Nissan has denied any wrongdoing, but the South Korean government has ruled the Renault-built 1.6-litre diesel engine cheated emissions tests
Jim Holder
9 February 2017

Nissan has been found guilty of using a cheat device on the Renault-sourced 1.6-litre diesel engine on the British-built Qashqai SUV sold in South Korea, the country's government has ruled.

The Japanese manufacturer insists it has complied with regulations.

“We are disappointed with the court’s decision," a statement from Nissan said.

"Nissan Korea maintains that it has complied with all existing regulations and did not use an ‘unjustified arbitrary set-up’ or an illegal defeat device in the Euro 6 Qashqai.”

The South Korean government however ruled that the so-called device lowered nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions under testing, leading to excess NOx emissions when the system deactivated under normal driving conditions.

Qashqai sales in South Korea have been halted and 814 models have been recalled.

Nissan was fined around £300,000 last year after being accused of cheating on its emissions tests, but refuted the claims and later sued the government's environment ministry.

When it was originally accused, the manufacturer strenuously denied accusations by the government that it had used an emissions defeat device.

The South Korean government independently tested real-world emissions of 20 diesel cars in the wake of the Volkswagen dieselgate scandal, and it was believed the cheat device discovered was linked to Nissan's emissions-reducing Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) system, which stopped operating when the engine's temperature reached 35deg Celsius.

"Usually, some cars turn off the emissions reduction device when the temperature reaches 50deg Celsius, to prevent the engine from overheating,'' a government spokesman said at the time. “The Qashqai was the only vehicle that turned it off at 35deg.”

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Comments
11

17 May 2016
I thought normal operating temperature for an engine was 80 or 90 deg C yet turning off the egr at 50 deg C is acceptable!!!

Why does the press talk or imply legal and illegal defeat devices when (to my knowledge) nothing has been tested on a court of law?

Could it all be about protecting the reputation of the EU and trade deals with the USA

I guess we won't find out until after the referendum

17 May 2016
I thought normal operating temperature for an engine was 80 or 90 deg C yet turning off the egr at 50 deg C is acceptable!!!

Why does the press talk or imply legal and illegal defeat devices when (to my knowledge) nothing has been tested on a court of law?

Could it all be about protecting the reputation of the EU and trade deals with the USA

I guess we won't find out until after the referendum

17 May 2016
torovich wrote:

normal operating temperature for an engine was 80 or 90 deg C yet turning off the egr at 50 deg C is acceptable!!!

80/90 deg C will be coolant temp. The 35/50 deg C mentioned will be a different temp - air intake temp from the intercooler or so.

17 May 2016
Maybe your right, but the point is, the article says they are turning off emissions when the engine reaches a temperature. Presumably this is during normal operation and would cause the engine to put out higher emissions on the road than in the lab (which is just what VW are accused of doing).

My question is, why is VW being cast as the bad guy when they all appear to be at it?

9 February 2017
torovich wrote:

Maybe your right, but the point is, the article says they are turning off emissions when the engine reaches a temperature. Presumably this is during normal operation and would cause the engine to put out higher emissions on the road than in the lab (which is just what VW are accused of doing).

My question is, why is VW being cast as the bad guy when they all appear to be at it?

A system that changes the engines operation every the time depending on something like temperature during any normal use, is nothing like deliberately writing ECU software that recognised the unusual driving pattern of an official emission test cycle and drastically changing the engine parameter only for its duration with the express and only purpose of fooling the test.

9 February 2017
The Apprentice wrote:
torovich wrote:

Maybe your right, but the point is, the article says they are turning off emissions when the engine reaches a temperature. Presumably this is during normal operation and would cause the engine to put out higher emissions on the road than in the lab (which is just what VW are accused of doing).

My question is, why is VW being cast as the bad guy when they all appear to be at it?

A system that changes the engines operation every the time depending on something like temperature during any normal use, is nothing like deliberately writing ECU software that recognised the unusual driving pattern of an official emission test cycle and drastically changing the engine parameter only for its duration with the express and only purpose of fooling the test.

It's the same thing all right, just a different method of cheating.

The problem is that real world reductions in NOx can't easily be done - hence the limit going UP 50% under the new WLTP test.

9 February 2017
I think one is more exploiting the weakness of the test protocol and its inability to measure a correct average emission value which would require a longer more natural test to allow temperature cycles to occur. which in my book is different to cheating a specific test and belching out more pollution at all other times. Nissan is a bit like finding a lost fiver on the ground and keeping it, thank you very much. VW waited up a dark alley with a length of pipe and mugged the owner for it. Both wrong but one deserves a harsher judgement than the other.

9 February 2017
Ruperts Trooper wrote:
The Apprentice wrote:
torovich wrote:

Maybe your right, but the point is, the article says they are turning off emissions when the engine reaches a temperature. Presumably this is during normal operation and would cause the engine to put out higher emissions on the road than in the lab (which is just what VW are accused of doing).

My question is, why is VW being cast as the bad guy when they all appear to be at it?

A system that changes the engines operation every the time depending on something like temperature during any normal use, is nothing like deliberately writing ECU software that recognised the unusual driving pattern of an official emission test cycle and drastically changing the engine parameter only for its duration with the express and only purpose of fooling the test.

It's the same thing all right, just a different method of cheating.

The problem is that real world reductions in NOx can't easily be done - hence the limit going UP 50% under the new WLTP test.

No its NOT the same thing alright, unless the Renault software detected that the car was being put through an emissions test?? The Apprentice is correct. What VW did was an utter blatant cheat as the cars were gross NOx emitters unless they ware driven in controlled conditions on an emissions cycle whereby the car would switch to 'low emissions mode' after recognizing it was being tested, (dodgy b#ggers!). From the information given here, there is no low emissions mode as such, but it would seem that the EGR system switched off at a lower (probably air intake) temp than rivals. Not saying that is right at all but it is NOT in the same category as VW.
Having to phase out a function or operation as temperatures/pressures rise is normal. But to switch it off just outside of the drive cycle environment is effectively a defeat device, you cannot calibrate TO the drive cycle. You need to effectively show a 'progressive' emissions behaviour and not a 'stepped' one.

9 February 2017
[quote=torovich]Maybe your right, but the point is, the article says they are turning off emissions when the engine reaches a temperature. Presumably this is during normal operation and would cause the engine to put out higher emissions on the road than in the lab (which is just what VW are accused of doing).

Because VW are the bad guys. Believe me, the industry is fuming with them. This is not in the same category. From an engine development perspective what VW did was hard to believe!

9 February 2017
The myth of clean diesel has been dealt another blow. The engines that have been found to be conclusively dirty in the United States and now Korea still get mouth watering tax breaks in the UK and Europe. Why?

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