Currently reading: 2017 Honda Civic Type R - full specs revealed
The extreme focus of the current Civic Type R has been toned down in an effort to attract a wider audience; the GT version commands a £2000 premium

The 2017 Honda Civic Type R will cost from £30,995 when it hits Honda forecourts this July. 

The current front-drive Nurburgring lap record holder is also announced to cost from £299 a month on a three-year, 5.9% PCP deal. The GT version will cost £32,995 outright, and comes with a host of extras, including an upgraded sound system, LED front fog lights and Honda’s Connect system with sat-nav.

We've driven the new Honda Civic Type R - read the review here

PCP pricing for the GT will be confirmed upon launch, but Honda expects the sales split between Type R and Type R GT to be heavily in favour of the GT - 75% of Civic Type Rs bought in the UK will be GT-badged. The higher-spec model gets improved equipment over the standard car including blind Spot Information, dual-zone climate control, LED front fog lights, an improved stereo system and Garmin sat-nav.

Honda confirmed that pre-orders were received before the car was available to order, but didn't go so far as to reveal how many. Honda did say, however, that US customers will most likely get their hands on new Civic Type Rs first, as it's a larger market than the UK. It'll be the first time a Honda Type R car has been officially marketed in the US. First delivery dates are yet to be confirmed.

2017 Honda Civic Type R revealed

The new Honda Civic Type R hot hatch will strike the perfect balance between performance and comfort, according to project boss Hideki Kakinuma.

Talking about the all-new, tenth-generation Civic-based hot hatch, Kakinuma said: “We are trying to balance two aspects. Some rivals focus on extreme performance and others are going in the comfort direction. We want to go right in the middle.”

The current Type R has been criticised for being too performance-focused, so this move is an acknowledgement that a more middle-of-the-road approach is needed in order to attract a broader audience, not least in the US, where the Type R will be sold for the first time.

Despite this intention, Kakinuma also confirmed that the new Type R will make an attempt on the Nürburgring Nordschleife front-wheel-drive lap record this spring.

A pre-production version of the previous-generation model held the Nürburgring record of 7min 49.21sec until last May, when Volkswagen’s Golf GTI Clubsport S recorded a lap time 1.4sec faster. Honda subsequently responded by setting new front-wheel-drive lap records at five European racing circuits.

2017 Honda Civic Type R specs

The new Civic Type R features a revised version of the turbocharged 2.0-litre VTEC petrol engine used by the outgoing model. The flow rate of the exhaust gases has been increased and the ECU’s mapping has been updated which, Honda claims, improves throttle response and driveability at peak. Torque remains the same, with 295lb ft from 2500rpm to 4500rpm, but peak power is up by 10bhp to 316bhp at 6500rpm.

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Despite the upped power, Honda claims improved fuel economy for the new model, of 36.7mpg with 176g/km CO2; that's 20% more fuel efficient than before, but a 6g/km rise in CO2 emissions. 

Kakinuma said the car’s kerb weight is “just about the same” as the existing Type R’s 1382kg. The new model’s 0-62mph time also matches the current car’s time of 5.7secs, while the car's top speed stands at 169mph. 

The Type R also retains the six-speed manual gearbox of the current car. Kakinuma said: “We want to offer customers the joy of shifting for themselves.” It also introduces a new rev-match control system which promises to give smoother gearshifts and negates heel-and-toe driving.

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LP in Brighton 12 June 2017

£299 per month

Plus how much deposit? You need to look beyond the headline figures to work out the real cost of a PCP scheme. I doubt whether the £299 per month would cover the car's depreciation over three years.
And since fuel consumption and CO2 are directly related to each other, the same percentage figures MUST apply to both ie a 10% reduction in fuel consumed would yield a 10% reduction in CO2. So one of Honda's figures is wrong!
The Apprentice 12 June 2017

As someone who likes 'modern'

As someone who likes 'modern' and has a soft spot for Honda I would normally be defending them, but this one? erm, even I am exiting left discretely. Oh very dear oh very, very, dear.
Halcyon 12 June 2017

Weird logic

"Honda claims improved fuel economy for the new model, of 36.7mpg with 176g/km CO2; that's 20% more fuel efficient than before, but a 6g/km rise in CO2 emissions."

Honda has some wierd logic here; the fuel economy has dropped by 2 mpg and CO2 emissions are up by 6 g/km and they still claim that the new car is a whopping 20 % more efficient (old model did 38.7 mpg and emitted 170 g/km). Bull shit, it's clearly LESS efficient!

Rachel, stop believing all the BS the car manufacturers feed you and start thinking on your own. If a random reader like me can spot the BS, so should you. You're a professional car journalist, for Crist's sake.

Einarbb 12 June 2017

One way to explain the discrepancy

If their figures for the consumption and emissions of the latest car, are closer to real world figures - while the figures for the previous model were based on lab tests that don't reflect what a real world driver is likely to accomplice. Meaning when driving the new car, you'll actually be able to achieve consumption figures and emissions real close to what's claimed. Meaning, the new car might actually emit less real world and consume less real world.
Halcyon 12 June 2017

WLTP vs. NEDC

Transition from NEDC to WLTP test cycle could explain this slight increase in fuel consumption figures. But then again, the WLTP will be used from 9/2017 onward and this car is on sale already on july. Why would Honda use the higher consumption figures in marketing if they don't have do that yet.

It could be also that Honda had to remove their "cheat devices" because the testers know how to look for them now..

Finally a request to Autocar: during this transition period, could you please disclose to which test cycle the fuel consumption and emission figures you report are based on.