Porsche chief executive Oliver Blume is confident the UK will remain a key market for the brand
Matt Burt
29 June 2016

Porsche will remain committed to the UK car market despite the referendum vote to leave the European Union, according to the German car company’s chief executive, Oliver Blume.

Blume also said it was too early to announce whether Brexit will force Porsche to increase the price of the cars it sells in this country.

“We will continue to work together with our colleagues in the UK as we did before – first because they are our friends and second because I think the Porsche enthusiasm in the UK will remain at the same level in the future as well,” he said at yesterday’s launch of the new Porsche Panamera.

“At this moment, we can’t think or talk about [rising prices]. We have to see how all the steps [of the UK’s exit] will go in the future. At this moment, I don’t feel able to say what it means."

Blume admitted the result of the referendum, in which 52% of voters expressed a desire to leave the EU, came as a personal shock. He also said a future strategy would be worked out in conjunction with Porsche GB. 

Porsche delivered 12,167 new cars in the UK in 2015, up from 9160 in 2014. The largest European market is the manufacturer’s home territory, Germany, where 28,953 cars were delivered last year.

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Comments
6

29 June 2016
Let's hope that the EU talk as professional people rather than brassed of and vindictive Bureaucrats when dealing with the UK brexit,otherwise I can see Porche like other german Brands getting a rather rotten name the cheating of VW Audi Porche was bad enough.

29 June 2016
An interview by a spokesperson from a German car company today appeared to back the EU line of no access to the market without meeting all current rules. I hope there is no backlash on German automotive sector and UK customers switch to Jag, Honda, Nissan, because EU based manufacturers start becoming involved in politics. VW group have already shot themselves in the foot once in the last twelve months and risked the wroth of customers without doing themselves more damage.

30 June 2016
The three brands that you mention all build cars in the UK and as successive governments with short term self interested profiteering motives have ended the British owned car industry, they are the closest thing we have to a British car. Why wouldn't you want people here to switch from German brands?

30 June 2016
steady84 wrote:

The three brands that you mention all build cars in the UK and as successive governments with short term self interested profiteering motives have ended the British owned car industry, they are the closest thing we have to a British car. Why wouldn't you want people here to switch from German brands?

I would be happy if they did but German car makers would not. Which is the point I am trying to make, manufacturers supporting EU government negotiating position could have unexpected consequences. Let the politicians do the negotiations now the vote has been taken and don't risk a UK driver backlash.

30 June 2016
So Porche won't 'give up' on the UK market, eh ? Mmmm, I wonder why: could it be something to do with the billions of Euros they earn out of the Brits each year ? Don't pay any attention to the self-serving political hogwash coming out of Messrs Tusk and Juncker: half of their political bosses and associates won't even be in power in 12 months' time. Money talks: the Porsche board would never countenance kicking 12 THOUSAND units per year into touch....

BertoniBertone

3 December 2016
In the world automobile market, Porsche creates a separate place among customers. Due to its modern and advanced features, it delivers an amazing result to the customers. But while studying the UK automobile market, we gladly said that Porsche dominating the entire market structure. According to this article, Porsche will remain commit with UK market and serve better service to the customers.

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