A source has said that the removal of Piëch could also signal the departure of Audi boss Rupert Stadler

Former Volkswagen Group chairman Ferdinand Piëch may be removed from his role as head of the Porsche SE supervisory board, possibly also triggering the removal of Audi boss Rupert Stadler.

According to German newspaper Bild am Sonntag, Porsche SE, which is the majority shareholder of the Volkswagen Group, has left Piëch off of the list of candidates shareholders can vote for in upcoming leadership elections.

A source told Autocar that his departure could lead to Stadler being removed from his leading position at Audi, because Piëch, who is the grandson of Ferdinand Porsche, had been pushing back on moves to oust him.

Piëch assumed his current role following his departure from the top role in the Volkswagen Group in 2015. At the start of 2017, it was revealed that Volkswagen is considering taking legal action against Piëch after reports claimed he told then boss Martin Winterkorn about the dieselgate emissions scandal before it came to light in 2015.

Why Piëch left Volkswagen in 2015

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Comments
2

13 March 2017
That's the minimum price one has to pay for speaking the truth in today's Germany. If this does not shut up Piech then next step is litigation.

14 March 2017
"Ferdinand Piëch may be removed from his role as head of the Porsche SE supervisory board"; "Porsche SE, which is the majority shareholder of the Volkswagen Group, has left Piëch off of the list of candidates shareholders can vote for in upcoming leadership elections". Porsche SE is an inanimate entity written on paper - it is the people in that organisation that set its direction and make the decisions. So effectively, Ferdinand Piëch has left himself off the list of candidates. The Supervisory board sits over the Vorstand and must approve major decisions. It's got 20 members, 10 elected by the shareholders and 10 employee representatives. Chairman gets two votes if it's a tie. So either he's not even got minimal support, or he's simply decided to retire.

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