The boss of the UK's insurance trade body, James Dalton, disagrees with claims truly autonomous cars are nearly here

The leader of Britain’s car-insurance industry, James Dalton, has downplayed the introduction of self-driving cars saying that he “doesn’t think the term exists.”

Speaking at a conference in London organised by Volvo and the insurance industry’s Thatcham Research, Dalton, the boss of trade body ABI's car insurance division, questioned whether the vision of driverless cars by 2025 was realistic because so many complex problems are yet to be solved.

"I don’t like the term driverless car because I don’t think it exists. At least in the long-term a car is going to need a fit, alert and sober driver," he said.

Dalton believes the government will struggle to create a new regulatory framework capable of completely downplaying the role of a driver.

BMW: autonomous driving is "many, many years away"

The DfT is currently consulting with the insurance and car industries on how to introduce driverless and cars, with a date of 2018 set to allow ‘autopilot control’ in which a driver will be able to take his/her hands off the steering wheel for just two minutes.

Experts at the conference suggest 2025 as the year when a car will be able to driver-itself door-to-door, without as yet specifying whether the driver will be able to cease any form of control.

One of the attractions for the insurance industry of autonomous cars is the possible enormous reduction of accidents, predicted by Peter Shaw, chief executive of Thatcham Research. He predicts that there will be 80% fewer crashes in 10 years time.

"Autonomous driving will be the biggest revolution in vehicle safety-ever. Full-stop," said Shaw.

Autonomous cars could put drivers at risk, says insurance industry

To get this far, however, the legal framework and allocation of blame in an accident will have to be overhauled.

"In essence what we have in the current system – of negligence will have to evolve. How blame may be assigned will evolve," said Tim Marlow, head of autonomous vehicles at Ageas.

Volvo has already said that it will accept the blame in an accident involving one of its self-driving cars if the car is at fault, but how that will work in practice is still unclear.

Erik Coelingh, boss of Volvo’s autonomous driving department, said that its cars will record multiple channels of data, which can be used to allocate blame to either the driver or the car after an accident.

Volvo to launch UK's biggest autonomous driving programme

Speaking on the panel at the event, Autocar and What Car? editorial director Jim Holder quoted a What Car? reader survey that showed 69% of respondents found the idea of self-driving cars "unappealing".

"They - 51% - also say they would feel very unsafe behind the wheel of an autonomous car," Holder added.

Ford, Google and Uber join forces to push autonomous agenda

Our Verdict

Volvo XC90
The new Volvo XC90 costs from £45,750

It has big boots to fill and talented rivals to face. Is it up to the task?

Join the debate

Comments
2

3 May 2016
A term banded about just to get headlines. Erik Coelingh you live in LaLa land

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

3 May 2016
people convicted of embezzling funds, stealing money from their employers, always splash out on a Range Rover? It's always a Range Rover.

Add your comment

Log in or register to post comments

Find an Autocar car review

Driven this week

  • Lexus LC500
    Car review
    20 October 2017
    Futuristic Lexus LC coupé mixes the latest technology with an old-school atmospheric V8
  • Maserati Levante S GranSport
    First Drive
    20 October 2017
    Get ready to trade in your diesels: Maserati’s luxury SUV finally gets the engine it’s always needed
  • Jaguar XF Sportbrake TDV6
    First Drive
    19 October 2017
    The handsome Jaguar XF Sportbrake exhibits all the hallmarks that makes the saloon great, and with the silky smooth diesel V6 makes it a compelling choice
  • Volkswagen T-Roc TDI
    First Drive
    19 October 2017
    Volkswagen's new compact crossover has the looks, the engineering and the build quality to be a resounding success, but not with this diesel engine
  • BMW M550i
    First Drive
    19 October 2017
    The all-paw M550i is a fast, effortless mile-muncher, but there's a reason why it won't be sold in the UK