacturers during the pandemic. 

Each car converted by Lunaz is 3D scanned prior to any work being carried out so that engineers can create CAD renders to “ensure technical perfection”. The car is then stripped down ahead of a full restoration, with all coachbuilding and trimming work carried out by the firm's own engineers. Interiors are subtly modernised with upgraded sound systems, infotainment systems and wi-fi functionality. Prices for a Lunaz conversion start from £350,000.

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Lunaz says that because it has managed to continue production in line with social-distancing practices, it remains on track to double its workforce by the end of the year to cope with a "surge in orders globally", supplementing a team that currently comprises workers with experience at Rolls-Royce, McLaren, Aston Martin, Cosworth, Volkswagen and Formula 1.

In addition to the flagship Jaguar models, Lunaz offers electric versions of the original Bentley Continental, produced from 1955 to 1965, to its exclusive customer base. The first - a rare Continental S2 Flying Spur - is said to have been commissioned by a car collector who will use it as a daily driver.

Lunaz is also in talks with several high-end hospitality firms about the possibility of incorporating the modernised classics into existing limousine fleets.

Read more

Silverstone start-up Lunaz to electrify British classic cars​

The Grenfell garage electrifying VW's motoring icon

Aston Martin offers 'reversible' electric conversion for classic cars​

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Comments
34

5 June 2020

 Everything sounds just dandy till you see the price, £350,000 ?! , still, they've got a full order book, but that could be just ten or a hundred, couldn't it?

21 August 2020
Peter Cavellini wrote:

 Everything sounds just dandy till you see the price, £350,000 ?! , still, they've got a full order book, but that could be just ten or a hundred, couldn't it?

In the grand scheme of things, its not really that expensive, an Eagle E-Type is about £500k.. 

21 August 2020
I don't understand the fuss. The old V8 was a bit of a nail, and Rollers are meant to glide along in silence.

It's not like it's a 250 Ferrari or Corvette, where the engine is the main attraction.

289

5 June 2020

.....fortunately there are so few people daft/wealthy enough to do this conversion!

0-60 times of less than 5 seconds completely misses the point of these cars let alone the ability to handle this sort of performance through ancient driveline architecture.

Loved the 250 MPH range  on a 80 KW battery pack Felix!

 

 

5 June 2020

In reality what difference will this make to CO2? A handful of valuable classic cars butchered just so someone can play lip service to XR and associated lunies. How much CO2 has been created out of all the bespoke construction and hot air generated by all the waffle? Leave them as they are and by all means buy your ludicrously priced EV if you must but dont pretend to be a tree hugger driving around in a car that costs more than most houses. 

5 June 2020

These classics will never travel far enough to recover the CO2 used to make their batteries, so this has nothing to do with being green. With all the extra weight they will have to beef up the suspension which wont improve how these old cars drive either. Only good thing here is the price. It will limit how many cars these people vandalise

21 August 2020
artill wrote:

These classics will never travel far enough to recover the CO2 used to make their batteries, so this has nothing to do with being green. With all the extra weight they will have to beef up the suspension which wont improve how these old cars drive either. Only good thing here is the price. It will limit how many cars these people vandalise

Ah this meme again:

As a rule batteries have no great difference in terms input of energy than an equivilent mass of other engineered materials. The most common materal in them by mass is nickel. There is also o requirement batteries be manufactured using coal (though most of the studies which built this meme assumed that they were, woner who funded them), Tesla manufactures their batteries using solar energy.

I aslo doubt that this conversion will add very much to the mass of the vehicles. The Rolls-Royce drive train is hardly light. A well designed EV isn't that much heavier than an ICE car now anyway. eg.

Audi RS4 - 1715kg

Model 3 P - 1860kg

That is an 8% difference.

Personally I think these vehicles are lovely and the quiet, smooth nature of the EV drivetrain is in keeping with the character of the car. Hiding modern equipment in the classic cabin is the best of both worlds. I doubt anyone will be drag racing them.

21 August 2020
Torque Stear wrote:

Ah this meme again:

As a rule batteries have no great difference in terms input of energy than an equivalent mass of other engineered materials. The most common material in them by mass is nickel. There is also no requirement batteries be manufactured using coal (though most of the studies which built this meme assumed that they were, wonder who funded them), Tesla manufactures their batteries using solar energy.

I also doubt that this conversion will add very much to the mass of the vehicles. The Rolls-Royce drive train is hardly light. A well designed EV isn't that much heavier than an ICE car now anyway. eg.

Audi RS4 - 1715kg

Model 3 P - 1860kg

That is an 8% difference.

Personally I think these vehicles are lovely and the quiet, smooth nature of the EV drivetrain is in keeping with the character of the car. Hiding modern equipment in the classic cabin is the best of both worlds. I doubt anyone will be drag racing them.

 

Good post, well said. I'll just add, it's pretty common for EV conversions of classic cars to be a similar weight or lighter. The Jaguar E-type Zero at Prince Harry's wedding, for example, weighed 80kg less than the original car. Old high-performance powertrains aren't light.

A lot of it depends on how big a battery pack (and therefore how much range and performance) you want though. There's a ~270 kg difference between a 40 kWh pack and an 80 kWh one.

MrJ

5 June 2020

Utterly gorgeous and (hopefully) avoids much of the effort needed to keep an original ICE machine fettled, and offers zero roadside pollution.

A convertible Jaguar-Lunaz would look nice nice to my Cybertruck, though don't think I can afford both - yet!

5 June 2020

As the ex owner of a mechanically scruffy E Type which looked gorgeous but was horrible in traffic, cold, starting etc this would be great. I just don't have £350K plus the E type !

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