205mph single-seat turbine range-extended EV gets a choice of two powertrains with either four or six motor configurations and the potential for motorsport entry

Chinese company Techrules has revealed the Ren RS - a track-only version of its turbine range-extender EV supercar

On display at the Geneva motor show, the 1854kg single-seat supercar is for track use only, and packs a 1287bhp, 1725lb ft punch. At 1854kg, the car is 31kg lighter than the Aston Martin DB11, and has a power-to-weight ratio of 694bhp per tonne - over double that of the Aston

Top speed is claimed to be 205mph, while 0-62mph passes in 3.0sec - the same as a Porsche 911 Turbo. Range is claimed to be around 727 miles from 80 litres of fuel thanks to the diesel-powered turbine range extender, with a 28.4kWh battery pack.

The car can recharge to 80% of this 28.4kWh capacity within 15min when connected to a DC fast charger, and Techrules targets a battery lifespan of 100,000 charging cycles. Diesel is the most efficient fuel, but the Ren is also able to run on gaseous fuels, suggesting the Ren RS will follow suit.

A choice of two powertrain options is available - the car is four-wheel drive, and the entry-level powertrain has two motors powering the front wheels and two for the rear, for combined power and torque of 846bhp and 1150lb ft. The six-motor powertrain, with two motors for the front wheels and four for the rear has 1287bhp and 1725lb ft. 

The car’s design was penned by GFG Style, the new design house of Giorgettto Giugiaro and his son Fabrizio, and was inspired by fighter jets - hence the Turbo Jet decal, which also nods to the turbine range extender powertrain. Deliveries aren’t tied to a specific date, but Techrules plans to have customers in the driving seat within two years. 

It’s a single seater, in place of the Ren’s three-seat layout, with a front canopy opening forward to allow the driver access. The car’s fuel bladder and carbon fibre race seat are FIA approved, while air jack mounting points allow for quick pit stops, and a canopy ejection system also ensures safety in a crash situation, as do manual buttons for popping off the roof from the car’s carbonfibre monocoque.

Although no racing intentions have been confirmed by the company, the choice to incorporate a steel roll cage into the car's upper structure rather than having an enclosed monocoque allows the car to be adapted for different race series requirements. 

Read more

1287bhp Techrules Ren RS track-only supercar due at Geneva motor show

1287bhp Techrules Ren – first diesel-turbine electric supercar revealed

Techrules turbine-recharging supercar pics released ahead of Geneva

2017 Techrules GT96 hypercar to be designed by Italdesign founder

Ariel unveils world-beating supercar with 1180bhp at LCV event

Join the debate

Comments
3

5 March 2018

yes and no, great tech no doubt, but, what tech can be passed on to everyday Transport that’s going to be a step change in my daily drive in the future?

Peter Cavellini.

5 March 2018

I am of the same opinion.

22 March 2018

Can the claims from this manufacturer really be believed? No automotive micro gas turbine has ever been succesfully developed! We are still waiting for such a unit to be demonstarted anywhere in the world. The motoring press should scrutinise the technical feasibility of such a small jet engine powerplant.

ian f bennett

Add your comment

Log in or register to post comments

Find an Autocar car review

Driven this week