17 September 2013
Feature

Having already declared the Tesla Model S as a landmark car, the time comes to see just how much power those motors and batteries produce. Will it be enough to shame some of the world's most exotic sports cars and supersaloons? Steve Sutcliffe takes a Model S to a rolling road to see how much bhp is generated on the dyno.

Video: Tesla Model S vs Aston Martin Rapide S

Latest videos

Advertisement
Advertisement

Join the debate

Comments
15
Add a comment…
stavers 18 September 2013

Please learn a bit more about EVs

EVs are a very different kettle of fish from ICE powered cars. The battery is NOT 85kW. It is an 85kWh battery which is a measure of energy, not power. Plus the battery powers the motors, not the other way round.

The battery has to have a greater electrical power output than the electric motors otherwise you cannot deliver the mechanical power.

Clarkey 18 September 2013

Re. 'Is it that amazing????'

The price of the Model S Performance with the 85kWh battery is about $85000 and the chief technology officer of Tesla has stated that the battery cost is typically 'way less than half, actually less than a quarter in most cases'.

bezor Ta 18 September 2013

@Clarkey

No, you got the pricing wrong. According to Tesla's own site the Model S performance costs 80,600 Pounds or 128,700 dollars. It's a bit less costly in US because of the $7,500 Federal Tax Credit. It's an expensive luxury electric sports car. Nothing else.

Clarkey 18 September 2013

@bezor

I'm sorry, since you were quoting the price in US dollars I assumed you were buying it there, where it would cost you $83570 with the tax credit or $91070 without. The battery is significantly cheaper than your claim in any case - in fact it is possible to buy a replacement pack for $12000. Yes, it is an expensive luxury car - is there something wrong with that? (seems to suit Maserati, Bentley, etc. just fine)

bezor Ta 18 September 2013

@Clarkey

No, nothing wrong with it. I don't see anything negative with Tesla, just market it for what it is, an expensive luxury electric sports car in the class of cars you mentioned that a very small percentage can afford.

It should not be marketed as a climate savior or the ultimate solution to EV cars. There is always this notion that Tesla is the best EV car. It's not for that price. The real game changers that the masses actually can afford is cars like Prius (over 5 mil so far) or Leaf or a load of new cars coming into the market. But I do understand that Tesla is "sexier", just like Maserati or Bentley.

And for the price and all those batteries it should delivered such power.

bezor Ta 18 September 2013

Is it that amazing???

This car has a minimum of 60,000 dollars of batteries in it (considering the price difference between Tesla models). With a price of over 100,000 dollars, is it that amazing that it has some juice in it and can manage 3 hours of highway driving in 22 degree Celsius?

ThwartedEfforts 18 September 2013

bezor Ta wrote:This car has

bezor Ta wrote:

This car has a minimum of 60,000 dollars of batteries in it (considering the price difference between Tesla models).

that is patently not the case.

How 'bout you provide the cost for replacing a complete engine in, say, a BMW M5. Or indeed any one of the several hundred moving parts it contains, each of which is a likely point of failure; each of which requires many man hours to locate, remove and swap out in the event they break.

The Tesla has a tiny fraction of that ancient, oily, labyrinthine complexity.

bezor Ta wrote:

It should not be marketed as a climate savior or the ultimate solution to EV cars.

it isn't. That kind of stuff is all in your head.